Tuesday, July 11, 2017

TOP FIVE PAID SUPERINTENDENTS 2015-16 — Salary, benefits and allowances Joan Carr, Edmonton Catholic Schools $415,905 David Stevenson, Calgary Board of Education $342,495 Darrel Robertson, Edmonton Public Schools $330,365 Tim Monds, Parkland School Division $320,204 Doug Nicholls, Fort McMurray Public Schools $307,211---------------Carr, who has spent 11 years at the helm of the province’s fourth-largest school district, received $415,905 in salary and benefits in 2015-16, according to Alberta Education’s recently released annual report.

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I got information on FB that the CEO for Edmonton Catholic Schools is paid big bucks.
At $415,905, Edmonton Catholic's superintendent highest paid in the province OUTRAGEOUS!! All that money diverted from your kids classroom. 😡


Edmonton Catholic Schools’ superintendent Joan Carr earned $415,905 in salary and benefits in 2015-16, says Alberta Education’s latest annual report.
EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM

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Julie Ali She's been getting paid major bucks for ages so why is this news? As for the other over paid person -how about the salary of the CEO of Covenant Health? http://www.cbc.ca/.../24-bonus-paid-to-covenant-health... Hospital CEO wins healthy bonus

The CEO of Covenant Health, the organization that runs Catholic health care facilities in Alberta, received a $112,500 bonus on top of his $472,500 salary last year.

The bonus paid to Patrick Dumelie — known as "at risk pay" — was 24 per cent of his base salary. In comparison, Dr. Chris Eagle, CEO and President of Alberta Health Services, receives a 15 per cent bonus — about $88,000 — on top of his annual salary which is approximately $500,000. **************** This was his pay in 2012 when the good old boys and gals of the PCs were in power. Now I am curious what he is being paid today. 2016 payouts can be found here: https://www.covenanthealth.ca/.../compensation-disclosure He is still getting paid major bucks. But there are others with high pay as well. Dumelie,Patrick President & CEO 2016 $ 544,276.79 $ 31,280.10 (other)


The CEO of Covenant Health, the organization that runs Catholic health care facilities in Alberta, received a…
CBC.CA

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This information is old. We knew about this a long time ago.

What was more of interest to me was the compensation for the CEO of Covenant Health. This position results in major money for the CEO and it's rather unsettling to see this is the case. Here is one taxpayer asking if we can't get a cheaper CEO for this health authority:

http://www.wcr.ab.ca/Letters/entryid/4442

Letters to the Editor


Letters


Covenant Health salary for CEO is disappointing

August 26, 2013
It is extremely disappointing to hear that Covenant Health’s CEO is being paid a salary beyond that of the CEO of the far-larger Alberta Health Services.
We have indeed a rich history of health care provided, originally by many religious orders of women, in response to epidemics and the need for hospital care, often in remote areas.
Surely one can find executives who are looking for more than huge salaries and who can continue the unique Christian service to all who come to their doors.
Edward Kennedy, CSsR
Edmonton
****

I mean I've never understood why we had to have a contract with the Catholic health authority in the first place. It's getting taxpayer dollars to overpay staff at all levels and if we just had AHS we could control this waste of cash.

But of course no one cares in Alberta. The PCs set up the Covenant Health folks in style and we're stuck with the waste of cash by this health authority.

We only knew of the waste of cash due to the reporters who published the major costs to the public purse:

The 2011 compensation for the CEO of Covenant Health was pretty hefty:
The total compensation paid to Dumelie, including pension and non-cash benefits, was about $756,000 as of March 2011.
*****
I'm imagining that this compensation has not gone down.
Why? Because when you're being paid by taxpayers, your salary stays the same or improves.

The CEO of Covenant Health, the organization that runs Catholic health care facilities in Alberta, received a $112,500 bonus on top of his $472,500 salary last year
CBC.CA



http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/24-bonus-paid-to-covenant-health-ceo-1.1288428

24% bonus paid to Covenant Health CEO

CBC News Posted: Aug 20, 2012 8:02 AM MT Last Updated: Aug 20, 2012 8:11 PM MT
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The CEO of Covenant Health, the organization that runs Catholic health care facilities in Alberta, received a $112,500 bonus on top of his $472,500 salary last year.
The bonus paid to Patrick Dumelie — known as "at risk pay" — was 24 per cent of his base salary. In comparison, Dr. Chris Eagle, CEO and President of Alberta Health Services, receives a 15 per cent bonus — about $88,000 — on top of his annual salary which is approximately $500,000.
si-dumelie
Covenant Health President and CEO Patrick Dumelie at a news conference in March 2011. (CBC)
Covenant Health has 15,000 employees and an annual operating budget of $724 million, which comes mostly from a service contract with Alberta Health Services. AHS, in comparison has 90,000 employees and an annual budget of $11.9 billion.
The total compensation paid to Dumelie, including pension and non-cash benefits, was about $756,000 as of March 2011.
Covenant Health Board Chairman John Brennan is defending the bonus paid to Dumelie.
In an email to CBC News, he writes "attracting senior health executives is a highly competitive undertaking and to attract the quality of leadership needed requires adequate compensation within market conditions."
Dumelie wasn't the only Covenant Health executive to receive a bonus. The organization has 16 vice-presidents. CBC News received information on compensation paid to three senior vice-presidents and five vice-presidents, which show bonuses ranging from 10 to 15.7 per cent of their base salaries.

'Disrespectful' to front-line workers

The bonus paid to Dumelie touched a nerve with Sandra Azocar, executive director of Friends of Medicare. She says that amount could hire at least two licensed practical nurses.
"I find it disrespectful to the people that are receiving services in ... facilities that Covenant Health owns and the people that provide the front-line services," she said. "There's a huge difference between public sector workers and public sector management."
Liberal Leader Raj Sherman says big bonuses for executives sends the wrong message to front-line staff.
"I can understand if the health system is performing top notch. Everyone should get a bonus throughout the system," he said.  "But just for the top executives getting $100,000, $200,000 bonuses, you know that just isn't fair"
The bonuses paid to Dumelie and the other Covenant Health executives are based on performance targets. The organization hasn't indicated what the performance measures were and how close executives came to meeting them.
The Covenant Health Board is appointed by and accountable to Alberta bishops. Richard Smith, the archbishop of Edmonton, declined an interview request from CBC News.
Covenant Health runs the Grey Nuns and Misericordia Hospitals in Edmonton, as well as Villa Caritas and the Edmonton General Continuing Care Centre.
The organization also operates hospitals in Banff, Vegreville, Mundare and Camrose; health centres in Killam and Bonnyville; and continuing care facilities in Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, Trochu and Castor. .

With files from the CBC's Kim Trynacity
****************

In 2011 the CEO of Covenant Health was getting major bucks:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/24-bonus-paid-to-covenant-health-ceo-1.1288428
The total compensation paid to Dumelie, including pension and non-cash benefits, was about $756,000 as of March 2011.


***
So I really doubt that his salary has gone down. But if we look at the compensation reported we get these figures:

https://www.covenanthealth.ca/corporate-information/financial-information/compensation-disclosure

Dumelie,PatrickPresident & CEO2016$ 544,276.79$ 31,280.10$ 0.00



And now what has happened appears to be that the salary coming from the public funds is reported but other monies that the CEO may be getting from other sources do not make it to publication:


The Sunshine list for Covenant Health is full of interesting sums of cash that we pay for. I'm thinking that if we didn't have Covenant Health as a non-profit contractor of health services in Alberta we'd save significant sums of cash. The pay for some of their positions is excessive and there appears to be some bloat in the salaries at this organization compared to the already rich salaries at AHS. The top is being paid the most. But we're not entirely clear how much the CEO is getting since only the cash he gets from the taxpayers of Alberta appears to be on this list. When asked if the CEO was getting paid from other sources this was the response which suggests he may be getting top up money from elsewhere. I mean what else could this bit mean? Covenant Health was "to remove salary invoiced to non-public funding sources."
But it is not clear if Dumelie's pay has actually been reduced or if he is simply getting paid money from other sources than Covenant is no longer disclosing.
Covenant's emailed statement said it had improved the transparency of its contract with Dumelie "to clearly state the salary supported through public funding related to Covenant Health - and to remove salary invoiced to non-public funding sources."
CBC News asked Kuntz if Dumelie is being paid from other entities under the Covenant umbrella, and if so, which entities, how much and how is Dumelie's time, serving these various entities, tracked.
Kuntz said she couldn't provide any additional information late Friday afternoon.
Dumelie's contract, posted online, shows that as of 2014 he also received $1 million-dollar life insurance, in addition to Covenant's existing group life plan, disability insurance that pays full salary and benefits, and club or fitness memberships of up to $10,000 yearly. Dumelie also receives a car allowance of $13,200 a year.
Created in 2008, Covenant Health is a Catholic health-care organization, which operates 18 hospitals and care facilities across the province. In Edmonton, these include the Grey Nuns Community Hospital and the Misericordia Community Hospital. It also operates the Banff Mineral Springs Hospital.
With 11,000 employees and a budget of $843 million, Covenant is about one-tenth the size of Alberta Health Services. Despite this, AHS CEO Verna Yiu is paid about $575,000 a year, slightly more than Dumelie's disclosed salary.

Dozens of Covenant Health’s registered nurses and nurse practitioners were paid more than $150,000 a year, according to salaries disclosed for the first time under the NDP government’s new “Sunshine List.”
CBC.CA



http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/dozens-of-covenant-health-nurses-paid-over-150-000-1.3652381

Dozens of Covenant Health nurses paid over $150,000

Online disclosure reveals high salaries

By Charles Rusnell, CBC News Posted: Jun 24, 2016 6:00 PM MT Last Updated: Jun 24, 2016 6:00 PM MT
 Covenant Health CEO Patrick Dumelie appears to have a salary cut.
Covenant Health CEO Patrick Dumelie appears to have a salary cut. (CBC)
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Dozens of Covenant Health's registered nurses and nurse practitioners were paid more than $150,000 a year, according to salaries disclosed for the first time under the NDP government's new "Sunshine List."
The list reveals 59 registered nurses were paid more than $150,000. Of those, two nurses pulled in more than $210,000 in 2015. Five nurse practitioners were paid more than $150,000, with one earning more than $198,000.
Covenant Health spokesperson Rayne Kuntz, in an emailed statement, said the high-paid nurses make up a very small percentage of its 11,000 staff.
The nurses' compensation "includes base salary, overtime, shift premiums, weekend premiums, on-call pay, sick pay and vacation pay," the statement said. "Also listed in a separate column are non-monetary benefits, including the amount of employer paid benefits premiums, employer paid portion of EI, CPP, etc."
Sandra Azocar from the Friends of Medicare said high salaries for registered nurses shows poor planning.
"They're having to call in nurses on short notice on overtime to meet the roster needs," she said. "That means there would also be a shortage of RNs (registered nurses)."
The disclosure also includes the salary, and contract, of Covenant Health Chief Executive Officer Patrick Dumelie. At more than $560,000, Dumelie's pay in 2015 appears to be a reduction of nearly $300,000 from 2013, when CBC News reported Dumelie was paid $826,000 a year.

CEO salary reduced?

But it is not clear if Dumelie's pay has actually been reduced or if he is simply getting paid money from other sources than Covenant is no longer disclosing.
Covenant's emailed statement said it had improved the transparency of its contract with Dumelie "to clearly state the salary supported through public funding related to Covenant Health - and to remove salary invoiced to non-public funding sources."
CBC News asked Kuntz if Dumelie is being paid from other entities under the Covenant umbrella, and if so, which entities, how much and how is Dumelie's time, serving these various entities, tracked.
Kuntz said she couldn't provide any additional information late Friday afternoon.
Dumelie's contract, posted online, shows that as of 2014 he also received $1 million-dollar life insurance, in addition to Covenant's existing group life plan, disability insurance that pays full salary and benefits, and club or fitness memberships of up to $10,000 yearly. Dumelie also receives a car allowance of $13,200 a year.


Created in 2008, Covenant Health is a Catholic health-care organization, which operates 18 hospitals and care facilities across the province. In Edmonton, these include the Grey Nuns Community Hospital and the Misericordia Community Hospital. It also operates the Banff Mineral Springs Hospital.
With 11,000 employees and a budget of $843 million, Covenant is about one-tenth the size of Alberta Health Services. Despite this, AHS CEO Verna Yiu is paid about $575,000 a year, slightly more than Dumelie's disclosed salary.
Several other health authorities of similar size to Covenant also pay their CEOs less than Dumelie.
Back in 2013, Covenant board chair John Brennan defended Dumelie's salary. He said Covenant's executive compensation is reviewed by external consultants and "the compensation of every senior executive falls either within or below established compensation bands" for health-industry executives.

If you have any information about this story, or information for another story, please contact us in confidence at cbcinvestigates@cbc.ca.
******

So basically the CEO may still be getting 2011 wages but we don't know since the money may be coming from different pots. Really it's not necessary for us to ask the Covenant Health folks about this sort of over payment; we should simply end the contract with this health authority. Even the nurses and other staff are getting major sums of public cash for what?
 Just look at the pay these folks are getting here:


https://www.covenanthealth.ca/corporate-information/financial-information/compensation-disclosure

Name More Options
Position 
Year 
Compensation 
Other 
Severance 
Attachments 
Abedi,JafarBed Manager2016$ 128,359.69$ 23,190.20$ 0.00
Adeyinka,KayodeRegistered Nurse2016$ 144,075.78$ 22,475.77$ 0.00
Andrusiak,BruceCorporate Director2016$ 138,485.15$ 27,601.80$ 0.00
Antymniuk,CherylynSite Administrator2016$ 168,002.31$ 31,209.66$ 0.00
Ashdown,ChrisCommittee Member2016$ 600.00$ 0.00$ 0.00
Ashton,DeirdreCommittee Member2016$ 600.00$ 0.00$ 0.00
Aylwin,ScottSenior Director2016$ 163,481.81$ 33,469.11$ 0.00
Babcock,CarolUnit Manager2016$ 131,417.65$ 24,942.29$ 0.00
Baerg,ScottSenior Operating Officer2016$ 273,781.85$ 33,949.95$ 0.00Contract
Barry,GeorgiaProgram Manager2016$ 135,091.12$ 26,121.17$ 0.00


Name 
Position 
Year 
Compensation More Options
Other 
Severance 
Attachments 
Barsi,GrahamDirector2016$ 131,634.09$ 31,344.33$ 0.00
Berezan,JimCommittee Member2016$ 850.00$ 0.00$ 0.00
Bhatti,RavinderRegistered Nurse2016$ 160,821.30$ 23,170.07$ 0.00
Bileski,GwenPharmacist I2016$ 126,635.68$ 26,770.61$ 0.00
Bosecke,GlenCorporate Director2016$ 133,234.16$ 27,359.19$ 0.00
Bourgoin,AimeeNurse Practitioner2016$ 146,877.81$ 28,758.57$ 0.00
Brannen,AnthonySite Administrator2016$ 145,760.52$ 28,844.33$ 0.00
Breckenridge,DiannaRegistered Nurse2016$ 130,956.12$ 10,359.40$ 0.00
Brenneis,CarleenDirector2016$ 161,767.46$ 30,329.50$ 0.00
Buchan,ShelleySite Administrator2016$ 142,692.35$ 27,734.55$ 0.00


Name More Options
Position 
Year 
Compensation 
Other 
Severance 
Attachments 
Buddle,HarryBoard Member2016$ 2,900.00$ 0.00$ 0.00
Bukmeier,DianneManager2016$ 131,459.72$ 8,225.64$ 0.00
Burko,JudyRegistered Nurse2016$ 145,358.48$ 21,331.33$ 0.00
Cameron,LindaSenior Director2016$ 179,175.14$ 6,088.26$ 0.00
Cardinal,SuzanneProgram Manager2016$ 144,743.37$ 26,516.30$ 0.00
Carlson,AshleyDirector2016$ 128,450.39$ 29,947.86$ 0.00
Celeste-Palanca,MelindaRegistered Nurse2016$ 141,560.94$ 23,619.83$ 0.00
Chaaban,RawadRegistered Nurse2016$ 159,192.94$ 23,557.60$ 0.00
Chernezky,BillPharmacist I2016$ 127,154.32$ 27,016.65$ 0.00
Chivers,LanaSenior Director2016$ 157,458.38$ 32,473.78$ 0.00



Name 
Position 
Year 
Compensation 
Other 
Severance 
Attachments 
Chow-Turner,LindaSenior Operating Officer2016$ 219,638.23$ 31,794.53$ 0.00Contract
Clark,GeraldineSite Administrator2016$ 139,879.71$ 24,780.32$ 0.00
Print Clarke,DesireeRegistered Nurse2016$ 127,760.68$ 19,073.34$ 0.00
Clarke,SandraProgram Manager2016$ 126,418.08$ 6,221.03$ 0.00
Classen,HelenExecutive Director2016$ 139,920.11$ 28,318.43$ 0.00
Coates,DarrellSite Administrator2016$ 153,222.50$ 28,039.39$ 0.00
Cooper,TerencePsychologist II2016$ 133,718.31$ 27,418.34$ 0.00
Cope,CarynRegistered Nurse2016$ 138,841.12$ 22,705.95$ 0.00
Corie,BrianPlumber2016$ 127,671.48$ 22,301.85$ 0.00
Cowie,JoanneCorporate Director2016$ 176,370.98$ 30,329.54$ 0.00





It just goes on and on. No wonder we don't have any money for the continuing care system. It's going to pay for salaries of the top dogs. And for infrastructure that we don't own.


Just because we have agreements between folks and organizations and government doesn't mean we can't change the system. We don't need to be doing the maintenance, repair, renovations and expansions for the properties of private non-profit organizations like Covenant Health. We're left with no assets and we're paying for the bloated executive and managerial staff salaries. I see no reason for any of this to continue. Why not just have AHS as the health authority and cut Covenant Health out of the public provision of services?
Covenant Health could still work in the private sector but it would have to rustle for cash by itself. I'm betting that without the reliance on the taxpayers of Alberta we'd get compensation of executive and managerial staff down to the levels at AHS which are still very rich.


During the 2015-2016 year, the Misericordia saw 51,214 visits to its emergency department; more than double the volume it was designed to accommodate.
GLOBALNEWS.CA


http://globalnews.ca/news/3353415/65m-for-misericordia-hospital-will-include-new-emergency-department/

April 3, 2017 11:21 am
Updated: April 3, 2017 7:15 pm

$65M for Misericordia Hospital will include new emergency department

By Emily MertzWeb Producer Global News
WATCH ABOVE: On Monday, Alberta's health minister gave more details on plans first announced in last month's budget. As Fletcher Kent reports, Edmonton's Misericordia Hospital will be getting a new emergency department.
- A A +
In the Alberta government’s 2017 budget, the NDP announced $65 million over four years for upgrades to Edmonton’s Misericordia Hospital. On Monday, the province said that modernization project includes a new emergency department.
“Funding for a new emergency department is a major step forward towards a modern, vibrant Misericordia that meets the needs of the communities in west Edmonton and beyond for generations to come,” said Patrick Dumelie, Covenant Health president and CEO.

RELATED

During the 2015-2016 year, the Misericordia saw 51,214 visits to its emergency department; more than double the volume it was designed to accommodate.
The current ER was built in 1969 and it was renovated in 1989.
“The Mis emergency department is the closest hospital for some of Edmonton’s most socio-economically challenged neighbourhoods,” said Tana Fish, program manager of emergency services. “Seniors and people with mental illness represent a large portion of people who come through our doors each day.
“We love the Misericordia and we are proud of the care we provide but there is no question that we work in an environment that has its challenges,” Fish explained. “The space is cramped, there is a lack of privacy… We are excited and grateful for today’s announcement.”
Construction on the new ER will start by late 2018, the province said and will also create “hundreds of good, mortgage-paying jobs,” Health Minister Sarah Hoffman said.
“The new build will not disrupt current services during construction,” Dumelie said. “The current emergency will be built as a connected part of the hospital.”
The $65 million is on top of more than $9 million the province has spent on improvements to elevators, water systems, fire alarms and sprinklers.
On the operations side, health spending remains the biggest-ticket item of the provincial budget, at $21.4 billion– $685 million more than last year. The 3.2-per cent increase comes despite discussion last year by the province that health spending in Alberta was outpacing per capita spending in other provinces, including British Columbia and Ontario. In the last budget, the province noted it was working with AHS to find ways to cut costs.
AHS will receive $14.7 billion, while $5.2 billion will go to compensate the province’s doctors, an increase of $400 million over last year, though the province says a new agreement with the Alberta Medical Association will save $500 million over two years.
The flood at the Misericordia in May 2013 forced more than 50 patients and more than 160 staff members to be transferred to the Royal Alexandra Hospital. Then in 2014, the hospital flooded twice in three weeks because of heavy rainfall.
Since then, there have been calls to replace the hospital, which was built in the 1960s. In 2014, the then-opposition Alberta NDP was among those calling for a replacement hospital.
“Our government is proud to fix problems ignored by the previous government for far too long,” Hoffman said.
“We know the community has been waiting years for improvements at the Misericordia. We are listening and making life better for patients and hospital staff with this investment.”
A report released by AHS in October recommended scaling back upgrades at the Misericordia, to steer funding towards other projects. The same report suggested a new hospital would be needed in Edmonton to keep up with acute care services in the future.

Former premier and current Covenant Health Board Chair Ed Stelmach attended Monday’s announcement.



Julie Ali · 

So I was curious about why we are paying for the maintenance, repair and the expansion of a private non-profit's assets. I asked the government of Alberta for an explanation and all I was told was the following facts:

1) There was a 1994 agreement between the GOA and the Catholic Health Association of Alberta. I don't know what the terms of this agreement are.
2) The relationship between AHS and Covenant Health is apparently made civilized with a Cooperation and Services Agreement signed in 2010.

3) The timing of this agreement coincides with the presence of the PCs.
4) Covenant Health works as a private contractor providing services in the health care system.

So even if there is an agreement between the GOA and the Catholic Health Association of Alberta and an agreement between AHS and Covenant Health resulting in provision of services this does not mean that government can't limit the damage to the public purse by decreasing the dollar value of the contract.

In other words if there is a requirement for fiscal subsidy of the renovation, maintenance and expansion sort as seen in this hospital maybe we should just forbear to contract to Covenant Health and do the creation of hospitals in the public sector instead. Covenant Health could still do the work in the private sector but not with our funds.

In addition I see no reason for us to support the high payouts to the executive staff that comes from public funds. We're not able to provide services and supports to seniors in the continuing care system in a reasonable fashion and so why not just stop paying for these major salaries indirectly and instead go public with reduced staff salaries?

Staff at Covenant Health are getting paid more than staff at AHS and why? Because we're paying for these excessive salaries via the contractual compensation paid to Covenant Health.

https://www.covenanthealth.ca/.../compensation-disclosure
Name Position Year Compensation Other Severance

Buddle,Harry Board Member 2016 $ 2,900.00 $ 0.00 $ 0.00
Bukmeier,Dianne Manager 2016 $ 131,459.72 $ 8,225.64 $ 0.00
Burko,Judy Registered Nurse 2016 $ 145,358.48 $ 21,331.33 $ 0.00
Cameron,Linda Senior Director 2016 $ 179,175.14 $ 6,088.26 $ 0.00
Cardinal,Suzanne Program Manager 2016 $ 144,743.37 $ 26,516.30 $ 0.00
Carlson,Ashley Director 2016 $ 128,450.39 $ 29,947.86 $ 0.00
Celeste-Palanca,Melinda Registered Nurse 2016 $ 141,560.94 $ 23,619.83 $ 0.00
Chaaban,Rawad Registered Nurse 2016 $ 159,192.94 $ 23,557.60 $ 0.00
Chernezky,Bill Pharmacist I 2016 $ 127,154.32 $ 27,016.65 $ 0.00
Chivers,Lana Senior Director 2016 $ 157,458.38 $ 32,473.78 $ 0.00

*****

There is no reason for the NDP folks to keep this sort of poor fiscal payout continuing. I mean the MLAs are in charge of legislation. Simply legislate a new way out of these sorts of money pits. Don't have Covenant Health as a private contractor when it wastes our taxpayer dollars in this way.
LikeReplyJust nowEdited
Julie Ali · 

I am curious. Everyone is yapping about the money received by the Misericordia Hospital but no one is asking why this hospital is getting ANY money from the government of Alberta.

I have some questions about our funding of such a hospital.

1) This hospital is owned by a private organization--which is Covenant Health. So my first question is why are we paying for an emergency for this private organization?

2) What sort of arrangement does Covenant Health have with AHS that governs the provision of services and what are we obliged to pay for in order to get these services?

3) What sort of oversight does AHS and the government of Alberta have over this private organization?

4) What is the benefit to the public of paying for the maintenance, upgrading and expansion of the facilities owned by a private organization when we could build our own hospitals and keep them as public assets?

5) What sort of role does Covenant Health play in the current health authority set up? What legislation provides them with ANY role at all in the health care system? Who set up this role for Covenant Health and why?

6) Recently in Saskatchewan there was a court ruling indicating that public dollars are not required to go the public school system. Similarly I don't believe that public dollars need to go to a Catholic health authority and as such why are public dollars going to a separate health authority?

7) Why is there no information provided to the public of the legal requirements of Alberta Health with reference to this private organization and it's role in the health care system? It is not clear to me if there are any laws that define the role of Covenant Health and it's requirement for funding by the public. In my opinion, we are wasting money on a second health authority with duplication of bureaucratic systems as well as the major amounts of cash being spent on Covenant Health Executive staff in addition to the AHS executive staff. We're not made of money. If we're not legally required to sustain this second health care authority --it should be dissolved or it should fund itself in terms of maintenance, upgrades and additions.




********



All in all a double health authority system is a bad set up for Albertans. The PCs are responsible for this set up but there is nothing to stop the GOA from changing the set up. The NDP folks could simply cut this company free to do what it wants in the non-profit sector without providing our money for their work and their infrastructure maintenance, repairs, expansion etc. I see no reason for us to have two health authorities and the duplication that this entrails. It's simply a waste of money.  And if you want to see how much money is wasted on the top dogs you can just look at this Sunshine List which isn't very sunny except for the folks being paid major bucks on our dollar.

http://edmontonjournal.com/news/local-news/edmonton-catholics-superintendent-is-highest-paid-in-the-province

Edmonton Catholic's superintendent is highest paid in the province

Published on: July 11, 2017 | Last Updated: July 11, 2017 6:00 AM MDT
Edmonton Catholic Schools Superintendent Joan Carr is seen during a school board session held regarding her contract at the board's offices in Edmonton on Friday, January 27, 2017.
Edmonton Catholic Schools Superintendent Joan Carr is seen during a school board session held regarding her contract at the board's offices in Edmonton on Friday, January 27, 2017. IAN KUCERAK / POSTMEDIA
The superintendent of Edmonton Catholic Schools, Joan Carr, remains the highest paid school district leader in the province, newly published data show.
Carr, who has spent 11 years at the helm of the province’s fourth-largest school district, received $415,905 in salary and benefits in 2015-16, according to Alberta Education’s recently released annual report.
Her salary is at the highest level due to her long service in the post and market conditions at the time her contract was negotiated five years ago, Edmonton Catholic school board chairwoman Laura Thibert said in written statement.
“I am in awe of Joan’s leadership style and her commitment to Catholic education,” Thibert said.
At a heated meeting last January, the school board narrowly voted 4 to 3 to extend Carr’s contract to August 2018.
Trustee John Acheson said in January it was time for a new superintendent to navigate the district through an impending new K-12 curriculum and enrolment growth that is taxing the capacity of school buildings.
At the time, trustee Patricia Grell said board colleague Larry Kowalczyk was in a conflict of interest when he voted in favour of Carr’s contract because Kowalczyk’s wife is a school principal who reports to Carr.
The school district’s three-year graduation rate has increased under Carr’s tenure, Thibert said, adding the district has been named one of Alberta’s top 70 employers for two consecutive years.
The Canadian Association of School System Administrators named Carr national superintendent of the year in 2016.

Parting gifts

Meanwhile, two Alberta school superintendents took home six-figure severance payments last year, according to the report, driving up leadership costs in two small school divisions.
In Grande Prairie, past public school district superintendent Carol Ann MacDonald left in December 2015 with $249,022 in severance and retirement allowance on top of her salary. At the time, the board said it had decided a few days earlier to end her employment.
MacDonald, who left the division with eight months remaining in her five-year-contract, is now suing the Grande Prairie public school board for $1.8 million and the board is counter-suing her. Both parties are accusing the other of acting improperly, and MacDonald claims the board misrepresented the terms of the contract when they offered her the job. Both parties deny the others’ claims, and none of the allegations has been proven in court.
Board chairman John Lehners said the board is attempting to recoup a $50,000 retirement bonus from MacDonald. He wouldn’t comment further while the case was in court.
MacDonald said in an email she did not receive $249,022 in severance, but did not clarify the amount. She wouldn’t comment further while the matter is before the courts.
Former Wolf Creek school division superintendent Larry Jacobs retired from the Ponoka-based school division with a $202,439 severance package, then died a few months later.
Jacobs was earning $205,000 a year when he went on sick leave in February 2016, Wolf Creek school board chairwoman Lorrie Jess said.
In a school division with a $91-million annual budget, such a severance payout is “huge,” she said.
“You don’t budget for that and you try to keep the money in the classroom. But, it does happen,” Jess said.
School superintendents are the only direct employee of Alberta school boards. Boards hire superintendents and negotiate the terms of their employment.
Although most public agencies in Alberta are required to publish the salaries of all employees earning more than $107,000 a year, school boards are exempt from the rule. Boards must publish yearly compensation to their superintendent, secretary and treasurer in their audited financial statements.
Edmonton Public Schools and the Calgary Board of Education publish a range of salaries for different employee groups on their websites.
TOP FIVE PAID SUPERINTENDENTS 2015-16 — Salary, benefits and allowances
  1. Joan Carr, Edmonton Catholic Schools $415,905
  2. David Stevenson, Calgary Board of Education $342,495
  3. Darrel Robertson, Edmonton Public Schools $330,365
  4. Tim Monds, Parkland School Division $320,204
  5. Doug Nicholls, Fort McMurray Public Schools $307,211
With files from Kevin Hampson, Grande Prairie Herald-Tribune
jfrench@postmedia.com

Julie Ali · 

While I do agree that a superintendent's job is complex and demanding this sort of compensation is out of line in my opinion. There are 61 superintendent positions in Alberta; all of this compensation adds up to major costs for taxpayers as well as less money available for front line staff and students.
I think the GOA needs to create an Education Superboard in Alberta. This would allow for the over the top payment of one or two superintendents and a province wide board. When there is not enough money coming in, there needs to be better use of the money we have.

While everyone is upset about the salaries in education maybe there should be some review of the salaries in the health care system which is also full of overpaid executive staff. If you look at the compensation for the CEO of Covenant Health we can see that the money being paid out from public funds in 2016 was $544,276.79 plus $31,280.10. 

https://www.covenanthealth.ca/.../compensation-disclosure
Dumelie,Patrick President & CEO 2016 $ 544,276.79 $ 31,280.10 $ 0.00

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This is just the money he gets from Alberta taxpayers. When Covenant Health was asked about other sources of payment for his salary there was no information provided. 

http://www.cbc.ca/.../dozens-of-covenant-health-nurses...

But it is not clear if Dumelie's pay has actually been reduced or if he is simply getting paid money from other sources than Covenant is no longer disclosing.

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In 2012 the disclosed salary from all sources was pretty epic:

http://www.cbc.ca/.../24-bonus-paid-to-covenant-health...
The CEO of Covenant Health, the organization that runs Catholic health care facilities in Alberta, received a $112,500 bonus on top of his $472,500 salary last year.

The bonus paid to Patrick Dumelie — known as "at risk pay" — was 24 per cent of his base salary. In comparison, Dr. Chris Eagle, CEO and President of Alberta Health Services, receives a 15 per cent bonus — about $88,000 — on top of his annual salary which is approximately $500,000.

The total compensation paid to Dumelie, including pension and non-cash benefits, was about $756,000 as of March 2011.

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And so while it is true that the payouts for superintendents are rich --they aren't as astronomical as those paid to the executive staff at Covenant Health. 

In fact many folks at Covenant Health get paid a lot more than folks at AHS and I am curious why we continue to have a second health authority for no reason. Even if there is a Cooperation and Services Agreement signed by by AHS and Covenant Health based on a 1994 agreement between the GOA and the Catholic Health Association of Alberta--there is no reason for us to keep this entity on our payroll. Government just has to change the legislation and set this group free to work in the private sector. We should not be indirectly paying for the major cash payments to executive staff and professionals in this group. We are also paying for upkeep, renovations and expansion of this private contractor's properties -none of these assets belong to the taxpayers of Alberta. So why are we subsidizing their asset maintenance and improvement?

It is doubtful to me that we can sustain such large payouts with the decrease in oil and gas revenues. I guess no one is willing to make a change in government and so we'll keep paying as taxpayers until there is no money left.
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