From “The Abundance of Less Lessons in Simple Living from Rural Japan by Andy Couturier

From “The Abundance of Less Lessons in Simple Living from Rural Japan" by Andy Couturier

Pages 264-265



“Sooo..” I begin to ask him, a bit apprehensive, not wanting to be insulting, “Gufu-san, why write all this stuff down?”


Unperturbed, he replies simply, “To make a record. If you don’t record things, you start to lose your sense of the place. It’s also interesting when you talk to other people, or when I want to look up something later. But it’s mostly just to make a record, even if I don’t use the information.”

“Yes, but how do you decide which things to write down?”

“Whatever is possible to write down, I write. How much the bus cost. How much the movie was, or how much the hotel was.”

“But why?” I ask.

“I didn’t have any purpose in doing it.”

No purpose? Perhaps I’ve been too attached to all my own actions being done for a reason. Utilitarianism is so deep in my culture I don’t even notice it. Listening to Gufu it occurs to me that it may not be so good to be always reaching ahead in time. Sitting here with my friend in a farmhouse in the mountains of Japan, I find my way of seeing the world start to deepen and change. All these little, unlooked-at details create the fabric of memory. By writing them down, we are refusing to let the experiences of our lives get subsumed in the tsunami of time, the onrush of the next, and the next, and the next. I think of so many travelers (myself included) zipping from one location to the next, taking photos of scenery or a building. Have I been missing the beautiful in the obvious?

Gufu is showing me--not that he’s trying to show me anything--that the whole world can come alive with these tiny details, ephemera, you might call them. But not just a generalized “world,” but a specific world, an India of a particular time, and, as it happens, an India that is disappearing every day.


Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Good morning everyone! I hope you and your family are healthy and happy 🌈🌈🌈! I am writing to you because I’ve signed this petition asking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to bail-out people not the oil industry. With the oil industry in a steady decline, we should be funding secure and sustainable jobs. A low-carbon economic recovery plan would retrain workers, put folks to work on renewable energy projects and protect the most vulnerable people in our society. If you think that money should support workers too, add your name here https://act.gp/2xmc9K9 Follow the conversation online #NoOilBailout #BailOutPeople Thank you for taking action! Kindly, Verna Phippen




Canadian environmental groups, unions, churches ask that potential oil bailout be for families, not companies

A pickup truck passes a mining shovel filling a haul truck at an oilsands mine near Fort McMurray, Alta., in this July 9, 2008 file photo. A million Canadians are asking the federal government to focus any bailout of the oil industry on workers and families, not corporations. .
 A pickup truck passes a mining shovel filling a haul truck at an oilsands mine near Fort McMurray, Alta., in this July 9, 2008 file photo. A million Canadians are asking the federal government to focus any bailout of the oil industry on workers and families, not corporations. . THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Some Canadian organizations are asking the federal government to focus any bailout of the oil industry on workers and families, not corporations.
The request comes in an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, released Tuesday morning and signed by environmental organizations, faith and labour groups that the signatories say represent about 1.3 million people.
“Giving billions of dollars to failing oil and gas companies will not help workers and only prolongs our reliance on fossil fuels,” the letter says.
Watch below: Some Global News videos about Canada’s oil industry.


Phippen Family Farms 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Phippen <>
Date: Wed, Mar 25, 2020 at 9:49 AM
Subject: Asking Justin Trudeau to bail-out people not the oil industry.
To: Cal Gazdag <CGazdag@caribouland.ca>, Patrick Kam <PKam@deltawestenergy.com>, Patrick Gushue <gushue@codeco-vanoco.com>, Shane Koss <Shane.Koss@baytexenergy.com>, Leon Heck <Leon.heck@cenovus.com>, Rimbey Synergy <rick@rickandersonconsulting.com>, Edward LaFehr <Ed.LaFehr@baytexenergy.com>, Mike Lake <Mike.Lake@parl.gc.ca>, Mike.lake C1a <mike.lake.c1a@parl.gc.ca>, Mike Hartfield <Mike.Hartfield@gov.ab.ca>, Jill Mason <Jill.Mason@gov.ab.ca>, Richard Wilson <view@viewlandresorts.com>, Mark Smith <draytonvalley.devon@assembly.ab.ca>, <duane.krieger@baytex.ab.ca>
Cc: Greenpeace Canada <greenpeace.canada@act.greenpeace.org>, Tom Nahirniak <


Good morning everyone!
I hope you and your family are healthy and happy          🌈🌈🌈
I am writing to you because I’ve signed this petition asking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to bail-out people not the oil industry.
With the oil industry in a steady decline, we should be funding secure and sustainable jobs. A low-carbon economic recovery plan would retrain workers, put folks to work on renewable energy projects and protect the most vulnerable people in our society.
If you think that money should support workers too, add your name here https://act.gp/2xmc9K9
Follow the conversation online #NoOilBailout #BailOutPeople
Thank you for taking action!
Kindly, Verna Phippen 
ReplyForward

Phippen Family Farms 
Atten:   Tom Nahirniak Land Agent  #3811




TRUDEAU: BAIL-OUT WORKERS NOT OIL AND GAS MILLIONAIRES AND CEOS




TRUDEAU: BAIL-OUT WORKERS NOT OIL AND GAS MILLIONAIRES AND CEOS

Peoples’ prosperity, not corporate profits.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed how vulnerable our economy really is[1] — workers have been laid off en masse[2], many are struggling to support families without sick pay or Employment Insurance.
The oil and gas industry helped build this inequitable system[3] that puts profits before people. And now, it’s pushing the government for a bail out[4].
With the oil industry in a steady decline, we should be funding secure and sustainable jobs. A low-carbon economic recovery plan[5] would retrain workers, put folks to work on renewable energy projects and protect the most vulnerable people in our society.
Nobody should be left behind — not the essential and invisible workers on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic, not Indigenous communities, not families lacking social safety nets, and not oil industry workers.
This is a moment when we can implement measures to help vulnerable people, boost the economy, create jobs, and build climate resilience. Add your name to bailout workers, not the oil industry and their CEOs.

Add your name to bailout workers, not the oil industry.

Our demands:
  • Bailout workers and communities - not corporate executives.
  • Economic relief must go directly to workers.
  • Provide free health support to all people.
  • Invest in housing and clean water in Indigenous communities.
  • Build resilient communities to prevent future crises.
  • Create jobs by investing in environmental clean-up and energy transition.




Camrose, Alberta T4V 4N9
Tel/ Fax 
Email: TomNahirniak

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