Friday, July 14, 2017

Overall, staffing levels and residents’ ability to receive better quality food and a variety of meals were predominant concerns in both years. In addition, a predominant theme reflected in family members’ comments for many facilities in 2016 was communication between staff and family members. The communication concerns included that family members did not receive timely information about residents when incidents occurred, did not always feel involved in decisions about residents’ care, were not always able to receive resolution to their complaints and concerns, and felt staff did not take the time to communicate information about residents to one another or to become informed before shift change.


If the HQCA survey finds a repeat of the issues from before with no change what is the point in doing these surveys?
Is it all about hoping that the court of public opinion will get the facilities to improve performance?
Since this is the second such survey with the same sort of results, it's pretty clear to me at least that the court of public opinion isn't having any effect.
Maybe the GOA should do it's job?

https://d10k7k7mywg42z.cloudfront.net/assets/59663123edb2f31efa4f5f0a/SLFAM_FINAL_071117.pdf

DESIGNATED SUPPORTIVE LIVING FAMILY EXPERIENCE SURVEY REPORT Provincial Results July 2017
Overall, staffing levels and residents’ ability to receive better quality food and a variety of meals were predominant concerns in both years. In addition, a predominant theme reflected in family members’ comments for many facilities in 2016 was communication between staff and family members. The communication concerns included that family members did not receive timely information about residents when incidents occurred, did not always feel involved in decisions about residents’ care, were not always able to receive resolution to their complaints and concerns, and felt staff did not take the time to communicate information about residents to one another or to become informed before shift change.


We pay for a lot of folks at the HQCA to do productive work for us but instead of deep dish investigation of the problems in the continuing care system which includes the supportive living sites reviewed by residents in this survey-we get Pablum work.
It's troubling but there you go.
The real purpose of these surveys is to hold up the facilities that aren't doing well up to the scrutiny of the public. Most of the public who don't have family in the continuing care system doesn't care about these survey results.
Those of us who do have family in the system are fully aware of the problems which include poor staff:resident ratios, lack of trained staff, lack of staff supports in terms of integrated care teams, lack of supports and services for complex care patients who are stuck in a lower level of care because it is convenient to the health authority to stick them there and lack of time for staff to form relationships with the residents.
But of course the HQCA doesn't look at these problems. It yaps about the same feedback survey after survey.
We're being ripped off.
But there you go.
Nothing can be done about this set of yet more elite folks in power places.
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These HQCA surveys are a waste of public dollars. Instead of asking residents to yap about the same concerns --staffing and food --year after year, the HQCA should do deep dish investigations of the continuing care system including the problem of retribution.
But I guess this isn't the purpose of the HQCA is it?
The purpose of the HQCA as well as the Health Advocates, the Seniors Advocate, the Mental Health advocate, the Ombudsman, the Child and Youth advocate, the Protection for Persons in Care Office, the Patient Relations offices at AHS and Covenant Health is basically to cover up for poor performance in the system.
We're unlikely to find out the real dirt from any of these offices. As for the HQCA? Some folks are making big bucks in this place for junk surveys.

Families looking for assisted living facilities in Alberta may want to comb through a new Health Quality Council of Alberta report that rates the quality of life in…
EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM

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http://edmontonjournal.com/news/local-news/quality-of-assisted-living-homes-inconsistent-across-alberta-survey-finds


Quality of assisted living homes inconsistent across Alberta, survey finds


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Families looking for assisted living facilities in Alberta may want to comb through a new Health Quality Council of Alberta report that rates the quality of life in retirement homes.
The council surveyed 2,870 residents and 4,629 family members of people living in supportive facilities across the province, and found experiences ranging from delightful to frustrating.
“There’s lots of opportunity to improve out there,” Andrew Neuner, CEO of the Health Quality Council, said Thursday.
In a 2016 survey, researchers asked residents and relatives dozens of questions: Did the staff treat them with respect? Did they have to wait too long for help with eating or drinking? Did the room look and smell clean? How was the food?
The council assigned each facility a rating out of 10 based on the responses. Residents’ ratings varied from a 6 out of 10 to 9.6 out of 10, suggesting some organizations are doing a better job than others, Neuner said.
They also found the location of the facility, or who ran the facility — private, a non-profit organization, or Alberta Health Services — didn’t significantly influence the quality of care.
The survey only looked at the 164 Alberta facilities where residents needed some help with daily living, but live in private units.
It’s important for Albertans to participate in the survey so organizations get detailed, constructive feedback that aren’t based on anecdotal complaints, Geralyn L’Heureux, whose brother and mother both live in supportive care, said Thursday.
When her mother moved into a public facility in Lethbridge nearly two years ago, the staff changed so often, she would never see the same person twice, L’Heureux said. It was far from ideal for her mother, who has dementia. The facility has since changed how it handles staffing, and the care is “really good,” she said.
Her brother’s move into assisted living has provided the perfect mix of independence, chances to socialize and reassurance that someone frequently checks on him.
Family members must become advocates when loved ones need extra care, she said. When shopping for a facility, request a tour and ask plenty of questions, she said.
On the survey, the most common complaint from residents and their families was about the quality of food.
People bemoaned the lack of variety, the taste and texture, and the lack of ethnic foods available, Neuner said.
A lack of staff and uncleanliness also prompted some dissatisfaction.
People were most pleased with the relationships with staff and condition of the buildings, as well as laundry services.
This is the council’s second time rating Alberta supportive care facilities. The first survey was in 2013, and had similar results.

Julie Ali · 

I am curious why the HQCA bothers to do these surveys since nothing appears to be done by the GOA to improve the situation of residents in the continuing care system. Is the role of such surveys to simply indicate to the public that facilities are being held accountable by exposing the feelings of their residents to the court of public opinion? Isn't this a rather poor way to get facilities to improve their performance?
Would it not be better for the GOA to ensure that audits are done yearly and put these audits up in a public website so that we can see what the government is finding in terms of non-compliances and what is done as follow up action?
When feedback from residents is not followed up with a course of action as is supposedly required with audits then it's pretty useless in my opinion to be spending this money in busy work.
Far better to give the money to the poor residents.
LikeReplyJust now
Ruby Benson
Time to bring some class back to nursing. Scrubs that look like pjs are unacceptable, cartoon scrubs in an adult wards is insulting to the adult residents, messy hair is unacceptable, speaking English in the whole building is a must not only because English is the language we speak here but out of respect for the dementia patients who often relive war time moments and confuse anything other then English with the language of war time. Hiring enough staff to actually take the time it needs to allow a person to stay in the washroom/ eat food/ get dressed or even work through a demanding mental health moment is a must and pay the staff well. Looking at health care aides as part of the nursing staff as they were in the past is not only respectful but a reality. Giving health health care aides their real titles back of nursing attendances is more professional. Allowing complaints to go past the building manager is important for actually problem solving and holding accountability.
LikeReply111 hrs
Ruth Maria Adria
So after an extensive, costly, year long survey, CEO of the Health Quality Council has publicly stated, "There’s lots of opportunity to improve out there”. So what is being done to remedy this?
UnlikeReply210 hrs
Dianne Slade · 

No surprise. The conditions in some are horrific. Most are short staffed. Some of these seniors rarely see visitors. The privately owned ones are too expensive for most people.
UnlikeReply112 hrs
Sherry Bernard
They Wouldn't be Short Staffed if Their Hours were Normal 8 hour Shifts, 5 days a Week, When Thru are Hired for full Time Hours they Only Work for 14 Days out of the Month, That is What they Call Full Time, I know this because I have friends on this field and they regretted taking Full Time Hours as opposed to On Call where they pick up many shifts when others go on holiday or need a day for appointments etc. Bring Normal Full Time Hours Back
LikeReply9 hrs
Tony B Cyr · 

its totally inconsistant country wide, give youir heads a shake..
LikeReply20 hrsEdited

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