Sunday, July 30, 2017

Julie Ali Flag Julie Ali I would encourage all patients to record all encounters where a health authority and a health ministry is involved. It is good practice to record and avoids problems of the "he said, she said sort" when we have the ability to produce a transcript of the recording indicating the comments of all concerned. In Alberta, there are no patient rights or resident rights in the health care or continuing care system. The lack of rights ensures that the health authority -AHS and the health ministry -Alberta Health can make the bureaucratic and politically expedient decisions that move families forwards in dispute situations. I don't believe that the patient relations offices at AHS or Covenant Health are helpful and really all the advocates we pay for are not able to help us because they have no legislated powers to help us. Since no one is available to help us in problem situations we'd best help ourselves. Recording interactions at meetings with AHS and Alberta Health is reasonable in my opinion. If nothing we document the government and health system maze to show the failures.« less



Not only should you tape record when you have contact with AHS and Covenant Health but you should have an advocate present for all dispute meetings. Don't bother with the health advocates, the mental health advocate, the patient relations folks at hospitals, the disability advocate, the seniors advocate, the PPIC office and the Ombudsman. These folks don't work for us -they work for the GOA.
What you need are real advocates who do the work for the people. We don't have many of them but find them and take them with you to the dispute meetings. And tape.





Recording suggests lack of trust----Sure this is true. But what caused the mistrust in the first place? I would respectfully say that the poor performance of folks in the health care system could result in the taping of any interactions with them once citizens find out about their performance from perusing medical files.
For example, once I found out that the folks from AHS and Covenant Health were meeting to take over the guardianship of my handicapped sister because we did not want her downgraded from long term care to SL4 status--well we were a bit inclined to tape any meetings with the executives of Covenant Health and the representatives of AHS from that point on.
You don't just tape for fun. You tape after experiencing this crap.

Canadian doctors say they're being recorded by their patients — with or without permission. A physician legal body advises doctor to develop a policy surrounding…
CBC.CA

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/doctors-expect-to-be-recorded-by-patients-1.4222727


'OK doc, I'm rolling': Physicians told to expect patients recording them

Doctors have mixed feelings about being recorded on patients' smartphones

By Vik Adhopia, CBC News Posted: Jul 30, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jul 30, 2017 5:00 AM ET
Patients are recording visits with their doctors. The organization that protects doctors against malpractice says physicians have nothing to worry about. But some doctors are uncomfortable with the practice.
Patients are recording visits with their doctors. The organization that protects doctors against malpractice says physicians have nothing to worry about. But some doctors are uncomfortable with the practice. (Andy Hincenbergs/CBC)
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Photo of Vik Adhopia
Vik Adhopia
Vik Adhopia is a senior reporter with the Health Unit at CBC News. He joined CBC National Radio News in Toronto in 1995 and then began his coast-to-coast-to-coast journalistic odyssey, reporting from Iqaluit, Prince George, B.C., Vancouver, St. John's, N.L., and finally back to Toronto again.

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Physicians are being advised by their insurer that patients could record them using smartphones — with or without permission.
The Canadian Medical Protective Association, which among other legal services, insures doctors against malpractice, recommends physicians consider setting recording policies for their clinics.
Dr. Douglas Bell, managing director of the CMPA, said some doctors aren't sure what to say when patients want to record either audio or video of them.
"We're starting to receive more and more calls about recordings by patients," he said.
Under Canadian law, consent isn't required to record another person. But it gets complicated if that material is posted online. For example, YouTube will consider removing a video if a person feels it violates their privacy. But only if the individual in the video is, what the company calls "uniquely identifiable," which may be a matter of opinion.
Also, physicians are obligated to protect the privacy of all their patients, so recording in a waiting room where there are other patients is a problem.

Patient recordings may be helpful

Bell acknowledged most doctors would feel "uncomfortable" being taped by their patients, but suggested it shouldn't be dismissed outright.
"If you have a patient coming in and it's a significant diagnosis, say cancer, basically they're not really hearing anything you say after the 'cancer' word. So if they actually have a recording of your advice, that's actually helpful to the patient," he said.
With the continued demand for smartphone health apps that let us do everything from store prescription info, keep our medical charts, to consult an actual physician, it's no surprise some patients want a smartphone record of a visit with their doctor.
The CMPA suggests if a doctor agrees to be recorded by a patient, that they get a copy of the audio or video for the patient file.
Bell said the liability risk for doctors in Canada is "small," unless they're providing inappropriate advice.
But not all patients bother to ask.

Patient recordings used in U.S. lawsuits

In the U.S., patients who secretly recorded medical staff making disparaging remarks while undergoing surgical procedures have successfully used the audio as evidence in lawsuits.
Dr. Odile Kowalski
Dr. Odile Kowalski, a Laval family physician and obstetrician, does not permit recordings in her clinic. But she says that hasn't stopped at least one of her patients from doing it surreptitiously.
Many doctors say they're not happy at the prospect of being taped.
Dr. Odile Kowalski said she's aware of being recorded surreptitiously at least once.
"I happened to learn about it later from a spouse, so that was not fun."
The Laval, Que., family physician and obstetrician said she's never been asked by a patient to be recorded, and would not permit it. Kowalski said that's because she ensures her patients already have the important information they need before they leave her office.
"We put it down in writing — either the diagnosis or the treatment."
Dr. Vik Bansal, who usually treats elderly patients at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto, said he was bothered when he suspected he'd been recorded without his consent.

Recording suggests lack of trust

"It suggests there's a gap in trust. So you have an environment that's a little bit charged. You're not sure if there's a litigious element to it and that kind of sets a negative tone."
While acknowledging recordings might be useful for patients, Bansal said he'd worry about where that audio or video file could end up. "It can go on a Twitter feed, it can go on YouTube. I have no idea."
Bansal said providing patients with all the information available about their care electronically may preempt the demand for an actual recording of a doctor's visit.
Sunnybrook is among a growing number of Canadian hospitals and clinics that share personal health data and test results in real time with their patients through secure websites or phone apps.



Yusa Watt
  • Yusa Watt
Yes yes .. because we really need to be more like the country to the south of us .
  • 3 hours ago
Julie Ali
  • Julie Ali
@Yusa Watt It is important to have a recording when health authority patient relations folks don't do anything about problems brought up by patients. In Canada, most patients will not sue and yet dispute happen. It's important to have a record of all interactions with the health authority and ministry when disputes occur. At least this my opinion with reference to AHS and Alberta Health. It's just good practice.
  • 7 minutes ago



Julie Ali
  • Julie Ali
I would encourage all patients to record all encounters where a health authority and a health ministry is involved. It is good practice to record and avoids problems of the "he said, she said sort" when we have the ability to produce a transcript of the recording indicating the comments of all concerned.

In Alberta, there are no patient rights or resident rights in the health care or continuing care system. The lack of rights ensures that the health authority -AHS and the health ministry -Alberta Health can make the bureaucratic and politically expedient decisions that move families forwards in dispute situations. I don't believe that the patient relations offices at AHS or Covenant Health are helpful and really all the advocates we pay for are not able to help us because they have no legislated powers to help us.

Since no one is available to help us in problem situations we'd best help ourselves. Recording interactions at meetings with AHS and Alberta Health is reasonable in my opinion. If nothing we document the government and health system maze to show the failures.« less

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