Sunday, July 9, 2017

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects all Canadians "even when it is uncomfortable," responding to a question about his government's apology and controversial payout to former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr. "The Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects all Canadians, every one of us, even when it is uncomfortable. This is not about the details or merits of the Khadr case. When the government violates any Canadian's Charter rights we all end up paying for it," he told reporters in Hamburg, where he's wrapping up the G20 summit.


Leah McRorie
12 mins

I am hiding all Omar posts. This isn't about human rights at all. IMO
Comments
Julie Ali I disagree. It is all about human rights abuses.
Reply11 mins
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Leah McRorie I disagree.
Reply7 mins
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Julie Ali You can disagree. It's a free country. When the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is ignored it becomes a human rights abuse in my opinion.
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1
5 mins
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Leah McRorie Meanwhile Michener..... it's not about human rights. It's about him.
Reply4 mins
Julie Ali Leah McRorie Leah of course it is about him. He was abused. Imagine if this happened to one of your family members. Would it not be about them as well?
Reply3 mins
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Julie Ali Michener isn't going to be even looked at by the government. What do they care about the least among us?
Reply3 mins
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Leah McRorie Had extended family member in Michener. Died. Abuse, eugenics, isolation.... uh huh
Sad
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3 mins
Julie Ali Leah McRorie And has government done anything? Nope. Because government won't be held accountable by us. It's the way it is. Shameful but reality.
Reply2 mins
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Leah McRorie Julie Ali it's not about human rights it's all about the perception
Reply2 mins
Julie Ali Leah McRorie Sure. If we could get the media in a frenzy about Michener we could also get justice but no go.
Reply1 min
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Leah McRorie So let's not think gov is doing anything for rights.
Reply1 min
Julie Ali Leah McRorie I don't think the government is doing anything for rights except when media is involved.
ReplyJust now
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Julie Ali Media is the only way to hold government accountable. We don't count.
ReplyJust now

More accurate to say that both the Liberals and the Conservatives are two faced on Khadr. Really why not just say that the government is guilty of poor performance and we are all paying for the incompetence of both political parties in power?


The Omar Khadr case is a textbook example of how the federal Liberals, Canada’s self-described natural governing party, operate.
TORONTOSUN.COM
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http://www.torontosun.com/2017/07/08/liberals-two-faced-on-khadr

Liberals two-faced on Khadr

How the Grits shamelessly changed their tune


lorrie-goldstein
BY LORRIE GOLDSTEIN, TORONTO SUN
FIRST POSTED: SATURDAY, JULY 08, 2017 05:18 PM EDT | UPDATED: SATURDAY, JULY 08, 2017 05:22 PM EDT
omar againOmar Khadr speaks to the media outside his lawyer’s Edmonton home Thursday May 7, 2015. (David Bloom/Edmonton Sun)
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The Omar Khadr case is a textbook example of how the federal Liberals, Canada’s self-described natural governing party, operate.
They do it by hypocritically changing their spots – if you don’t like Liberal principles, hang around for a few minutes, because they’ll have new ones – while blaming controversies on the Conservatives, for which Liberals were responsible.
A brief tour through the highlights of Liberal interactions with Khadr over the years illustrates the point.
It started in 1996 when then-Liberal prime minister Jean Chretien sought assurances from Pakistan’s prime minister, Benazir Bhutto, that Khadr’s father, Ahmed Said Khadr, would be treated fairly while Pakistan had him under arrest on suspicion of the terrorist bombing of the Egyptian embassy in Islamabad.
Bhutto subsequently released Khadr, who returned briefly to Canada, then moved his family to Pakistan, where his sons, including Omar, began weapons training under the Taliban and Osama bin Laden.
As it turned out, Khadr’s father, for whom Chretien naively went to bat, was a close associate of bin Laden, and in 2003 was killed in a firefight with Pakistani security forces.
The year before, Omar was involved in his own firefight with U.S. forces in Afghanistan, in which he was later convicted of hurling the grenade that killed army medic Sgt. First Class Christopher James Speer, and blinded Sgt. Layne Morris in one eye.
The Americans saved the wounded Khadr’s life, who, in 2002 was 15 years old – what the Liberals would later call a “child soldier” – and imprisoned him in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba – which the Liberals would later describe as cruel and unusual punishment.
But at the time, the Jean Chretien and Paul Martin Liberal governments did nothing to help Khadr, other than making a perfunctory request that he not be sent to Guantanamo, which the Americans rejected.
In fact, the Liberals were only to happy to leave Khadr in Guantanamo – embarrassed as they were by Chretien’s intervention on his terrorist father’s behalf.
The Liberals later claimed – after losing power – that they regretted not doing more to help Khadr under their reign.
But in reality, while they were in power, they not only abandoned Khadr, they violated his constitutional rights.
In 2010, the Supreme Court of Canada unanimously ruled Khadr’s constitutional rights to life, liberty and security of the person were repeatedly violated by the Liberal government in 2003 and 2004.
This when the Liberals sent CSIS operatives and foreign affairs officials to interrogate Khadr in Guantanamo, subsequently sharing their information with Khadr’s American captors, knowing they had used sleep deprivation to break Khadr down.
It was only after Stephen Harper and the Conservatives defeated the Liberals in 2006, that the Liberals, now in opposition, demanded the Harper government intercede on Khadr’s behalf over his treatment by the Americans, and their own treatment of him in 2003 and 2004.
The irony, of course, is that the Harper government’s position on Khadr was essentially a continuation of the Liberals’ policy when they were in power.
That the Liberals are now attacking the Conservatives for criticizing the Trudeau government’s decision to give $10.5 million and an official apology to Khadr – for the wrongs done to him by the Liberal government in 2003 and 2004 – is the height of hypocrisy. It’s utterly shameless.
But that’s how Liberals roll.
lgoldstein@postmedia.com


Julie Ali
8 mins

I don't think that any Canadian should feel uncomfortable about the Khadr payout. When government doesn't do it's job it needs to pay for incompetence and outright failures.


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects all Canadians "even when it's uncomfortable," responding to a question about his…
CBC.CA

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No justification is required, Mr. Trudeau for the payout. You don't need to speak about the discomfort of government with reference to this payout. It might be better to speak of government incompetence that lead to this payout instead.

The hypocrisy of Mr. Trudeau is echoed by the conservative's new leader who pontificates that this payout was wrong. It's not wrong. It's the right thing to do. I am not impressed by this new conservative leader who seems to echo Mr. Harper but even less adeptly. Mr. Scheer is twisting this payout as a failure of government to support our troops. It's a ridiculous position. This case was about human rights abuses by our government and has nothing to do with the service provided by the military. Mr. Scheer reminds me of the mess in the USA and hopefully will fade out of the political scene in Canada.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-omar-khadr-1.4196183


 Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said it was "disgusting" for the government to concoct a "secret deal" and hand over millions to a convicted terrorist.
"This payout is a slap in the face to men and women in uniform who face incredible danger every day to keep us safe," he said Friday.


****
The use of politicians of issues to get their voter base riled up for hate is unacceptable.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-omar-khadr-1.4196183


On Khadr, Trudeau says Charter protects all Canadians 'even when it is uncomfortable'

Former Guantanamo Bay detainee received $10.5M this week, sources tell CBC News

CBC News Posted: Jul 08, 2017 9:54 AM ET Last Updated: Jul 08, 2017 11:54 AM ET
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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects all Canadians "even when it is uncomfortable," responding to a question about his government's apology and controversial payout to former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr.
"The Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects all Canadians, every one of us, even when it is uncomfortable. This is not about the details or merits of the Khadr case. When the government violates any Canadian's Charter rights we all end up paying for it," he told reporters in Hamburg, where he's wrapping up the G20 summit.
Khadr — who has been branded a terrorist by some and a child soldier subjected to torture by others — received a $10.5-million cheque Wednesday, sources told CBC News
Trudeau has been travelling all week with stops in Ireland and Scotland, before flying to Germany for the global leaders' summit. Meanwhile, the Khadr payout has dominated headlines back home.
Khadr Payout Interview 20170707
Former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr, 30, is seen in Mississauga, Ont., on Thursday, July 6, 2017. The federal government has paid Khadr $10.5 million and apologized to him for violating his rights during his long ordeal after capture by American forces in Afghanistan in July 2002. (Colin Perkel/Canadian Press)
News of the settlement first leaked late Monday night, but it took until Friday for the government to officially confirm that a settlement had been reached — and Ottawa refused to disclose the amount.
"It is not about previous behaviour on the battlefield in Afghanistan; it is about the acts and other decisions the Canadian government took against Mr. Khadr after he was captured and detained," Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said Friday. "Those facts are not in dispute and there is no doubt about how the Supreme Court views them. The government of Canada offended the most basic standards."
Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said it was "disgusting" for the government to concoct a "secret deal" and hand over millions to a convicted terrorist. "This payout is a slap in the face to men and women in uniform who face incredible danger every day to keep us safe," he said Friday.
Scheer said he believes the Harper government's decision to repatriate Khadr in 2012 was a sufficient response to the Supreme Court's ruling that Khadr's rights were violated.

'Restores a little bit my reputation'

In an interview with CBC News' Rosemary Barton, the Canadian-born Khadr, 30, said he hopes the settlement will help restore his reputation.
"I think it restores a little bit my reputation here in Canada, and I think that's the biggest thing for me," he said.
Khadr was 15 when he was captured by U.S. troops following the confrontation at a suspected al-Qaeda compound in Afghanistan in 2002.
Suspected of throwing the grenade that killed U.S. Sgt. Christopher Speer, he was taken to Guantanamo and ultimately charged with war crimes by a military commission.

In 2010, he pleaded guilty to charges that included murder and was sentenced to eight years plus the time he had already spent in custody. He returned to Canada two years later to serve the remainder of his sentence and was released in May 2015 pending an appeal of his guilty plea, which he said was made under duress.

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