Sunday, July 23, 2017

----Jennifer Neve, Michael's sister, is desperately searching for solutions for her brother. As a nurse at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre herself, she's familiar with the health care system but she's frustrated Michael is still living on a hospital's psychiatric ward.------Jennifer says she came to visit and couldn't believe how thin and unresponsive her brother was. She decided to quit her job in Vancouver and move back to Ottawa to become his guardian. Michael has a security guard 24 hours a day because Jennifer said he has compulsions to hug and touch, something that can make patients and staff uncomfortable. Jennifer said the guards keep Michael out of trouble but sometimes he still gets agitated and requires both physical and chemical restraints. "Which is very traumatizing for Michael. I think if he were to live in a group home, maybe he'd be able to walk in the back yard and blow off some steam as opposed to being cooped up in the hospital." Jennifer says she was told last spring that only about six people in Ottawa will be placed in a home each year and more than a hundred people are on the waiting list.-------Anne Larcade we have to be the change we want to create...lets focus our energy on solutions together we are stronger Love Like Love Haha Wow Sad Angry · Reply · 1 · 4 mins Julie Ali Julie Ali I'm afraid we have to go beyond being the change we want to create Anne to direct political action.Neve, 26, is physically very healthy but he has a developmental disability and autism and no proper home. For the past year and a half he's been living in the psychiatric ward at The Ottawa Hospital while he waits for his name to reach the top of the waiting list for a group home. Ottawa Hospital officials say the cost of an acute-care bed for Michael runs $1,250 a day. Add to that the cost of a 24-hour security guard who keeps an eye on Neve and the price tag for his stay in hospital since 2013 is almost a million dollars and counting.

#HousingNotHospitals--In my opinion there is absolutely no reason for the housing deficit for citizens with disabilities. We are given excuses such as this housing task force business that we are all familiar with in Alberta. Folks in the continuing care system have the same challenges and we've had 44 years of paper generated by government with no action taken.
Why is there no action? I guess because citizens with disabilities have no voice in our society. They are in need of advocates.
In this case, the sister is forced to be the advocate. Jennifer Neve has to speak for Michael. But who speaks for those without advocates? No one.
In our society the least among us have no one speaking for them other than their families.
Very sad but it is what it is.
Incompetence in government.
No political will in the political parties.
And waste of cash by the folks stuck to provide the alternate level of care-hospital folks.

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Anne Larcade
12 hrs
CBC News
ITS CHEAPER and humane to find solutions to supported housing with in home supports. The challenge is to regulate staff, solve the staff shortage of CYW and DSW PSW's and then to have the Ministry help fund families with adult children learn to live in community inclusive in their own homes or apt.
We closed institutions, the Ministry slowed funding group homes to a trickle, so now we have 15,0000- people on wait lists, innovative housing solutions just starting, and many wa...
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The Ottawa Hospital is providing homes to four people with autism who are on wait lists to enter group homes, costing the system millions of dollars.
CBC.CA
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Velvet Martin As well, our elders. This is occurring throughout Canada and will only increase as our population ages. My own mother experienced this as an elder with dementia stuck in hospital for months. 😞
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Julie Ali Government doesn't care about the disabled and the seniors. It's all about control of the public banks to give to the elite. Very sad.
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Anne Larcade we have to be the change we want to create...lets focus our energy on solutions together we are stronger
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Julie Ali I'm afraid we have to go beyond being the change we want to create Anne to direct political action.
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Anne Larcade Julie Ali yes that's why people are suing the government again...
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Julie Ali Anne Larcade Very sad that families have to waste their lives and their money to get government to do the job it is not doing.
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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/ottawa-hospital-spends-millions-to-house-people-with-autism-1.3076247

Ottawa hospital spends millions to house people with autism

Young man with autism has lived in acute-care hospital for 18 months

By Julie Ireton, CBC News Posted: May 19, 2015 5:30 AM ET Last Updated: Feb 12, 2016 2:07 PM ET
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Man with autism lives at Ottawa hospital
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Julie Ireton
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Julie Ireton is a reporter with CBC Ottawa. She’s a critical thinker with interests in business and the people who operate government. Julie is a two-time Michener-Deacon Fellow who has produced hundreds of original pieces of impact journalism. You can reach her at julie.ireton@cbc.ca
Michael Neve loves playing basketball, biking along the Rideau Canal and helping cook dinner for his sister, but such pleasures are impossible when your home is an acute-care hospital.
Neve, 26, is physically very healthy but he has a developmental disability and autism and no proper home.
For the past year and a half he's been living in the psychiatric ward at The Ottawa Hospital while he waits for his name to reach the top of the waiting list for a group home.
Ottawa Hospital officials say the cost of an acute-care bed for Michael runs $1,250 a day. Add to that the cost of a 24-hour security guard who keeps an eye on Neve and the price tag for his stay in hospital since 2013 is almost a million dollars and counting.
Debra Bournes, Vice President of Clinical Programs at the Ottawa Hospital, says Neve is currently one of four people with autism living in the hospital awaiting placement to a home. That also includes someone who has been there for more than 1,000 days.
The total cost to house these four people has added up to millions of dollars.
"The bottom line is these people can wait for years to be able to be discharged into a place where they can have the best quality of life possible," said Bournes.

Searching for solutions

Jennifer Neve, Michael's sister, is desperately searching for solutions for her brother. As a nurse at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre herself, she's familiar with the health care system but she's frustrated Michael is still living on a hospital's psychiatric ward.
Jennifer neve autism hospital bed ottawa
Jennifer Neve hopes a group home sport opens up soon for her brother Michael. (CBC)
"They're set up to have two-week or four-week, short-term stays, seeing acutely ill people," said Jennifer. "I'm very grateful they've taken him in, but at the same time, it's really a band aid solution right?"
Michael Neve attended special education programs up until grade 11. He's physically active and can carry on a limited conversation, but his sister says in the fall of 2013 Michael was living with family friends without proper supervision.
Jennifer was living and working in Vancouver when Michael ended up in the Ottawa Hospital's emergency department in November 2013.
"He was self-harming. That was not good, he needed medical attention," said Jennifer. "When he was in the hospital, he stopped talking, stopped eating, he was wearing diapers, he lost all control of himself. Sort of like a catatonic state."

'Cooped up in the hospital'

Jennifer says she came to visit and couldn't believe how thin and unresponsive her brother was. She decided to quit her job in Vancouver and move back to Ottawa to become his guardian.
Michael has a security guard 24 hours a day because Jennifer said he has compulsions to hug and touch, something that can make patients and staff uncomfortable.
Jennifer said the guards keep Michael out of trouble but sometimes he still gets agitated and requires both physical and chemical restraints.
"Which is very traumatizing for Michael. I think if he were to live in a group home, maybe he'd be able to walk in the back yard and blow off some steam as opposed to being cooped up in the hospital."
Jennifer says she was told last spring that only about six people in Ottawa will be placed in a home each year and more than a hundred people are on the waiting list.
Debra Bournes Vice President of Clinical Programs at the Ottawa Hospital
Debra Bournes, Vice President of Clinical Programs at the Ottawa Hospital, says housing Michael for the past 18 months has cost almost a million dollars. (CBC)
"I almost feel a bit stuck," said Jennifer.
In halting sentences Michael says he'd like to live in his own apartment in downtown Ottawa. Right now he has a personal care worker who takes him to play basketball, art and music classes four afternoons a week.
Michael says he likes the hospital and the friends he's made there, but when asked if there's anything he doesn't like about the hospital, Michael replies, "Not being able to go home."
A spokeswoman for the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services said the ministry recognizes work is needed on residential supports.

"That's why we've created a Housing Task Force to help recommend a broader set of residential options, including those that can be implemented in the short term to address the residential waitlist," read an email statement from Meaghan Coker.
#HousingNotHospitals---Government could solve the problem of housing for the disabled in a millisecond if it really wanted to do this. But instead we have to listen to excuses and baloney for why government can't get off it's butt and do it's job.
These folks have no reason to be stuck in hospital. Publicly funded complex care facilities and housing operations would solve this deficit in every community but no we have to listen to government tell us why we need to research this problem for yet more decades.
This chatter is junk.
Get going government.
Provide the facilities, the care and supports these people need. Not later. Now.

The Ottawa Hospital is providing homes to four people with autism who are on wait lists to enter group homes, costing the system millions of dollars.
CBC.CA

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