Sunday, July 2, 2017

But it isn’t like that at all, despite Notley’s effusive welcome of Horgan, and her vows to co-operate. His vow to block the Kinder Morgan pipeline makes them political enemies.

The BC NDP folks are just like the AB NDP folks and like all politicians-they will do whatever is required to stay in power.
What does this mean in terms of the Kinder Morgan pipeline? Mr. Horgan will do his best to stop it. There might be delays. But eventually it will be built. The delays won't be good for the AB NDP who will be turfed in the next election.
The pipeline isn't the only reason for the problems of the AB NDP.
There are others that are entirely independent of the BC NDP such as:
1) Major debt. We have a problem with the amount of money we are spending and this problem will not go away any time soon. I imagine that the NDP folks will keep on spending until they are laid off in the next election. There is no incentive for them to stop spending since they won't have to deal with the debt in the next election-the next political party we hire will have to deal with it.
2) Failures to deal with the ABCs. The agencies, boards and commissions cost us a lot of money every single year. We cannot sustain the worm burden of the ABCs. This problem was created by the PCs who seemed to have inserted Tory clones everywhere like molecular biologists doing experiments on every sector of our society. This sort of junk should have been immediately addressed by the NDP but they chickened out.
Failure to address the yearly costs of the ABCs by amalgamation and removal of some of these entities is adding to our debt load. In addition public sector and ABC compensation will have to be addressed and salaries need to be reduced. If this results in a loss of talent I guess we will operate with less talent. We can't go on paying CEOs of health authorities like rock stars when there are no deliverables other than spinny releases to the public.
3) Debt of the magnitude we now have is very poor governance in my opinion. While I understand that some of this debt is to compensate for the PCs failure to keep up with infrastructure maintenance and replacement it is still troubling that the GOA was not able to reduce the costs. I have no faith that this debt will be addressed any time soon by either the NDP folks or the political party we hire next because all political parties will do what is required to stay in power even if this means increasing the debt. Frankly I am bewildered how government can borrow money to pay for operating expenses when the inflow of revenue will continue to go down. It's fool hardy. We have the oil and gas industry in transition. Eventually it will go out of business and that source of cash will be lost. But no attempt is being made by government to address this problem of cash inflow. I think this sort of borrowing without any sort of way to pay the debt back is just asking for trouble. Unless of course the Heritage Trust Fund is the collateral for this Ponzi scheme of debt? Very very troubling.
4) To add to the precarious financial position the NDP folks add to our liabilities by giving a $235 million loan to big oil to pay for their liabilities. They use the $30 million given by Team Trudeau folks who were crafty enough not to specify where this money for economic stimulation would go to --for the debt servicing charges of this major "loan". My question is if we are borrowing money to pay for operating expenses of government --why then are we borrowing money to pay for the operating expenses of private business --in terms of their orphan well program? Why are we doing corporate subsidy? And more importantly why are we providing preferential subsidy to the oil and gas industry that is eventually going to go kaput?
Isn't this simply a waste of our cash? Not to mention isn't it a waste of the $30 million from all Canadians to fund an industry that is sitting on billions of dollars of assets and profits? How is it even possible to do this sort of poor decision making when our most vulnerable citizens aren't getting help that they need?
5) Meanwhile the environmental and health effects of oil and gas work are ignored as if these are pesky flies at the picnic of money making in Alberta. How much water is used by the industry that can never be returned to the water cycle? How does fracking for example impact water supplies and quality? What about well water on fire as in the Jessica Ernst case? Who is reviewing the health effects of fracking to determine long term effects? Is any one even bothering to consider the people who live in proximity to the fracking and industry work to see what the problems are? Or is this hush hush research by Alberta Health?
6) The problems in the child welfare system as indicated by the Serenity death are troubling and ongoing. #PanelPolitics won't make them go away. Without a centralized adverse event and follow up registry we are going to continue to see the "learnings" from these cases missed. There is no requirement to implement any learnings, any recommendations from the Child/Youth Advocate or the fatality inquiries. It's a sham and we might as well say it that the system is set up for cover up of liability and problems. It's not going to change because the GOA doesn't want to change.The culture is the problem, the people are protecting turf and their exposed behinds and nothing citizens do will alter the situation. We might as well stop with the show of the roundtables of spin and the panel politics to put this money into more front line staff who are better trained.
7) The continuing care system as illustrated by the mass murder in Ontario is a basket case and won't be attended to by the GOA because why bother? These are folks without a voice in Alberta and we're not interested for the most part unless we have family in the continuing care system. My advice to all families is to be the auditors and remember that retribution in the form of banning, evictions and lawsuits are used to control discourse, public participation and democratic dissent. It's troubling but there you go. The image of continuing care is pretty pretty but the reality is deplorable. I imagine that we will only hear about these problems when the opposition parties bring them up to us since other wise the GOA has the Information and Privacy Act to protect the system and the partners from any sort of accountability.
Seniors and the handicapped are disposable citizens and now that the folks in government do not even appear to understand that the Trespass to Premises legislation is (in my opinion) in contradiction to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms where a charge must be outlined and a person be allowed to defend herself / himself from the charge in court--well then it's just bizarre. The grey area of the use of this imperfect legislation with reference to the continuing care system is even more bizarre. How can a facility ban a person when the citizen renting from this facility has not banned the person? Should you not be able to do the banning yourself rather than the landlord? It's a real mess in terms of the legality of the legislation but no one wants to rock the boat since this legislation is another control mechanism of the system so I guess this imperfect legislation will be used until the cows come home or someone in the Justice Department reviews it to say that -hey--our employees are using a piece of legislation that has holes in it and maybe this isn't a good thing. If the legislation is in conflict with the Charter of Rights and Freedom, then the Trespass to Premises legislation is invalid and the use of it by employees is also invalid.
But of course Alberta Justice is swimming in problems and won't bother to look at the validity of the Trespass to Premises legislation--it will send us back to Alberta Health which simply makes policy and procedure with AHS based on the faulty legislation.
It's just so odd in Alberta.
But there you go.

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Mr. Horgan will do what it takes to stay in power. Which is make politically expedient decisions. If it serves the interests of the BC NDP folks to shut down the pipeline business for a bit until they consolidate power this is what will happen. It might only be a temporary delay but the Alberta NDP are running out of time.
Money is tight.
Debt is high.
And Albertans despite all the infrastructure building aren't happy with the high debt, major number of employees in the public sector costing us big bucks as well as the poor governance with reference to vulnerable citizens as illustrated by the Serenity case. Troubling times for the NDP in Alberta but they will endure until we lay them off in the next provincial election.
I'm predicting a major loss for the NDP in Alberta in the next provincial election--simply because they did not keep their promises.
Mr. Horgan needs to remember this lesson -at least while he is in a precarious minority position. If he messes up the pipeline promise, he will won't last in power.
In fact, all politicians (including Mr. Trudeau) need to remember that citizens remember promises by politicians. Don't make them and break them. We don't forget.
And swing voters like myself aren't loyal to ANY political party. We go to where our interests are best served--just like the political parties.



This should be a happy Canada Day weekend for the Alberta NDP. With the ascension of John Horgan’s New Democrats in B.C., NDP governments will rule both provinces…
CALGARYHERALD.COM

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http://calgaryherald.com/news/politics/braid-for-notleys-ndp-government-theres-little-joy-in-b-c-victory

Braid: For Notley's NDP government, there's little joy in B.C. victory

Published on: June 30, 2017 | Last Updated: June 30, 2017 7:15 PM MDT
John Horgan

NDP leader and Premier-designate John Horgan makes a brief statement and answers questions from the media after meeting with Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon at the Government House in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, June 29, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito ORG XMIT: CAH707
CHAD HIPOLITO,
John Horgan NDP leader and Premier-designate John Horgan makes a brief statement and answers questions from the media after meeting with Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon at the Government House in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, June 29, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito ORG XMIT: CAH707 CHAD HIPOLITO, CHAD HIPOLITO / CP
This should be a happy Canada Day weekend for the Alberta NDP.
With the ascension of John Horgan’s New Democrats in B.C., NDP governments will rule both provinces simultaneously, for the first time ever.
Cross-border power has been a dream of party loyalists for decades, even when there wasn’t the ghost of a chance the NDP could win in Alberta.
Like many other Alberta New Democrats, Premier Rachel Notley once went to work for the cause in B.C. So did her principal secretary, Jim Rutkowski, and her chief of staff, John Heaney.
All three are native Albertans. Rutkowski, Heaney and others returned after Notley’s stunning win. They know Horgan very well and consider him a friend.
They should be out splashing around in the legislature wading pool on Saturday. Shoulder-to-shoulder with natural allies, and all that.
But it isn’t like that at all, despite Notley’s effusive welcome of Horgan, and her vows to co-operate. His vow to block the Kinder Morgan pipeline makes them political enemies.
Alberta Premier Rachel Notley (left), B.C. Premier Christy Clark (right), November 30, 2015 in Le Bourget, France. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld ADRIAN WYLD / CP
Notley is more closely aligned on the pipeline with Christy Clark, the Liberal premier who departs with her reputation in shreds, after parroting NDP and Green policies in a shabby effort to hold office when she failed to win a majority on May 9.
When that didn’t work, Clark asked B.C.’s lieutenant-governor to dissolve the legislature for a new election — exactly what she had publicly vowed not to do. The L-G refused after what was reportedly a testy meeting.
The Liberals are now thoroughly discredited. Some of that will stick to the pipeline project. Clark and her MLAs can’t be counted on to argue for their own agreement in the legislature.
Notley’s people still harbour hope that Horgan will soften his stance once he has access to government documents and realizes that the legal standing of federal approval is rock solid.

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The Alberta New Democrats say obstruction would cause Horgan plenty of problems, prompting lawsuits and widespread civil disorder that most British Columbians won’t want. Polls have shown that more than half the population supports the pipeline.
It’s just possible that Horgan might be amenable to a compromise. As recently as last December, he said: “I find it difficult to see how making Vancouver an export terminal for oil is in the interest of B.C. But I can be persuaded.”
His position hardened as the campaign for the May 9 election approached. He vowed frequently to use every tool at his disposal to block the pipeline.
Now Horgan will be the premier. And Green Leader Andrew Weaver is whispering in his ear. Three Green MLAs hold the balance of power in Horgan’s minority concoction.
B.C. Green party leader Andrew Weaver speaks to media about working with B.C. NDP leader John Horgan after they signed an agreement on creating a stable minority government during a press conference in the Hall of Honour at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Tuesday, May 30, 2017. CHAD HIPOLITO / THE CANADIAN PRESS
Weaver is even more ardently opposed to Kinder Morgan. His record suggests he’ll never agree to shipping large volumes of bitumen off the coast.
The slightest softening of Horgan’s opposition could prompt the Greens to withdraw their support. That would bring down the government. Horgan isn’t likely to risk his premiership for a project that’s been nothing but trouble.
One risk for Notley is that some of her people might go back to B.C. and work for Horgan. Conservatives perk up at the thought. That would be the ultimate propaganda weapon.
It won’t happen, says Notley’s communications boss, Cheryl Oates.
“Honestly, we’re not concerned about staff leaving our majority government to go work in B.C.,” she said.
“The people who work in the Premier’s Office are absolutely dedicated and focused on Alberta’s best interests and that includes making sure Kinder Morgan is built.”
But here’s the ultimate irony. After Notley fought for years to elect the B.C. NDP, her partisan dream has come true. And it might get her defeated.
Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald

dbraid@postmedia.com




Julie Ali · 
Like most politicians Mr. Horgan will do whatever it takes to keep him in power. If this means no pipelines for now I believe he will go this route temporarily.
But as we have seen in Alberta, politicians always do the politically expedient decision making. It's different when you form the government than when you are in opposition.
I don't believe Mr. Horgan will be any different than Ms. Clark. Why do I believe this? Ms. Notley is no different than the former PC premiers and the NDP folks aren't any different than the PCs.
It's basically poor democratic representation everywhere in Canada with the added difficulty of low democratic participation. In a way I can understand citizen apathy. Why bother to take part in democracy when all the political parties are the same and serve themselves? Might as well simply ignore the noise and get on with taking care of your own.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 7:34am
Christian Tatonetti
You'll need more cynism than that to push your toxic diluted tar sand bitumen though my province. Kinder Morgan will never see the light of day. Stop thinking that your cinical spinning will break our resolve to protect our rivers and seas.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 10:43am
Julie Ali · 
Christian Tatonetti You are mistaken. I support BC citizens in their wish to prevent the pollution of land, sea and air. I just doubt that any political party will represent citizens. We've been betrayed in Alberta. Jessica Ernst's ordeal in court is proof of what happens to citizens who try to get accountability from big oil. No way to fight big oil or really any corporation in my opinion. https://thetyee.ca/.../02/Jessica-Ernst-Vagaries-of-Justice/
The regulator largely insisted that the contamination was “natural” or that landowners didn’t know how to maintain their water wells properly.
But that wasn’t the truth. The regulator, largely funded by oil and gas industry (and now chaired by a former energy lobbyist), simply allowed an industry to experiment with a brute force technology with impunity.
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 4:38pm
Greg Droder
Sorry Christian & Julie, the rest of us in the province outside your little lala land on the coast want & need the jobs. The rest of us don't have the luxury to flip million dollar tear downs and be paid to be professional protestors.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 6:16pm
Jeff Roe · 
Pipeline goes down and stop sending Gas and Diesel fuel to BC...Vancouver Airport comes to a virtual standstill...BC Ferries grinds to a halt, oh gee and everyone has to walk cause theirs no Gasoline...oops...If BC Thinks they dont need KM then watch southern BC come to a grinding halt with oil shortages throughout the lower mainland and vancouver island. Just because they have a minor issue with existing infrasturcture thats going to help curb the demand Southern BC has for Alberta Oil..
J.E. Molnar
I’m not getting my knickers in a knot just yet over supposition by scribes like Braid and others who tend to promote a more dystopian political view to enhance “click bait” journalism.

Myriad social democratic reforms promised during the election by the Greens and NDP means that additional funding will be required to support those initiatives. I doubt BCers have an appetite for new taxes. It’s more likely that this new coalition government will eventually succumb and support the construction of a pipeline which will ensure added government revenue to support daycare, education and healthcare — funds that will likely accrue in the millions of dollars annually.
Aaron Morton · 
"J.E. Molnar", it's satisfying to see the panic set in with the Alberta NDP. Their (your) social license meme has been revealed for what it truly is, complete and utter nonsense.
UnlikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 5:05pm
J.E. Molnar
Aaron Morton still trolling and cyberbullying I see. Whatever floats your boat. Always a pleasure to get under your skin.
LikeReplyJul 1, 2017 6:44pm
Julie Ali · 
Aaron Morton I have to admit that the NDP talk big about social license but are now revealed to be identical to the PCs in their one sided support of the oil and gas industry. This was the political party that was against fracking BEFORE they got to power. Once in power there is nothing from them about the problems of water contamination as in Rosebud, Alberta. Also no information on the massive use of water in fracking that cannot be returned to the water cycle. Instead of providing us with the information we want regard water contamination through the comparison with baseline water testing, we have no information. Also I guess the $235 million "loan" for big oil's liabilities was done out of the bigness of their hearts and not because of a sellout to the industry which is supposed to pay for this work without public support. Why couldn't big oil have got it's own loan to do this work? It has billions in assets and profits. But no, the NDP abdicate the public interest like the PCs.
LikeReply23 hrs
Bill Webb
Turn off the pipeline. Vancouver airport shuts down. Asians stay home. Real estate plummets. Everyone lives on pot and salmon. Bc people will be happy won't they?
LikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 8:13am
Christian Tatonetti
Pot and salmon? I don't smoke weed but I would start right away if it could help stop your pipelines and protect my seashores. Anytime!
UnlikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 9:00pm
Lorne Harvey · 
Christian Tatonetti our a nasty leap radical. victoria every day raw sewage in the ocean. hastings street. clear cutting. highway of tears.
LikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 9:15pm
Bill Webb
Christian Tatonetti lol. It's your pipline for your planes and autos and heat. And computer plastic clothes etc. Maybe talk to Victoria about their raw sewage in the ocean instead of fussing about the one thing that has given YOU the life you have.....fossil fuels.
LikeReply2Jul 2, 2017 8:22amEdited
Julie Ali · 
Bill Webb While I agree we need oil there needs to be better surveillance of aging pipeline infrastructure.

The number of spills in Alberta are significant and when there is contamination of waterways this is a concern. These spills are listed on the AER website. Two recent spills are noted here:
http://www.cbc.ca/.../pipeline-spill-crude-oil-strathcona...
Four energy companies are cleaning up crude oil that spilled into an unnamed creek in Strathcona County on Friday.
The creek, near 17th Street and Baseline Road, flows directly into the North Saskatchewan River.
**************
http://calgaryherald.com/.../crude-oil-spills-in-central...
“The second was larger, and entered a waterbody,” she said, describing it as a small, unnamed creek. “That water body unfortunately was home to some fish and other wildlife.”
***...See More
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 7:23am
Julie Ali · 
Christian Tatonetti
There are problems associated with pipelines and the oil and gas industry in Alberta.

We only have to look at Jessica Ernst's well water on fire in Rosebud, Alberta to see one major problem with reference to fracking which is possible contamination of water supplies.
http://www.ernstversusencana.ca/
On April 27, 2011 lawyers representing Jessica Ernst, a 54-year-old oil patch consultant, released a 73-page statement of claim that alleges that EnCana broke multiple provincial laws and regulations and contaminated a shallow aquifer used by a rural community with natural gas and toxic industry-related chemicals.

The claim methodically reports how Alberta’s two key groundwater regulators, Alberta Environment and the ERCB, “failed to follow the investigation and enforcement processes that they had established and publicized.
*****************
The AER is in my opinion, the front office of big oil and does not help citizens faced with pollution problems of this nature.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 7:28amEdited
Bill Webb
Julie Ali. Oil can be cleaned up. Are you as concerned about the bird and bat slaughter every day..every week..every month...every year by windmills. Which by the way have a massive carbon footprint to mine manufacture and install. Check out the huge cement pad under one of those things. And all for a small amount of power often produced at night when it's not needed.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 8:21am
Christian Tatonetti
Bill Webb you are such a shill for the oil industry. If you are so proud of Alberta's bitumen sands and like jobs so much, then, figure out how to process your toxic dilgoop in Alberta instead of promoting the idea of shipping it raw to China for someone else to do it. Maybe a spill in the ocea is not a big deal for you because Alberta, Kinder Morgan and all involved would not even be on the hook for the damages. But I am here right in the path of the proposed tanker route for your toxic dilbit super tanker and I have every right to saw NO. NO as in NEVER. You do not have the right to threaten my territory. You do not have the right to destroy my economy, my health, even if British Columbia and the Salish Sea was not Un-ceded territory. Back off and tone down the "You owe your lifestyle to Alberta" bull crap. I owe you nothing
UnlikeReply2Jul 2, 2017 10:39am
Bill Webb
Christian Tatonetti. Lol it's not me it's you. Your airplane fuel for Vancouver airport. Your plastic computer your synthetic clothes your furniture your car are using oil. Don't look at me. I would love to process it here and sell it to you for more money as you use so much.

You also ignored the science I talked about with windmills......

By the way the elk moose deer and bison on our rehabilitated oil sands sites say hi to you in the concrete toxic jungle you live in
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 1:34pmEdited
Julie Ali · 
Bill Webb Really? Oil can be cleaned up? At what cost? If we look at the mess at Kalamazoo, costs of clean up were prohibitive.
https://www.epa.gov/.../us-enbridge-reach-177-million... U.S., Enbridge Reach $177 Million Settlement after 2010 Oil Spills in Michigan and Illinois In addition to payments required under the proposed settlement, Enbridge has already reimbursed the government for $57.8 million in cleanup costs from the Marshall spill and $650,000 for cleanup costs from the Romeoville spill, and Enbridge reportedly incurred costs in excess of $1 billion for required cleanup activities relating to the Marshall and Romeoville spills.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 4:42pm
Julie Ali · 
Bill Webb I don't know of the losses in wildlife due to windmills. I'm talking about the problems with the oil and gas industry in Alberta. Most Albertans mysteriously do not seem to find these problems troubling. Most Albertans know nothing of well water on fire in Rosebud, Alberta where Jessica Ernst has been doing the work of the GOA in the public interest. Why is a private citizen doing the work of Alberta Environment? Why don't we have government protecting the environment? The mandate of the energy regulator appears to be to protect the interests of big oil. Certainly the AER cannot be held accountable since the PCs provided an immunity clause to ensure it is free from lawsuits. It's troubling that the GOA with both the PCs and the NDP folks is captive to big oil. The environmental issues, the pollution of landowner properties, the residues of big oil in the orphan wells, the unremediated tailings ponds, the major use of water represent problems that the GOA has not addressed.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 4:51pmEdited
Jeff Roe · 
How many of us want to see more Rail oil tankers between Alberta and BC...much more risky than a pipeline...But will be reality if KM not expanded..actually u will probably see them double ...Now thats an enviromental disaster waiting to Happen
LikeReplyJul 3, 2017 1:38pm
Julie Ali · 
Jeff Roe How many trains derail versus how many oil spills occurring from aging pipeline infrastructure? If you look at the AER Compliance Dashboard it appears that the frequency of spills from pipelines exceed those from train disasters. http://www1.aer.ca/compliancedashboard/incidents.html
The AER’s incident reporting provides Albertans with information about energy incidents in the province. The information published here is based on incident information reported to the AER.
LikeReplyJul 3, 2017 4:35pm
Julie Ali · 
Christian Tatonetti It is unfortunate that some Albertans have stereotypes of folks. I think the folks from BC are being responsible about the matter of pipelines. I think they understand that land,air and water are priceless and while we do need oil we also need to ensure that we protect the environment. Bravo to the folks in BC who care!
LikeReplyJul 3, 2017 4:38pm
Julie Ali · 
Lorne Harvey Really what has this list got to do with his opposition to the pipelines? It's just making diversions.
LikeReply23 hrs
John Robertson · 
The Liberals are in disarray in BC and I'm pretty sure the NDP will find a way to have an election within 6 to 9 months time. If they do then they will have a good chance to win a majority government and kiss the Greens goodbye. If this happens then you will see all the NDPers that the NDP here imported from BC pack up and go home to fight against Alberta, they have no loyalty to Alberta.
LikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 7:22am
Julie Ali · 
This sounds like a possibility. Mr. Horgan might keep his promises so that re-election is possible. In Alberta, despite all the enthusiasm by some, I doubt that the NDP will win again. It's hard to vote for a party that fails our families.
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 7:16am

Geoffrey A Pounder
"Notley’s people still harbour hope that Horgan will soften his stance once he has access to government documents and realizes that the legal standing of federal approval is rock solid."

Rock solid?
Three First Nations have filed court actions challenging the pipeline's approval — actions backed by the new NDP Govt.
Kinder Morgan faces 19 separate lawsuits.
The Federal Court will undertake a judicial review this fall.

The National Energy Board review came under heavy criticism: It "restricted public participation, ignored impacts on marine mammals and ecosystems, excluded cross-examination of witnesses and failed to assess potential upstream emissions."
thetyee [dot] ca/News/2017/05/26/Stop-Kinder-Morgan-Pipeline/
LikeReply1Jun 30, 2017 8:50pm
Geoffrey A Pounder
"Polls have shown that more than half the population supports the pipeline."

The election is the only poll that counts.
56% of the popular vote went to the two anti-pipeline parties compared to 41% for Christy Clark's Liberals. The BC Liberals lost key seats and several ministers around the pipeline terminus in metro Vancouver. The NDP won all four ridings in Burnaby.
BC voters sent Kinder Morgan a clear message.
LikeReply3Jun 30, 2017 8:56pmEdited
Steve Simonds · 
"actions backed by the new NDP Govt." So what, as the article says there is no legal way for Horgan to block the pipeline.
LikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 1:51am
Steve Simonds · 
Geoffrey A Pounder Not quite that simple. Horgan vowed to cancel the bridge tolls which got a lot of votes in that area.
LikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 1:54amEdited
Steven Marinoske
Geoffrey A Pounder "BC voters sent Kinder Morgan a clear message". That's totally incredible that the NDP and Greens got elected on that single issue - I didn't realize that's how elections in BC worked? Maybe in your household that works, but I would think other parts of the population look at party platforms as a whole. A reminder too the most vehiment anti-pipeline party there (Greens) got < 1/4 of the overall vote. And, oh yeah, speaking from a province with a little experience on this, sometimes a population simply votes for change even rather than policies, then wakes up the next morning with the worst hangover and wonders "what the hell did we do?" (think US and Phillipines here too). This was more anti-Clark Liberal vote than pro-anything otherwise.
LikeReply4Jul 1, 2017 6:53am
Bill Webb
Geoffrey A Pounder those nasty pipelines supply av feul to yvr. Lets shut it down.
LikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 8:15am
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Julie Ali · 

Like most politicians Mr. Horgan will do whatever it takes to keep him in power. If this means no pipelines for now I believe he will go this route temporarily.
But as we have seen in Alberta, politicians always do the politically expedient decision making. It's different when you form the government than when you are in opposition.
I don't believe Mr. Horgan will be any different than Ms. Clark. Why do I believe this? Ms. Notley is no different than the former PC premiers and the NDP folks aren't any different than the PCs.
It's basically poor democratic representation everywhere in Canada with the added difficulty of low democratic participation. In a way I can understand citizen apathy. Why bother to take part in democracy when all the political parties are the same and serve themselves? Might as well simply ignore the noise and get on with taking care of your own.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 7:34am
Christian Tatonetti
You'll need more cynism than that to push your toxic diluted tar sand bitumen though my province. Kinder Morgan will never see the light of day. Stop thinking that your cinical spinning will break our resolve to protect our rivers and seas.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 10:43am
Julie Ali · 

Christian Tatonetti You are mistaken. I support BC citizens in their wish to prevent the pollution of land, sea and air. I just doubt that any political party will represent citizens. We've been betrayed in Alberta. Jessica Ernst's ordeal in court is proof of what happens to citizens who try to get accountability from big oil. No way to fight big oil or really any corporation in my opinion. https://thetyee.ca/.../02/Jessica-Ernst-Vagaries-of-Justice/
The regulator largely insisted that the contamination was “natural” or that landowners didn’t know how to maintain their water wells properly.
But that wasn’t the truth. The regulator, largely funded by oil and gas industry (and now chaired by a former energy lobbyist), simply allowed an industry to experiment with a brute force technology with impunity.
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 4:38pm
Greg Droder
Sorry Christian & Julie, the rest of us in the province outside your little lala land on the coast want & need the jobs. The rest of us don't have the luxury to flip million dollar tear downs and be paid to be professional protestors.
LikeReply22 hrs
Jeff Roe · 

Pipeline goes down and stop sending Gas and Diesel fuel to BC...Vancouver Airport comes to a virtual standstill...BC Ferries grinds to a halt, oh gee and everyone has to walk cause theirs no Gasoline...oops...If BC Thinks they dont need KM then watch southern BC come to a grinding halt with oil shortages throughout the lower mainland and vancouver island. Just because they have a minor issue with existing infrasturcture thats going to help curb the demand Southern BC has for Alberta Oil..
LikeReply3 hrs
J.E. Molnar
I’m not getting my knickers in a knot just yet over supposition by scribes like Braid and others who tend to promote a more dystopian political view to enhance “click bait” journalism.

Myriad social democratic reforms promised during the election by the Greens and NDP means that additional funding will be required to support those initiatives. I doubt BCers have an appetite for new taxes. It’s more likely that this new coalition government will eventually succumb and support the construction of a pipeline which will ensure added government revenue to support daycare, education and healthcare — funds that will likely accrue in the millions of dollars annually.
Aaron Morton · 

"J.E. Molnar", it's satisfying to see the panic set in with the Alberta NDP. Their (your) social license meme has been revealed for what it truly is, complete and utter nonsense.
UnlikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 5:05pm
J.E. Molnar
Aaron Morton still trolling and cyberbullying I see. Whatever floats your boat. Always a pleasure to get under your skin.
LikeReplyJul 1, 2017 6:44pm
Julie Ali · 

Aaron Morton I have to admit that the NDP talk big about social license but are now revealed to be identical to the PCs in their one sided support of the oil and gas industry. This was the political party that was against fracking BEFORE they got to power. Once in power there is nothing from them about the problems of water contamination as in Rosebud, Alberta. Also no information on the massive use of water in fracking that cannot be returned to the water cycle. Instead of providing us with the information we want regard water contamination through the comparison with baseline water testing, we have no information. Also I guess the $235 million "loan" for big oil's liabilities was done out of the bigness of their hearts and not because of a sellout to the industry which is supposed to pay for this work without public support. Why couldn't big oil have got it's own loan to do this work? It has billions in assets and profits. But no, the NDP abdicate the public interest like the PCs.
LikeReplyJust now
Bill Webb
Turn off the pipeline. Vancouver airport shuts down. Asians stay home. Real estate plummets. Everyone lives on pot and salmon. Bc people will be happy won't they?
LikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 8:13am
Christian Tatonetti
Pot and salmon? I don't smoke weed but I would start right away if it could help stop your pipelines and protect my seashores. Anytime!
UnlikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 9:00pm
Lorne Harvey · 

Christian Tatonetti our a nasty leap radical. victoria every day raw sewage in the ocean. hastings street. clear cutting. highway of tears.
LikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 9:15pm
Bill Webb
Christian Tatonetti lol. It's your pipline for your planes and autos and heat. And computer plastic clothes etc. Maybe talk to Victoria about their raw sewage in the ocean instead of fussing about the one thing that has given YOU the life you have.....fossil fuels.
LikeReply2Jul 2, 2017 8:22amEdited
Julie Ali · 

Bill Webb While I agree we need oil there needs to be better surveillance of aging pipeline infrastructure.

The number of spills in Alberta are significant and when there is contamination of waterways this is a concern. These spills are listed on the AER website. Two recent spills are noted here:
http://www.cbc.ca/.../pipeline-spill-crude-oil-strathcona...
Four energy companies are cleaning up crude oil that spilled into an unnamed creek in Strathcona County on Friday.
The creek, near 17th Street and Baseline Road, flows directly into the North Saskatchewan River.
**************
http://calgaryherald.com/.../crude-oil-spills-in-central...
“The second was larger, and entered a waterbody,” she said, describing it as a small, unnamed creek. “That water body unfortunately was home to some fish and other wildlife.”
***
Water is more important than oil. BC is correct to be concerned.
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 7:23am
Julie Ali · 

Christian Tatonetti
There are problems associated with pipelines and the oil and gas industry in Alberta.

We only have to look at Jessica Ernst's well water on fire in Rosebud, Alberta to see one major problem with reference to fracking which is possible contamination of water supplies.
http://www.ernstversusencana.ca/
On April 27, 2011 lawyers representing Jessica Ernst, a 54-year-old oil patch consultant, released a 73-page statement of claim that alleges that EnCana broke multiple provincial laws and regulations and contaminated a shallow aquifer used by a rural community with natural gas and toxic industry-related chemicals.

The claim methodically reports how Alberta’s two key groundwater regulators, Alberta Environment and the ERCB, “failed to follow the investigation and enforcement processes that they had established and publicized.
*****************
The AER is in my opinion, the front office of big oil and does not help citizens faced with pollution problems of this nature.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 7:28amEdited
Bill Webb
Julie Ali. Oil can be cleaned up. Are you as concerned about the bird and bat slaughter every day..every week..every month...every year by windmills. Which by the way have a massive carbon footprint to mine manufacture and install. Check out the huge cement pad under one of those things. And all for a small amount of power often produced at night when it's not needed.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 8:21am
Christian Tatonetti
Bill Webb you are such a shill for the oil industry. If you are so proud of Alberta's bitumen sands and like jobs so much, then, figure out how to process your toxic dilgoop in Alberta instead of promoting the idea of shipping it raw to China for someone else to do it. Maybe a spill in the ocea is not a big deal for you because Alberta, Kinder Morgan and all involved would not even be on the hook for the damages. But I am here right in the path of the proposed tanker route for your toxic dilbit super tanker and I have every right to saw NO. NO as in NEVER. You do not have the right to threaten my territory. You do not have the right to destroy my economy, my health, even if British Columbia and the Salish Sea was not Un-ceded territory. Back off and tone down the "You owe your lifestyle to Alberta" bull crap. I owe you nothing
UnlikeReply2Jul 2, 2017 10:39am
Bill Webb
Christian Tatonetti. Lol it's not me it's you. Your airplane fuel for Vancouver airport. Your plastic computer your synthetic clothes your furniture your car are using oil. Don't look at me. I would love to process it here and sell it to you for more money as you use so much.

You also ignored the science I talked about with windmills......

By the way the elk moose deer and bison on our rehabilitated oil sands sites say hi to you in the concrete toxic jungle you live in
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 1:34pmEdited
Julie Ali · 

Bill Webb Really? Oil can be cleaned up? At what cost? If we look at the mess at Kalamazoo, costs of clean up were prohibitive.
https://www.epa.gov/.../us-enbridge-reach-177-million... U.S., Enbridge Reach $177 Million Settlement after 2010 Oil Spills in Michigan and Illinois In addition to payments required under the proposed settlement, Enbridge has already reimbursed the government for $57.8 million in cleanup costs from the Marshall spill and $650,000 for cleanup costs from the Romeoville spill, and Enbridge reportedly incurred costs in excess of $1 billion for required cleanup activities relating to the Marshall and Romeoville spills.
LikeReply1Jul 2, 2017 4:42pm
Julie Ali · 

Bill Webb I don't know of the losses in wildlife due to windmills. I'm talking about the problems with the oil and gas industry in Alberta. Most Albertans mysteriously do not seem to find these problems troubling. Most Albertans know nothing of well water on fire in Rosebud, Alberta where Jessica Ernst has been doing the work of the GOA in the public interest. Why is a private citizen doing the work of Alberta Environment? Why don't we have government protecting the environment? The mandate of the energy regulator appears to be to protect the interests of big oil. Certainly the AER cannot be held accountable since the PCs provided an immunity clause to ensure it is free from lawsuits. It's troubling that the GOA with both the PCs and the NDP folks is captive to big oil. The environmental issues, the pollution of landowner properties, the residues of big oil in the orphan wells, the unremediated tailings ponds, the major use of water represent problems that the GOA has not addressed.
LikeReply123 hrsEdited
Jeff Roe · 

How many of us want to see more Rail oil tankers between Alberta and BC...much more risky than a pipeline...But will be reality if KM not expanded..actually u will probably see them double ...Now thats an enviromental disaster waiting to Happen
LikeReply3 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Jeff Roe How many trains derail versus how many oil spills occurring from aging pipeline infrastructure? If you look at the AER Compliance Dashboard it appears that the frequency of spills from pipelines exceed those from train disasters. http://www1.aer.ca/compliancedashboard/incidents.html
The AER’s incident reporting provides Albertans with information about energy incidents in the province. The information published here is based on incident information reported to the AER.
LikeReply8 mins
Julie Ali · 

Christian Tatonetti It is unfortunate that some Albertans have stereotypes of folks. I think the folks from BC are being responsible about the matter of pipelines. I think they understand that land,air and water are priceless and while we do need oil we also need to ensure that we protect the environment. Bravo to the folks in BC who care!
LikeReply5 mins
Julie Ali · 

Lorne Harvey Really what has this list got to do with his opposition to the pipelines? It's just making diversions.
LikeReply4 mins
John Robertson · 

The Liberals are in disarray in BC and I'm pretty sure the NDP will find a way to have an election within 6 to 9 months time. If they do then they will have a good chance to win a majority government and kiss the Greens goodbye. If this happens then you will see all the NDPers that the NDP here imported from BC pack up and go home to fight against Alberta, they have no loyalty to Alberta.
LikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 7:22am
Julie Ali · 

This sounds like a possibility. Mr. Horgan might keep his promises so that re-election is possible. In Alberta, despite all the enthusiasm by some, I doubt that the NDP will win again. It's hard to vote for a party that fails our families.
LikeReplyJul 2, 2017 7:16am
Geoffrey A Pounder
"Notley’s people still harbour hope that Horgan will soften his stance once he has access to government documents and realizes that the legal standing of federal approval is rock solid."

Rock solid?
Three First Nations have filed court actions challenging the pipeline's approval — actions backed by the new NDP Govt.
Kinder Morgan faces 19 separate lawsuits.
The Federal Court will undertake a judicial review this fall.

The National Energy Board review came under heavy criticism: It "restricted public participation, ignored impacts on marine mammals and ecosystems, excluded cross-examination of witnesses and failed to assess potential upstream emissions."
thetyee [dot] ca/News/2017/05/26/Stop-Kinder-Morgan-Pipeline/
LikeReply1Jun 30, 2017 8:50pm
Geoffrey A Pounder
"Polls have shown that more than half the population supports the pipeline."

The election is the only poll that counts.
56% of the popular vote went to the two anti-pipeline parties compared to 41% for Christy Clark's Liberals. The BC Liberals lost key seats and several ministers around the pipeline terminus in metro Vancouver. The NDP won all four ridings in Burnaby.
BC voters sent Kinder Morgan a clear message.
LikeReply3Jun 30, 2017 8:56pmEdited
Steve Simonds · 

"actions backed by the new NDP Govt." So what, as the article says there is no legal way for Horgan to block the pipeline.
LikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 1:51am
Steve Simonds · 

Geoffrey A Pounder Not quite that simple. Horgan vowed to cancel the bridge tolls which got a lot of votes in that area.
LikeReply5Jul 1, 2017 1:54amEdited
Steven Marinoske
Geoffrey A Pounder "BC voters sent Kinder Morgan a clear message". That's totally incredible that the NDP and Greens got elected on that single issue - I didn't realize that's how elections in BC worked? Maybe in your household that works, but I would think other parts of the population look at party platforms as a whole. A reminder too the most vehiment anti-pipeline party there (Greens) got < 1/4 of the overall vote. And, oh yeah, speaking from a province with a little experience on this, sometimes a population simply votes for change even rather than policies, then wakes up the next morning with the worst hangover and wonders "what the hell did we do?" (think US and Phillipines here too). This was more anti-Clark Liberal vote than pro-anything otherwise.
LikeReply4Jul 1, 2017 6:53am
Bill Webb
Geoffrey A Pounder those nasty pipelines supply av feul to yvr. Lets shut it down.
LikeReply3Jul 1, 2017 8:15am



Water is more important than oil but I guess we won't realize this until the water ways are so polluted that we can't use them.


Cleanup of a crude oil spill in Strathcona County on Friday continued into Sunday, with crews from four energy companies pitching in. The size, source and cause of the spill has not been released.
CBC.CA

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/pipeline-spill-crude-oil-strathcona-county-cleanup-creek-1.4082296




Pipeline break spills crude oil into Strathcona County creek

Spill contained before it could flow into North Saskatchewan River, Alberta Energy Regulator confirms

By Zoe Todd, CBC News Posted: Apr 23, 2017 7:23 PM MT Last Updated: Apr 25, 2017 9:26 AM MT
Crude oil spilled into an unnamed creek in Strathcona County on Saturday, near an industrial area around 17th Street and Baseline Road.
Crude oil spilled into an unnamed creek in Strathcona County on Saturday, near an industrial area around 17th Street and Baseline Road. (Google Maps)
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Four energy companies are cleaning up crude oil that spilled into an unnamed creek in Strathcona County on Friday.
The creek, near 17th Street and Baseline Road, flows directly into the North Saskatchewan River.
Crews managed to contain the spill before it reached the river, Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) spokesperson Monica Hermary said Sunday. The size of the spill is still unclear.
"We will work with the companies to assess the cause of the incident," Hermary said. "Right now our focus is on ensuring that all safety and environmental requirements are met in response to the incident."
A team of Imperial Oil workers discovered the leak during routine maintenance.
Oil spilled along a pipeline right-of-way near the boundary between Strathcona County and Sherwood Park, a strip of industrial land where a number of companies have built pipelines.
Four companies could be responsible for the spill, Hermary said. She identified Imperial Oil, Gibson Energy, Inter Pipeline and Pembina Pipeline.
All four companies have shut in and de-pressurized their pipelines in the affected area and are helping with the cleanup.
Belinda de Wolde, a spokesperson for Imperial Oil, said the crude oil did not match her company's products when tested. Imperial Oil is leading the response to the incident.
"The current process, in addition to obviously recovering the oil, is determining where the source of the crude is," she added. "In other words, who the responsible party is. Then we would transition the recovery efforts to that company."
Crews discovered and contained the crude oil early, which de Wolde said has simplified the cleanup process.
"It's not a complicated site so it is moving quite quickly," she said.
Workers are using absorbent pads to soak up the spill. But on Sunday, de Wolde said it was still too early to estimate when crews would finish soaking up the spill.
"This is an operation that happens around the clock," she said. "No idea of how much longer it will take. We will carry on until the responsible party is identified."
The AER is overseeing the response to the incident. It is working with the companies, Alberta Environment and Parks and Environment Canada to ensure all safety and environmental requirements are met.
The number of oil spills in Alberta may be related to aging infrastructure. What is the AER doing proactively to address the cause of these spills rather than the post spill response?
Would prevention not be better than clean up?
Why aren't we seeing any information about pipeline replacement?
What about the maintenance records?
Who is in charge of ensuring public safety with reference to these spills?


Cleanup efforts are underway after two separate pipeline leaks in central Alberta. The Alberta Energy Regulator said it learned Wednesday of crude oil emulsion leaking…
CALGARYHERALD.COM

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http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/crude-oil-spills-in-central-alberta-from-calgary-based-journey-energy



Crude oil spills in central Alberta linked to Calgary-based Journey Energy

Published on: June 30, 2017 | Last Updated: June 30, 2017 9:00 PM MDT
AER (Alberta Energy Regulator) flag.
AER (Alberta Energy Regulator) flag.
Cleanup efforts are underway after two separate pipeline leaks in central Alberta.
The Alberta Energy Regulator said it learned Wednesday of crude oil emulsion leaking from a pipeline owned by Calgary-based Journey Energy just south of Winfield, a hamlet about 80 kilometres southwest of Edmonton.
On Thursday, company crews attending the scene discovered oil flowing from a second leak nearby, said AER spokesperson Cassie Naas.
“The second was larger, and entered a waterbody,” she said, describing it as a small, unnamed creek. “That water body unfortunately was home to some fish and other wildlife.”
Both spills came from the same pipeline, she said.
An enforcement order was immediately issued against Journey, requiring the firm to suspend operations, contain the release and prevent it from spreading. The company must also develop plans to remediate the affected lands and wildlife, and provide daily reports to the AER.
While the full magnitude of the spill isn’t yet known, Naas said about a cubic metre was released in the first incident. That leak posed no environmental threat, she said.
The cause of the spill remains under investigation by the AER.
In April, a spill from a Journey-owned pipeline in the same area released about five cubic metres of crude oil.
bpassifiume@postmedia.com
On Twitter: @bryanpassifiume

http://www.ernstversusencana.ca/


Multi-Million Dollar Landmark North American Lawsuit on Hydraulic Fracturing and Its Impact on Groundwater

Suit accuses EnCana, Alberta Environment and Energy Resources Conservation Board of negligence and unlawful activities. Case presented at the United Nations in New York.
April 27, 2011
Jessica Ernst by Colin Smith
Jessica Ernst on her land, photograph by Colin Smith
Nearly a decade ago EnCana, one of the world’s largest natural gas producers, began a risky and experimental drilling program that required intense hydraulic fracturing for shallow coalbed methane (Horseshoe Canyon Formation) throughout central Alberta.
Hydraulic fracturing blasts open oil, gas and coal formations with highly pressurized volumes of water, sand and undisclosed chemical fluids or gases. The technology has boosted natural gas reserves but has become the subject of serious government investigations throughout North America due to surface and groundwater contamination.
In Report 2011-A Alberta’s primary energy regulator, the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB), recently disclosed that the potential for hydraulic fracturing to contaminate useable water aquifers with fracturing fluid chemicals and natural gas is a real public issue, especially in shallow zones.
On April 27, 2011 lawyers representing Jessica Ernst, a 54-year-old oil patch consultant, released a 73-page statement of claim that alleges that EnCana broke multiple provincial laws and regulations and contaminated a shallow aquifer used by a rural community with natural gas and toxic industry-related chemicals.
The claim methodically reports how Alberta’s two key groundwater regulators, Alberta Environment and the ERCB, “failed to follow the investigation and enforcement processes that they had established and publicized.”
The ERCB recently gave EnCana permission to drill and fracture more CBM wells above the base of groundwater protection near the affected water wells mentioned in this claim.
Jessica Ernst has been invited to present her story and make recommendations to governments at the 19th session of the Commission on Sustainable Development at the United Nations in New York.
The claim represents assertions that have not yet been proven in court.  All defendants will have the opportunity to respond in these proceedings.
____________________________________________________________________

Un procès historique Nord Américain de plusieurs millions de dollars à propos de la fracturation hydraulique et ses impacts sur la nappe phréatique

Le procès accuse EnCana, Alberta Environment et Energy Resources Conservation Board de négligence et d’activités illégales. La cause présentée devant les Nations Unies à New York.
Jessica Ernst by Colin Smith
Jessica Ernst chez elle, photo de Colin Smith
Il y a de cela presque une décennie, EnCana, l’une des plus importantes gazières du monde, a commencé un programme de forage risqué et expérimental nécessitant de la fracturation hydraulique intense afin d’extraire du méthane, en gaz de couche peu profonde dans la formation Horseshoe Canyon au cœur de l’Alberta.
La fracturation hydraulique provoque des failles dans les formations géologiques contenant du pétrole, du gaz et du charbon grâce à de grandes quantités d’eau injectées à haute pression avec du sable et des mélanges de fluides ou de gaz chimiques non divulgués. La technique permet d’exploiter des réserves de gaz naturel jusque-là inaccessibles, mais est l’objet d’enquêtes gouvernementales sérieuses à travers l’Amérique du Nord à cause de contaminations d’eaux de surface et souterraines.
Dans son rapport 2011-A, le principal organisme de contrôle de l’Alberta, l’Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB), a révélé que le potentiel des chimiques des fluides de fracturation et le gaz naturel de contaminer les aquifères d’eau potable est une véritable question d’intérêt public, surtout dans les régions peu profondes.
Le 27 avril 2011, les avocats de Jessica Ernst vont déposer une réclamation de 73 pages qui prétend qu’EnCana a enfreint à plusieurs lois et règlements provinciaux ainsi qu’avoir contaminé un aquifère peu profond desservant une communauté rurale avec du gaz naturel et des chimiques toxiques utilisés par l’industrie.
La réclamation détaille méthodiquement comment les deux principaux organismes de contrôle de l’eau souterraine de l’Alberta, Alberta Environment et le ERCB, ont “manqué dans leur tâche de suivre les procédés d’enquête et de mise en application qu’ils s’étaient fixé et avaient rendus public.”
Le ERCB avait donné dernièrement la permission à EnCana de forer et fracturer davantage de puits au-delà de la protection minimale de l’eau souterraine près des puits d’eau potable mentionnés dans cette réclamation.
Jessica Ernst a été invitée à présenter son histoire et faire ses recommandations aux gouvernements à la 19e session de la Commission de développement durable aux Nations Unis à New York.
La réclamation fait des déclarations qui n’ont pas été prouvées en cour de justice. Tous les défendeurs auront la possibilité d’y répondre durant ces procédures.

____________________________________________________

UNANIMA International Woman of Courage Award

NEW YORK, New York (October 1, 2011) UNANIMA International, a UN Economic and Social Council accredited NGO working for international justice at the United Nations celebrates its 10th Anniversary Saturday by presenting its annual WOMAN OF COURAGE award to Jessica Ernst of Rosebud, Alberta, internationally known for her efforts to hold companies accountable for environmental harm done by “fracking”.
Ernst, a 54 year old scientist with 30 years petroleum industry experience, is suing the Alberta government, Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) and EnCana for negligence and unlawful activities.
Nearly a decade ago EnCana, one of the world’s largest natural gas producers, began a risky and experimental drilling program that applied intense hydraulic fracturing for shallow coalbed methane throughout central Alberta. Ms. Ernst’s statement of claim alleges that EnCana broke multiple provincial laws and regulations and contaminated a shallow aquifer that supplied drinking water to the Rosebud community with natural gas and toxic industry-related chemicals. The claim methodically reports how Alberta’s two key groundwater regulators, Alberta Environment and the ERCB, “failed to follow the investigation and enforcement processes that they had established and publicized.” The allegations have yet to be proven in court.
Hydraulic fracturing uses “brute force” to blast open oil, gas and coal formations with highly pressurized chemical fluids or gases. It is the subject of serious government investigations throughout North America. In 2002, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment held a Linking Water Science to Policy Workshop. The workshop report concluded that unconventional natural gas drilling posed a real threat to groundwater quality and quantity, and that the nation needs “baseline hydrogeological investigations…to be able to recognize and track groundwater contaminants.” Not until nine years later on September 21 2011, did the Canadian government announce that it would initiate two studies to determine whether hydraulic fracturing is harming the environment.
UNANIMA International chose Ms. Ernst as its awardee this year as a part of its international “Water = Life” campaign. “Access to life-giving water is an essential right for all life forms,” stated the UNANIMA coordinator, Catherine Ferguson. “Our members have experienced fracking as an enormous danger to their fresh water supply wherever it is carried out. We applaud Ms. Ernst’s courage in standing up for her rights.”
The award and a lecture by Ms. Ernst will be given at the 10th Anniversary reception for UNANIMA International in New York at the Church Center of the United Nations, 777 UN Plaza, just across from the United Nations building on East 44th Street. The event begins at 11:00 am.
UNANIMA International
211 East 43rd Street, Room 1207
New York, NY 10017
Tel:/Fax 212-370-0075 (Office)
www.unanima-international.org

___________________________________________________

UNANIMA International Prix Femme de Courage

NEW YORK, New York (1er Octobre 2011) UNANIMA International, un ONG qui travaille pour la justice au niveau international en harmonie avec la charte des Nations Unies pour améliorer les conditions économiques et sociales de tous les peuples, a célébré son 10e anniversaire samedi en présentant son prix Femme de Courage à Jessica Ernst de Rosebud, en Alberta, reconnue internationalement pour ses efforts à tenir les compagnies redevables pour les dommages environnementaux causés par la fracturation hydraulique.
Mme Ernst, une scientifique âgée de 54 ans avec 30 ans d’expérience avec l’industrie pétrolière, entame un procès contre le gouvernement de l’Alberta, l’Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) et EnCana, les accusant de négligence et d’activités illégales.
Il y a presque une décennie de cela, EnCana, l’une des compagnies gazières les plus importantes de la planète, a commencé un programme expérimental de forages qui consistait à fracturer hydrauliquement à la recherche du méthane dans les couches peu profondes de charbon au travers la région centrale de l’Alberta. La déclaration de Mme Ernst prétend qu’EnCana a enfreint à plusieurs lois et règlements provinciaux et aurait contaminé un aquifère superficiel qui fournissait de l’eau potable à la communauté de Rosebud avec du gaz naturel et des chimiques toxiques associés à l’industrie. La réclamation rapporte méthodiquement comment les deux principaux principaux régulateurs des eaux souterraines de l’Alberta, Alberta Environment et l’ERCB, ont failli dans leur devoir de suivre l’enquête et le processus de mise en application qu’ils avaient déterminé et publicisé. La preuve de ces allégations doit être faite en cour de justice.
La fracturation hydraulique utilise la force brute pour éclater les formations géologiques contenant du pétrole, du gaz ou du charbon grâce à des fluides ou des gaz injectés à haute pression. C’est un sujet sous enquêtes gouvernementales sérieuses partout en Amérique du Nord. En 2002, le Conseil canadien des ministres de l’environnement ont tenu un atelier sur les sciences de l’eau et les politiques. Le rapport de l’atelier a conclu que le forage pour le gaz naturel non conventionnel était une menace réelle à la qualité de l’eau souterraine et sa quantité, et que la nation devait faire une enquête hydrogéologique pour établir un niveau de référence afin de pouvoir reconnaître et suivre les contaminants dans les eaux souterraines. Enfin, 9 années plus tard, le 21 septembre 2011, le gouvernement canadien a annoncé qu’il lancerait 2 études afin de déterminer si la fracturation hydraulique nuit à l’environnement.
UNANIMA International a choisi Mme Ernst comme récipiendaire cette année en partie à cause de sa campagne internationale Eau=Vie. “L’accès à l’eau, source de toute vie, est un droit essentiel pour toutes les êtres vivants”, affirme Catherine Ferguson, coordonnatrice de UNANIMA. “Nos membres ont constaté que la fracturation est une menace importante pour leur source d’eau douce partout où il s’en fait. Nous applaudissons le courage de Mme Ernst qui défend ses droits.”
La cérémonie de remise de prix et une conférence donnée par Mme Ernst se dérouleront à la réception du 10e anniversaire d’UNANIMA International à New York au Church Center des Nations Unies, 777 UN Plaza, en face de l’édifice des Nations Unies sur la 44e Street East, à 11:00 heures.
UNANIMA International
211 East 43rd Street, Chambre 1207
New York, NY 10017
Tel:/Fax 212-370-0075 (Office)
www.unanima-international.org






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