Thursday, July 27, 2017

#LetTheCutsBegin!------Outgoing Wildrose Leader Brian Jean, who is campaigning to lead the province’s far-right Frankenparty, has vowed to lead Albertans back into the health care wilderness where they wandered with Ralph Klein a generation ago.--------------Friends of Medicare 11 hrs · "many lower-level AHS managers do in fact deliver front-line health care, and cuts in those “administrative” ranks will directly and negatively impact the level of care that patients receive from front-line nurses and health care aides."


#LetTheCutsBegin!---Although unionized workers in Alberta are a pampered crew who are immune to the roller coaster ride of workers in the private sector, they need to understand the limitations of taxpayers. We're not going to be paying for the luxury lives of folks in the public sector any more. We're tired of it.
As families we have to pay for our bills. When we can't pay for stuff we don't buy the stuff. It's the same thing for government or it should be the same for government. Don't spend what you don't have. Why should working families go without benefits, pension plans and wages even to support the luxury lifestyles of the completely clueless government and ABC (agency, boards and commission) workers? I'm saying we won't do it.
Trust me. Once Mr. Jean becomes premier, there will be a lot of folks who have to have deliverables or they will have to work in the private sector where families are hurting badly and we're not going to be hurting to the point of subsidizing the elite in our public sector. Nope.
"many lower-level AHS managers do in fact deliver front-line health care, and cuts in those “administrative” ranks will directly and negatively impact the level of care that patients receive from front-line nurses and health care aides."
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Bal Boora Jean's statements are senseless and outright fiction!!!

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John Stolarski Brian Jean is a political con artist, selling fantasies for a vote.

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Julie Ali My comments on the excessive costs of AHS can be repeated here: http://edmontonjournal.com/.../saturdays-letters-ahs...
Julie Ali · University of Alberta
Re: Saturday's letters: AHS staffing strikes the right balance

I remain unconvinced that AHS staffing levels or the costs for staffing is reasonable or sustainable. I feel that there are too many layers of bureaucrats and an executive staff at AHS that is overpaid for few deliverables. AHS is unresponsive to families and does not have a culture that is patient centred or one that practices a "just society" model.

I believe that both the culture and salary scales need adjustment by citizens. 
If we look at the top heavy administrators we can see they earn hefty salaries.
How much are executive staff overpaid? 
I had a look at the costs for the executive staff for 2014-2015 here:

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.../ahs-pub-2014-2015...
ALBERTA HEALTH SERVICES
Annual Report
2014-15

It is frankly mind boggling to me at least that a small group of executive staff could cost us $6.621 million. 

How is it possible that 22 members of an executive team--who may not even work full hours--can earn a lottery return on their labour? 

$6.621 million for 22 people is a tad rich for this stay at home mummy. 

There is no mention in the press release that provided a summary of the annual report--of other costs of this team such as the executive supplemental pension plan and supplemental executive retirement plan.

I see no figures in the Alberta Health Services Annual Report for 2014-15 for yet other costs such as expense payouts. We get some figures for the ridiculous severance payments that were made. They were $2.9 million in the previous fiscal year and have been brought down to $196,000 for 2014-15 --possibly because citizens were fed up and weren't going to take it any longer. 

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.../ne-rls-2015-06-30...

June 30, 2015 AHS releases Consolidated Financial Statements

Total expenses for executive salaries and benefits amounted to $6.621 million in 2014-15 compared to $9.984 million the previous fiscal year – a 34 per cent decrease. AHS bases executive compensation on the median of Canada’s public sector market. Executive severance and termination benefits amounted to $196,000 in 2014-15 compared to $2.9 million the previous fiscal year – a 93 per cent decrease. 
*********

While Dr. Yiu may say this is reasonable compensation and costs--for her-- she is speaking from the perspective of one of the elite in our society where such salaries and compensation packages may seem reasonable. 

For ordinary citizens who are making minimum wages or even private business owners who have none of these exorbitant returns for their labour, such costs appear inflated, unreasonable and frankly in need of downsizing.

I note here that there has already been a downsizing of costs in terms of executive remuneration as well as in other inflated benefits such as severance; it appears that the outrage of the public is sufficient to quell the chatter of these sorts of financial arrangements being par for the course. 

So, if there has been a downward movement in costs, then there is no reason for Dr. Yiu to suggest that just because AHS is low that this is fine. In my opinion, they are not fine. They are excessive. 

http://edmontonjournal.com/.../saturdays-letters-ahs...
According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, AHS’ administration costs at 3.2 per cent are among the lowest in Canada. 

*********************

Based on the current fiscal challenges, it is not outrageous for citizens to now ask for further diminution of the costs of the executives at AHS or for that matter for all the staff employed by AHS. 

Besides the excessive payments to executive staff and the unknown amount to the remaining leadership team of 64--there should be decreased payments to other staff at AHS. 

We simply can't afford these salaries, benefits and pension plans any longer. We are spending more than we take in and how much longer do you think ordinary Albertans like myself who get poor service from AHS--for high tax burdens will put up with this inequity? We won't put up with it. It is simply not fair.

And if families in Riverbend don't feel we are getting value for the major tax dollars we pay for AHS or government itself, what about the other families who experience far greater job and money insecurity? 

We feel that taxpayers are being burdened while the people in the public sector are being coddled. This state of affairs may only be changed by changing the political party in the next provincial election. 

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.../ne-rls-2015-06-30...

2014-15 salaries, benefits and executive compensation Salaries and benefits amounted to $7.532 billion compared to a budget of $7.348 billion, a difference of $184 million or 2.5 per cent.
Like · Reply · 1 · Apr 17, 2016 5:23pm

Randy Kish
Julie, I guess Verna glossed over a few facts in trying to make her point....
Unlike · Reply · 1 · Apr 20, 2016 8:24pm

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http://albertapolitics.ca/2017/07/brian-jean-vows-lead-alberta-back-health-care-wilderness-wandered-ralph-klein/



DAVID CLIMENHAGA 24 HOURS AGO 18 COMMENTS

BRIAN JEAN VOWS TO LEAD ALBERTA BACK INTO THE HEALTH CARE WILDERNESS WHERE WE WANDERED WITH RALPH KLEIN

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PHOTOS: Calgary General Hospital at the moment it was blown to smithereens in November 1992 by Ralph Klein’s conservative government (Photo: City of Calgary). Below: Outgoing Wildrose leader and United Conservative Party leadership candidate Brian Jean, former Alberta Health Services CEO Vickie Kaminski and current AHS CEO Verna Yiu.
Outgoing Wildrose Leader Brian Jean, who is campaigning to lead the province’s far-right Frankenparty, has vowed to lead Albertans back into the health care wilderness where they wandered with Ralph Klein a generation ago.
Alberta is still recovering from that misadventure.
Roughly one half of all Alberta hospital beds were closed during the worst years of Conservative premier Klein’s health care “reform,” between the end of 1992 and 1995. Very few of these beds ever reopened, even though the province’s population has doubled since that health care disaster.
The impact is well understood: years of chronic Emergency Room waits, crumbling infrastructure, stratospheric replacement costs, and now a looming staffing crisis as the Baby Boom generation of health care professionals prepares to retire without the experienced replacements who were driven out of the province by Mr. Klein’s destructive and ultimately ineffective policies.
Nevertheless, in introducing his platform to lead the so-called United Conservative Party, Mr. Jean pledged to make $2.6 billion in instant cuts to Alberta’s public sector by freezing salaries, leaving the jobs done by retiring caregivers and other public employees unfilled, and firing managers, many of whom are in fact front-line heath care workers.
According to Mr. Jean, this is supposed to take place throughout the public sector, but in case you doubted his intent with regard to health care, he singled out Alberta Health Services for special mention in his plans. Remember as well that even if he fired the entire provincial civil service, basically unchanged in size since Statistics Canada compiled these numbers in 2011, he would barely save enough money to keep his promise. So health care inevitably would be a significant target.
Mr. Jean would compound the damage by cutting the government’s revenue base and attacking the rights of working people, other typical discredited economic nostrums of the Republicanized Canadian political right. In addition, of course, there would be more cuts later. Typical of conservative politicians, though, Mr. Jean omitted the details.
This is a man who just days ago was telling a tame Postmedia columnist that “gone are the days when hard-right governments are going to be successful in Alberta.” Well, forget about that! Apparently Mr. Jean got a message from the UCP’s Tea Party base, from his cynical campaign advisors, or both.
Either that, or, worse, he really is the “moderate” in this race. Candidate Doug Schweitzer excoriated Mr. Jean for not going far enough, as has UCP Finance Critic Derek Fildebrandt.
Mr. Fildebrandt, at least, has promised to say precisely where he would make cuts. This may sound like a virtue, but more likely it’s a shrewd calculation that his supporters actually enjoy the prospect of hurting their neighbours, especially those with public sector jobs.
Outgoing Progressive Conservative Leader Jason Kenney, who will announce his candidacy soon, has lately kept quiet about his plans – although he has vowed in the past to repeal every single piece of legislation passed by Premier Rachel Notley’s NDP government, including, presumably, those required by Supreme Court rulings.
If you’re looking for some reasonably balanced thoughts about the money spent on administration in Alberta health care, look no farther than the last two chief executives of Alberta Health Services.
In a letter to the editor of the Edmonton Sun in February 2015, then-CEO Vickie Kaminski, a conservative appointee, pointed out, accurately, that when it comes to directing spending to front-line care instead of administration, no province does better than Alberta.
“Managers only make up three per cent of our AHS workforce,” Ms. Kaminski said in response to a misinformed column by a right-wing Sun columnist. “That includes the lowest-level manager right up to the executive leadership team, including the President and CEO.” She based her arguments on statistics from the respected Canadian Institute for Health Information.
A letter to the Edmonton Journal from Dr. Verna Yiu made the same points in April 2016 in response to another volley of right-wing misrepresentations about the cost of administration at AHS.
As an aside, it seems ham handed for AHS’s communications staff to have used almost identical words in both letters, although the facts had not changed between the two. As is often said in this space, you’re not really plagiarizing if you’re plagiarizing yourself. Just the same, someone should have made the effort to produce a different letter for Dr. Yiu, or to acknowledge that the same points had been made by her predecessor.
Unstated by either Ms. Kaminski or Dr. Yiu, though, was the fact many lower-level AHS managers do in fact deliver front-line health care, and cuts in those “administrative” ranks will directly and negatively impact the level of care that patients receive from front-line nurses and health care aides.
Regardless, while facts may not count for much in the post-truth environment of the UCP, they should nevertheless be part of the general provincial discussion about what the cuts proposed by Mr. Jean and his cohorts would mean for health care in Alberta.
The brutal cuts proposed by Mr. Jean would mean the same thing as the brutal cuts imposed by Mr. Klein in the 1990s: Worse health outcomes, longer wait times, crammed Emergency Rooms, closed rural and urban facilities, demoralized health care professionals, another lost generation of nurses who take their skills to greener pastures, and a general collapse into the general dysfunction from which we are only now recovering.
Moreover, over the long term, fixing the damage done would cost more than continuing to run the system with a steady hand.
These dystopic outcomes, of course, would be used to justify calls for a more expensive, less fair system of privatized health care – which may, of course, be the whole idea.
CATEGORIES ALBERTA POLITICS





  • BOB RAYNARD • 14 Hours Ago
    Until the last few days, I had thought Brian Jean was emerging as a voice of moderation, and as a result, ‘electability’ in a general election. Instead he seems to be joining the race to the extreme right.
    In addition to severe cuts, Mr. Jean has also promised a referendum on photo radar and equalization payments. Lumped together, it makes for an interesting analysis of his target demographic.
    • VAL • 10 Hours Ago
      he not yet clarify how he would save 2.6B so why do you already jump with conclusion?
      Alberta healthcare 34% above average in Canada but have this reflected on quality of service 34% better in comparison to other provinces?
      but we have quite a bunch of public “servants”, who’s salary and absence of accountability, does turn green faced envy in private sector.
      • NORTHERN LOON • 6 Hours Ago
        Are you aware that the ‘Public Service’ is the same size as it was after the Klein era cuts despite massive population growth? Where do you get the idea that the public services “salary and absence of accountability, does turn green faced envy in the private sector” makes any sense literally and figuratively?
      • MURPHY • 5 Hours Ago
        Pedicates, Latka. It’s the key to your next step in learning English.
      • EXPAT ALBERTAN • 4 Hours Ago
        Sorry, but who exactly are you comparing? You might be interested to know that deputy ministers in the federal public service make around $300K. So how much do their private sector compatriots make? Well, first you have to define who their equals are in the private sector. Since there are no private sector deputy ministers, the best analogue would be the CEO of a Fortune 500 company (my logic here is that DMs help run a country, which is much greater responsibility than running a company… any company). Given the untold millions the Fortune 500 set makes… even when they run a company into the ground, I think either you are getting a bargain for your tax dollars or someone is grossly underpaid.
        But, really, this isn’t about comparing apples to apples, is it? It’s a scarecrow (a fake, poorly constructed replica of an argument) that is built up to be easily knocked down.
  • JERRYMACGP • 14 Hours Ago
    Managers and senior administrators have important roles to play. Without them, direct-care staff would not have the resources, both human and material, to do their jobs; nor would they have the policy guidance they need to do them well. Direct-care staff need people to sign payroll and hire replacements for those that move, change jobs or retire; they need people to sign purchase orders for consumable supplies and replacement equipment; they need people to lead policy development to ensure best practices in the organization; they need people to look at population and demographic trends to determine changes in service levels in different parts of the province. Large organizations like AHS also need financial monitoring staff to ensure value for money and to prevent misappropriation of public funds, always a risk when dealing with fallible human beings.
    None of the people carrying out the roles I have just described work at the bedside, but all of them are essential to the
    functioning of the system. And, make no mistake, the kind of privatized health care system Mr Jean appears to favour would need all of those same people, and probably many more; if you don’t believe me on this, just look south of the border, where the health care system is burdened with far more administrative overhead than anywhere in Canada.
  • J.E. MOLNAR • 13 Hours Ago
    Nothing awe-inspiring or new from Jean folks. Old pig — new lipstick.
    When you base your entire leadership campaign on dystopian demagoguery you can expect harsh media and public criticism. That’s exactly what Jean is enduring these days because of his ill-advised practice of preaching kamikaze economics.
    • BOB RAYNARD • 5 Hours Ago
      Thanks for the link, J.E. After I read it I found another link to an item by Jim Storrie. While its content appears to report a new low in politics, it also reports that Brian Jean has recently hired a Rebel co-founder named Hamish Marshall to be his campaign manager. This probably goes a long way toward explaining Brian Jean’s shift to the right.
      Every new, and more extreme, policy these guys announce moves them closer to becoming UCP leader and farther away from winning a general election. Oops, I already forgot about Trump.
    • FARMER B • 1 Hour Ago
      In a July 20,2017 Opinion piece in the Calgary Herald by Chris Nelson titled NDP job strategy could be working for them, Chris discusses Alberta’s job stats since Jan. 2015. We have lost 90,000 energy jobs and replaced them with 78,000 public service jobs in health, education, and public administration. Now that imo is kamikaze economics.
  • VAL • 11 Hours Ago
    “A letter to the Edmonton Journal from Dr. Verna Yiu”
    ====================================================
    i guess it’s hard to find anything decent if you use her to support your point of view.
    sure, she’s exemplary conscious and patriotic local top manager.
    only she seems prefers to keep her $568,321 salary and don’t like to settle for “humble” $100K and redirect remaining $468K to hire 8-9 additional nurses.
    what a hypocrisy.
    • NORTHERN LOON • 7 Hours Ago
      You have no idea of what it costs to hire a nurse, so perhaps you need to be more careful about presumptuous commentary.
      • MURPHY • 5 Hours Ago
        Latka figures a nurse should pull down $50k per. Don’t want them to have jumped-up nurses tooling around in new Elantras like they own the place.
      • VAL • 2 Hours Ago
        so you believe $500+k absolutely justified salary for humble public “servant”?
        in regard of “costs to hire a nurse”, nationwide it’s $61k – $76k for registered nurse.
        Alberta $67k – $84k
        as of april 2016 undergraduate nurse – $ 27 per hour which translates to average $40K before tax.
    • MSEDMONTON • 6 Hours Ago
      But how come when their were machinists and boilermakers and well-service people (with their per diems and vehicle and tool allowances) making more than these nurses (and don’t forget those private sector bonuses and other perks), that was all right? The argument I heard was that they were entrepreneurial and when times were good they got amazing wages and when times were lean they took their chances. And if people in the public sector didn’t like it they should shut up and get real jobs. Now that times are tight a lot of what I hear is that the everyone should be brought down to the lowest level. Doesn’t seem right to me.
  • ATHABASCAN • 10 Hours Ago
    Brian Jean is delusional if he thinks he’ll be the leader of the Unite the White party.
    The reality is he’ll end up being Kenney’s lapdog, just like McKay was for Harper.
    Dear Mr, Jean,
    Kenney’s intention is to oust YOU. Maybe you are OK with that. If that is so, don’t pretend this will be an honest race for the leadership of this frankenparty.
  • RONMAC • 9 Hours Ago
    Most revealing will their position be on lab testing.
    Recently AHS annouced plans to buy out the private laboratory testing company Dynalife and transfer its services back to the province when the current contract expires in 2022.
    Alert readers will recall last year current Health minister Sarah Hoffman cancelling a $3-billion contract with Australian company, Sonic Healthcare, awarded by the previous PC government. Sonic was supposed to have taken over from Dynalife, a highly controversial move at the time. Some wondered why would the province be outsourcing services to an outside foreign company, especially one that needed to pay stock dividends to its shareholders.
    More recently an Australian public watchdog group Grattan Institute put out a report claiming the Austrailian gov’t was paying too much for services provided by Sonic Healthcare and patients needed to be protected from added fees. It was a hot button issue in Australia’s election.
    So the question that needs asking will the UPC roll back those NDP plans and privitize lab services. More to the point, will it reinstate the Sonic Healthcare contract.
  • DAVID • 9 Hours Ago
    I am not sure how Mr. Jean plans to balance the budget with his $ 2.6 billion in cuts, given the deficit is far larger than that. It is a mathematical mystery to me, unless he actually means to cut something like $2.6 billion each year for several years. However, that was not clear to me from what he said.
    I suppose we should be thankful, this is the first hint of real policy from the right. I feel Mr. Jean’s low ball estimate of the cuts, is just a ruse to reassure unsuspecting voters that the cuts do not need to be brutal. However, some in his party are already saying his plan is too modest. I am sure if Mr. Jean gets a chance to implement his plan, the cuts will somewhere along the line change from modest to brutal. Either that or the deficit will not be eliminated or safely after the election he will conclude that a sales tax is not such a bad thing after all. I think brutal cuts will be the most likely option, with the misleading message “this will only hurt a little bit, you will barely feel it” being used to entice voters to support much more slashing than they are comfortable with.
    Big picture – Alberta’s energy revenues are about 10 billion a year lower than in the Klein era, so we have a deficit now. Its really quite simple. It is not due to government over spending or poor management as the right wing likes to pretend. It will take either brutal cuts or new taxes to get rid of that deficit in the short term. Those that pretend otherwise are not being honest with Albertans.
  • BRETT • 5 Hours Ago
    It is really easy for Brian Jean to make these comments when he is not in power.
    I cannot help but wonder why he is not spending more time on his own constituency issues. Health care and hospital facitlities in Ft. Mac. are in crisis. ALberta Health’s lastest plan to send a desperately needed pedeatrician….they are sending one up who is 7 months or so pregnant….then she will take time off. Mothers who deliver prior to 30 weeks cannot deliver in Ft. Mac…they need to go to Edmonton. Most WANT to go to Edmonton.
    So Brian…would you cut health care in Ft. Mac to balance the budget? Why not ask some of your constituents…especially those with young families???
    Mr. Jean is such a hypocrite. He needs to work and stick up for the folks who elected him. If he cannot do his day job he should resign so that he can focus his full attention on becoming an also ran, Jason Kenneys gofer, or an apologist for the far right wing nut cases in his party.
    Health care in Ft. Mac is in critical condition. It needs attention Mr Jean. And more that just your assistant sitting in her offfice.
  • JULIE ALI • 1 Min Ago
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    Costs for AHS executive staff and managers are too high. I support Mr. Jean’s future moves to cut managers and other staff both in government and all the ABCs (agencies, boards and commissions). While this might sound irresponsible to public sector workers it is actually being responsible and realistic. We can’t keep going into debt forever; we know this as families and so why should government be exempt from the same frugal practices of spending only as much money as what comes in?
    Private sector workers have no sort of permanence or luxuries like those present in the public sector. So why may I ask should we be working for the folks in the public sector? It’s time to provide reasonable returns for labour in Alberta. In this matter I am not speaking about the poorest as I think an increase in the minimum wage is required.
    What I am saying is that the elite are being unfairly compensated for no good reason that I can determine. Some of the managers have no deliverables that I can determine no matter where they are placed–in government, AHS or Covenant Health. Please don’t say that the CEOs at AHS and Covenant Health earn their salaries–I am pretty sure they can do the same work at lower salaries. And if they won’t, then hire folks who will.


http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/letters/saturdays-letters-ahs-staffing-strikes-the-right-balance



Saturday's letters: AHS staffing strikes the right balance

Published on: April 16, 2016 | Last Updated: April 16, 2016 6:00 AM MDT
Dr. Verna Yiu, interm AHS CEO (left), says in a letter to the editor that critics are wrong to claim the provincial health authority is top-heavy with managers. Yiu is pictured at a January 2016 meeting with AHS board chairwoman Linda Hughes.
Dr. Verna Yiu, interm AHS CEO (left), says in a letter to the editor that critics are wrong to claim the provincial health authority is top-heavy with managers. Yiu is pictured at a January 2016 meeting with AHS board chairwoman Linda Hughes. ED KAISER / EDMONTON JOURNAL
Re. “Alberta’s budget can set tone for recovery; Look to B.C.,” Doug Firby and Colleen Collins, April 13
Alberta Health Services (AHS) periodically finds itself criticized for its size and the fact 40 per cent of the province’s annual operating budget is allocated to health-care supports and services.
Typically, our critics incorrectly claim AHS has top-heavy administration and too much bureaucracy. But the facts tell a different story.
According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, AHS’ administration costs at 3.2 per cent are among the lowest in Canada. AHS has 99,953 employees dedicated to providing health care to Albertans who are led by a small senior leadership team of 64, including 12 members of an executive team. The number of senior leaders has reduced by more than half from the days of the former health regions.
AHS has 3,372 managers, meaning that managers make up 3.3 per cent of our employees. Many of these administrators work on the front lines of care. When it comes to directing health dollars toward patient care, no province does more than Alberta.

Dr. Verna Yiu, interim president and CEO, AHS
Julie Ali · 
Re: Saturday's letters: AHS staffing strikes the right balance

I remain unconvinced that AHS staffing levels or the costs for staffing is reasonable or sustainable. I feel that there are too many layers of bureaucrats and an executive staff at AHS that is overpaid for few deliverables. AHS is unresponsive to families and does not have a culture that is patient centred or one that practices a "just society" model.

I believe that both the culture and salary scales need adjustment by citizens.
If we look at the top heavy administrators we can see they earn hefty salaries.
How much are executive staff overpaid?
I had a look at the costs for the executive staff for 2014-2015 here:

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.../ahs-pub-2014-2015...
ALBERTA HEALTH SERVICES
Annual Report
2014-15

It is frankly mind boggling to me at least that a small group of executive staff could cost us $6.621 million.

How is it possible that 22 members of an executive team--who may not even work full hours--can earn a lottery return on their labour?

$6.621 million for 22 people is a tad rich for this stay at home mummy.

There is no mention in the press release that provided a summary of the annual report--of other costs of this team such as the executive supplemental pension plan and supplemental executive retirement plan.

I see no figures in the Alberta Health Services Annual Report for 2014-15 for yet other costs such as expense payouts. We get some figures for the ridiculous severance payments that were made. They were $2.9 million in the previous fiscal year and have been brought down to $196,000 for 2014-15 --possibly because citizens were fed up and weren't going to take it any longer.

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.../ne-rls-2015-06-30...

June 30, 2015 AHS releases Consolidated Financial Statements

Total expenses for executive salaries and benefits amounted to $6.621 million in 2014-15 compared to $9.984 million the previous fiscal year – a 34 per cent decrease. AHS bases executive compensation on the median of Canada’s public sector market. Executive severance and termination benefits amounted to $196,000 in 2014-15 compared to $2.9 million the previous fiscal year – a 93 per cent decrease.
*********

While Dr. Yiu may say this is reasonable compensation and costs--for her-- she is speaking from the perspective of one of the elite in our society where such salaries and compensation packages may seem reasonable.

For ordinary citizens who are making minimum wages or even private business owners who have none of these exorbitant returns for their labour, such costs appear inflated, unreasonable and frankly in need of downsizing.

I note here that there has already been a downsizing of costs in terms of executive remuneration as well as in other inflated benefits such as severance; it appears that the outrage of the public is sufficient to quell the chatter of these sorts of financial arrangements being par for the course.

So, if there has been a downward movement in costs, then there is no reason for Dr. Yiu to suggest that just because AHS is low that this is fine. In my opinion, they are not fine. They are excessive.

http://edmontonjournal.com/.../saturdays-letters-ahs...
According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, AHS’ administration costs at 3.2 per cent are among the lowest in Canada.

*********************

Based on the current fiscal challenges, it is not outrageous for citizens to now ask for further diminution of the costs of the executives at AHS or for that matter for all the staff employed by AHS.

Besides the excessive payments to executive staff and the unknown amount to the remaining leadership team of 64--there should be decreased payments to other staff at AHS.

We simply can't afford these salaries, benefits and pension plans any longer. We are spending more than we take in and how much longer do you think ordinary Albertans like myself who get poor service from AHS--for high tax burdens will put up with this inequity? We won't put up with it. It is simply not fair.

And if families in Riverbend don't feel we are getting value for the major tax dollars we pay for AHS or government itself, what about the other families who experience far greater job and money insecurity?

We feel that taxpayers are being burdened while the people in the public sector are being coddled. This state of affairs may only be changed by changing the political party in the next provincial election.

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.../ne-rls-2015-06-30...

2014-15 salaries, benefits and executive compensation Salaries and benefits amounted to $7.532 billion compared to a budget of $7.348 billion, a difference of $184 million or 2.5 per cent.
LikeReply127 minsEdited
Randy Kish
Julie, I guess Verna glossed over a few facts in trying to make her point....
UnlikeReply1Apr 20, 2016 8:24pm


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