Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Julie Ali I doubt that the new registrar will be able to change the problems at AHS. The problems of AHS as well as the problems in government are problems of an entitled and self interested workers which results in a highly politicised culture. In my opinion, this culture has negative impacts on the human rights of patients in the medical system as well as residents in the continuing care system.

Hope he will bring in a leadership role to control the bloated bureaucracy in Alberta Health Services and help the underfunded seniors in Long-Term Care.
Comments
Julie Ali I doubt that the new registrar will be able to change the problems at AHS.
The problems of AHS as well as the problems in government are problems of an entitled and self interested workers which results in a highly politicised culture.
In my opinion, this culture has negative impacts on the human rights of patients in the medical system as well as residents in the continuing care system.

With reference to getting services and supports, the patient/ resident with the most effective family supports will get the help they need because we won't be shy to complain all the way to the Premier's office and to the public to get help. 
In contrast, the fate of others who aren't able to do this is less happy. The most disadvantaged citizens without any sort of voice in the society are pretty much screwed.

I think that doctors should be the leaders of the medical team. They have the most experience and education; unfortunately we are now into saving bucks which means the system is being dumbed down. This may be appropriate in some situations and not in others. For example getting nurses to do respiratory therapist work without the courses in respiratory therapy will result in poor outcomes in my opinion. Also the use of nurse practitioners (NPs) which is being flogged by the GOA and the NPs themselves will also result in poor outcomes. If nurses want to become doctors they should go to medical school and not be zebra professionals.

The team approach to medical care has not provided good outcomes because most medical teams, that I have encountered, in my opinion aren't working effectively. For example you have a team lead by an RN who has no experience in a specific area who is partnered with a doctor with similar deficits in knowledge. What sort of results would you expect from this team? Poor results. The team depends on professionals who have the background in the area they are working in so that they can be working effectively in the scope of their job descriptions. The continuing care system for example seems to have a deficiency in staff with backgrounds in geriatric medicine, in complex care management and mental health issues. Some teams at some facilities don't have the necessary team members in other words. Sometimes teams who do have the requisite staff members with the right backgrounds--work well to do this sort of medical work and sometimes they are poorly functioning and patient and resident care suffers.

This registrar may be from the military but so what? In the end doctors are political animals like the politicians themselves and know how far they can push to get what they want in terms of money and other benefits. It's the same with the nurses and other medical professionals. It's time to go beyond the team and leadership models of the past and look to the patients/ residents and their families. The human rights of these folks need to be established and the team should include us--the customers so to speak.

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Patients and families should embrace leadership roles. Doctors can certainly be in charge of the medical teams but I see no reason why patients, families and residents in the continuing care system can't be leaders as well. Patient and resident rights is the next big thing in my opinion that the GOA will need to deal with. There is no point flogging the dead horse of leadership without tackling the problem of human rights abuses in the medical and continuing care system. Start with the rights of patients and residents. We can all be leaders.



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