Thursday, July 6, 2017

One of the oddities in the upcoming vote is that the PC rules require only that a simple majority of its members vote in favour while the grassroots-driven Wildrose requires 75 per cent of its members to approve.


My advice to the Wildrose Party is do not merge with the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta.
It's not necessary and if you do merge there will be future trouble if not current ones.
Why aren't Wildrose Party folks asking the PCs about the Tapcal Trust Fund?
Why aren't the WR folks asking the PCs about pollution problems of the Jessica Ernst sort where we have well water on fire after fracking?
Why in fact are the WR folks dealing with this party after the Sky Palace fiasco and the billions of dollars wasted by this party? Why? I guess it is all about power at all costs and damn the history of incompetence, poor governance and arrogance of the PCs.
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Hope the merger fails. The PCs had 44 years to do the job correctly and they did the job arrogantly, wastefully and without proper representation. Now they want us to take them back. Why? I'd say we'd just repeat the past of poor governance.
Cut the cord. Let the PCs go. And just be a standalone Wildrose Party. Unless of course, the Wildrose Party wants to be like the PCs with their Tapcal Fund antidemocratic history?
Is it power at all costs?

What happens if a clear majority of the two parties vote for a merger but the deal still fails because it gets less than the 75 per cent approval needed from Wildrose…
EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM

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What happens if a clear majority of the two parties vote for a merger on July 22 but the deal still manages to fail because it gets less than the 75 per cent approval needed from Wildrose members?

With a little more than two weeks until the unite-the-right vote, here’s the question that’s keeping officials of the Wildrose and Progressive Conservatives awake at…
EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM

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This comment will also be posted to edmontonjournal.com.
Julie Ali What happens? The sky will fall and we're all stuck with voting for either the Wildrose Party or the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta. My choice is the Wildrose Party without the baggage of the PCs but this is Alberta and who knows what will happen?

http://edmontonjournal.com/news/politics/graham-thomson-pc-and-wildrose-parties-eye-plan-b-should-merger-vote-fall-narrowly-short



Graham Thomson: PC and Wildrose parties eye Plan B should merger vote fall narrowly short

Published on: July 5, 2017 | Last Updated: July 5, 2017 3:30 PM MDT
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Rocky Mountain Unification
Jason Kenney held a town hall meeting in Rocky Mountain House to promote the July 22 unification vote.
Rocky Mountain House — With a little more than two weeks until the unite-the-right vote, here’s the question that’s keeping officials of the Wildrose and Progressive Conservatives awake at night.
What happens if a clear majority of the two parties vote for a merger July 22, but the deal still fails because it gets less than the 75 per cent approval needed from Wildrose members?
That would be a nightmare scenario for officials who are desperate to get a merger approved and who are just as desperate to avoid a civil war between the two conservative parties should the merger fail.
That’s why they’re trying to find a Plan B.
We got a glimpse of their thinking Tuesday in Rocky Mountain House when about 150 people turned up for a 90-minute meeting organized by PC Leader Jason Kenney at the gymnasium of the Rocky Christian School.
These are people so fed up with the NDP government that they’d rather spend an hour and a half inside a school gymnasium listening to politicians than outside enjoying a glorious summer evening.
Actually, they went into overtime, spending more than two hours listening to Kenney and local Wildrose MLA Jason Nixon discuss unification. The vast majority of the questions weren’t about policy or whether a merger is a good idea — the members of the audience just wanted to know the easiest way to cast a ballot and, if they belong to both parties, whether they can vote twice (they can).
One of the oddities in the upcoming vote is that the PC rules require only that a simple majority of its members vote in favour while the grassroots-driven Wildrose requires 75 per cent of its members to approve.
Officials in both parties are afraid there might be enough contrarian-minded Wildrosers to torpedo the deal.
So, they’re mulling over a plan to salvage some sort of unification agreement if the merger stumbles.
They’re looking specifically at what happens if the Wildrose vote falls just short of the 75 per cent threshold for approval.
Kenney raised the possibility of a Plan B when he suggested a “no” vote might not actually mean “no.” It all depends how close to “yes” it gets.
Jason Kenney held a town-hall meeting in Rocky Mountain House on July 4, 2017. GRAHAM THOMSON
“If we have a no vote, we’re going to have to assess the circumstances,” said Kenney. “Imagine that both parties have a big no vote, then that would be totally different than one of the parties having a tiny no vote. I mean, if Wildrose members vote 74.5 per cent yes and the PCs vote 90 per cent yes, that’s a lot different than them voting 90 per cent no. So, we’re going to have to wait and see where the members are if there is a no vote on one side and then figure out how we go forward.”
Kenney said he would “remain open to other forms of co-operation,” such as non-competition agreements in some ridings. At the end of the day, it’s all about defeating the NDP in the next election for the Wildrose and PCs.
Nixon agreed, saying an almost-yes vote by Wildrose members “would be a time for both parties to have a serious talk.”
Nixon, though, is confident more than 75 per cent of Wildrosers will vote yes.
Others at the Tuesday’s meeting weren’t so sure.
Sheila Mizera is a Wildrose member and town councillor in Rocky Mountain House.
When asked if she thinks at least 75 per cent of Wildrosers will support unification with the PCs, she was blunt: “No, I don’t think they will.”
Mizera said the same right-wing Wildrose members who caused so much trouble for then-leader Danielle Smith in 2014 when she tried to moderate the party are still active — and they don’t want to merge with the PCs.
They’re so “far, far, far right,” said Mizera, that they view the unification deal as something of a left-wing plot to dilute the Wildrose movement.
Mizera desperately wants unification to go through and suggests, if enough Wildrosers vote yes, the deal will be pushed through even if it falls short of 75 per cent.
“You can’t put this much time and effort and energy into making this shift in Alberta politics and for .5 per cent, or even one per cent or two per cent, throw it down the drain,” she said. “Push the merger through.”
That is highly unlikely to happen because it would violate the Wildrose constitution. But Mizera is not alone in her pessimism about Plan A stumbling at the July 22 vote. That’s why officials in both parties are trying to find a Plan B.
gthomson@postmedia.com




Julie Ali · 

It would be interesting if the merger fails as I hope it does. I don't think the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta was productive in government and I don't want to see them back in any format.

If the Wildrose Party stays as it is -which appears to be rather undisciplined they won't also get into power.

The NDP folks aren't any different than the PCs except with better spin.

So what is left? Not much. It's troubling but there you go. I guess this explains the failure of many citizens to vote in elections. The elected representatives aren't working in the public interest but certainly they do manage to ensure that their political party interests are covered.

I imagine that if the Wildrose Party don't bring in the PCs they might form the next government. If they carry the PCs like humps on their back well I guess it will be slow going to power.
LikeReply3 mins
Laurel Jackson
Sad day, when the only goal of this unified party is to win the next provincial election. Not one policy or idea has come that will actually benefit Albertans.
LikeReply33Jul 5, 2017 5:49pm
Mark Beemer · 

You do realize that the goal of political parties is win the election and form government, very seldom is policy and election platform discussed publicly this far away from an election. And why does policy and platform matter? Trudeau had a platform, and has broken most of his major promises...
LikeReply5Jul 5, 2017 6:11pm
Bill Adams · 

Mark Beemer well the PCs have a long history of wasting Tax payer money so I assume that the policy, you guys going buy some planes to get the Tory airforce going again, Alson needs a ride to SA again
LikeReply8Jul 5, 2017 7:32pm
Blaine Maller · 

Troll
LikeReply15 hrs
Dar Dealmeida
Bill Adams
Allison Redford's corruption is small in comparison to Jason Kenney's federal corruption!
LikeReply512 hrs
Sharon Sullivan-Olsen
If and when they unite we the grassroots voters WILL decide on a policy.
LikeReply9 hrs
Laurel Jackson
Sharon Sullivan-Olsen kind of like the shadow budget we are still waiting to see from the WR? Won't hold my breath.
LikeReply18 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Sharon Sullivan-Olsen I doubt this will happen. You only have to look at the NDP to see that the top dogs decide everything.
LikeReply9 mins
Julie Ali · 

Bill Adams And this waste of public dollars is not limited to the PCs unfortunately . The NDP folks aren't any better at being fiscally prudent. Why else are they borrowing $235 million for a "loan" for big oil to pay for their orphan well program? Not only are we borrowing money for big oil which is sitting on billions of dollars in assets and profits we're also handing over $30 million provided by the federal government to ensure that the industry doesn't pay interest. It's troubling that no matter who we hire they work only in the interests of the elite and corporations. I imagine when we hire the Wildrose this sort of corporate welfare will also continue.
LikeReplyJust now

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