Thursday, June 1, 2017

--You can also send a letter to: Points West Limited Partnership 2375 Carrington Place Oakville, Ontario L6J 5P5 Phone: 613-739-8538 Fax: 613-739-7440-----------POINTS WEST LIVING PROBE --Between 2008 and 2013, Alberta Health Services (AHS) gave the company more than $32 million to build six facilities. Ongoing operating funding from AHS to operators like Points West Living averaged between $25,000 and $65,500 per bed in 2014/15. Additional AHS funding is also available to cover expenses such as medical equipment and facility upgrades.-----Workers at the PWL Cold Lake facility want concrete solutions on issues such as short-staffing, arbitrary scheduling and concerns about training. But instead of negotiating respectfully, PWL locked them out beginning on Dec. 16. Despite the hardships they face in the cold of the picket line, these workers remain motivated by their vision of quality seniors care provided in an environment of respectful working and living conditions for workers and residents. Their resolve has shone a light on the many problems at PWL facilities as well as exposing the deeper crisis in Alberta’s seniors care system. The outcome of their struggle will certainly impact the negotiations for both first contracts at the Stettler and Slave Lake sites as well as the re-negotiations at Century Park and Heritage House. Their determination could also help raise standards for many more seniors care workers across the province.


Like most private businesses Points West Living appears to reward the top dogs in the company very well while staffing its facilities in Alberta with mostly casual staff earning lower than average wages for a ton of work.
While I understand that companies don't work for customers but for their own goals, it's rather startling to see the differences in compensation at the top of the company versus the bottom
So what did the CEO and top staff get?
https://d10k7k7mywg42z.cloudfront.net/…/16183PointsWest_New…
• Points West Living’s CEO Doug Mills, VicePresident
of Operations George Rath and
Vice-President of Human Resources and
Administration Paul Melanson each own an
8.3 per cent share in Points West Inc. profits in
addition to their regular salaries and additional
compensation. In 2015, these bonuses were
set at $175,000 for Rath and Melanson and
$250,000 for Mills.
***
What did the front line staff get for salary rate?
The average wage for Points West Living
employees represented by AUPE is
approximately $21/hour, and most staff
members are employed on a casual or parttime
basis.
What is the staffing complement at these facilities?
EMPLOYMENT STATUS OF POINTS WEST LIVING STAFF
Casual Part Time(PT) Full Time(FT)
HERITAGE HOUSE
41
CASUAL
21
PT
12
FT
CENTURY PARK
30
CASUAL
20
PT
13
FT
COLD LAKE
26
CASUAL
18
PT
15
FT
**
At each facility you have a small group of full time staff. In Cold Lake there are 15 FT staff. Then you have 18 part time staff. The majority of staff are casual employees--26 of them. Wow. It's no wonder that there are problems in care at facilities if most of the staff are casual. In Cold Lake apparently there is also a high turnover of staff which does nothing to help out residents. It also doesn't help when the employer cuts staff hours as noted here:
Cuts to staff hours and positions have left employees struggling to meet residents’ needs due to increased
workloads. Only a small number of staff are employed on a full-time basis, and staff turnover is a consistent
problem, particularly at the Cold Lake facility.

I note that the Tucker family case involves a Points West Facility in Grande Prairie. The workers in Cold Lake were fired from a Points West facility as well. Are there problems with this company all over Alberta?
http://www.pwlprobe.com/united-we-bargain/

What’s This All About Anyway?

Points West Living (PWL) is one of the fastest growing and most profitable seniors care providers in Alberta, but workers and residents alike at their facilities have serious concerns about how the company prioritizes profits over providing quality care in a respectful living and working environment.
Over 160 PWL employees have already voted to join the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees so that they can be empowered to demand some accountability from their employer by forming a union and insisting on respectful treatment of both workers and residents alike. (Not a member yet? Click here for information on joining AUPE).
AUPE members at four PWL sites have been negotiating with their employer for a fair contract that respects the value of their work and addresses their concerns about the quality of care for the residents they serve.
Workers at the PWL Cold Lake facility want concrete solutions on issues such as short-staffing, arbitrary scheduling and concerns about training. But instead of negotiating respectfully, PWL locked them out beginning on Dec. 16. Despite the hardships they face in the cold of the picket line, these workers remain motivated by their vision of quality seniors care provided in an environment of respectful working and living conditions for workers and residents.
Their resolve has shone a light on the many problems at PWL facilities as well as exposing the deeper crisis in Alberta’s seniors care system. The outcome of their struggle will certainly impact the negotiations for both first contracts at the Stettler and Slave Lake sites as well as the re-negotiations at Century Park and Heritage House. Their determination could also help raise standards for many more seniors care workers across the province.
As such, it is important that you support their struggle as much you can.

What can you do?

Contact PWL and government representatives to let them know you stand united with the Cold Lake workers. Click here to send a message.
Keep in touch! If you can visit the Cold Lake picket line, it would mean a lot to these workers and they are grateful for the support they have already received. You can also keep in touch by sharing messages of support and signing up to receive updates.
https://d10k7k7mywg42z.cloudfront.net/assets/57b224a2d4c9610469098de0/16183PointsWest_Newsletter_Vol2.pdf
POINTS WEST LIVING PROBE
Newsletter • Volume 2 • July 2016
“Eden Model” at odds with low-wage, casualized staffing
Points West Living professes to follow the Eden Model of Care, an approach to seniors care that emphasizes residents’ individuality and choice. However, cuts to staffing, increased workloads for existing employees and high staff turnover at their facilities contradict the goals of the Eden Model. According to the company’s website, the Eden philosophy focuses on “wellness rather than illness” in creating communities “where medical treatment is the servant of genuine human caring, rather than its master.” At the core of this philosophy is an
emphasis on choice: “Residents decide when they rest, when they rise, and when their suites are cleaned.” However, Points West Living does not maintain the staffing levels necessary to provide such flexibility while still ensuring that residents’ health and personal care needs are met. Long-term employees have seen their workloads increase, and hours for support staff such as recreational therapists have been cut back. High staff turnover and casual or parttime employment means that caregivers 
are unable to form long-term relationships with residents and their family members. Without these relationships, staff are not able to recognize each resident’s individuality and respect their unique preferences. Staff retention is a particular concern at Points West Living Cold Lake. Nearly half of the employees have been there for less than a year. Wages below industry standards, high cost of living, and oil and gas layoffs affecting other family and community members have contributed to high staff turnover.

Yet despite these problems, the company is considering further staff cuts which would lead to further increased workloads and even less one-on-one time with residents. In April, Points West Living announced that they intended to lay off more Licensed Practical Nurses at the same time as hiring a new “Wellness Supervisor.” “Simply talking about wellness on glossy brochures and websites falls short of a genuine commitment to quality care for Alberta seniors,” said AUPE Vice-President Mike Dempsey. “Quality care can only occur when staff are treated respectfully and compensated fairly. Only then will you see long-term relationships develop that respect the unique needs and personalities of each resident.”
EMPLOYMENT STATUS OF POINTS WEST LIVING STAFF Casual Part Time(PT) Full Time(FT) HERITAGE HOUSE 41 CASUAL 21 PT 12 FT CENTURY PARK 30 CASUAL 20 PT 13 FT COLD LAKE 26 CASUAL 18 PT 15 FT Cuts to staff hours and positions have left employees struggling to meet residents’ needs due to increased workloads. Only a small number of staff are employed on a full-time basis, and staff turnover is a consistent problem, particularly at the Cold Lake facility.

For-profit seniors care funded by taxpayer dollars

Points West Living is Alberta’s largest privately owned operator of supporting living residences. The company also receives millions of dollars of taxpayer funding each year to build and operate their facilities. Yet it may surprise many Albertans to learn that this profitable company does not need to publicly report how it uses taxpayer funds it receives. Although Points West Living is already the largest for-profit player in seniors care in Alberta, the company has plans to expand aggressively. Point West Living purchased Connecting Care, which operated seven properties under the Points West Living name, for $100 million in 2015. Steve Suske, who spearheaded the sale, plans to expand the company’s value to $500 million over the next three to five years. Between 2008 and 2013, Alberta Health Services (AHS) gave the company more than
$32 million to build six facilities. Ongoing operating funding from AHS to operators like Points West Living averaged between $25,000 and $65,500 per bed in 2014/15. Additional AHS funding is also available to cover expenses such as medical equipment and facility upgrades. However, it is not possible for Points West Living residents, staff or other concerned Albertans to learn how seniors care operators like Points West Living are using taxpayer funds. For example, although AHS provides funding intended to cover wages for frontline workers, it does not prevent companies from diverting a part of those funds to other purposes. The dollar figures for Points West Living corporate profit and taxpayer funding are all the more staggering when compared to compensation for frontline workers.
The average wage for Points West Living employees represented by AUPE is approximately $21/hour, and most staff members are employed on a casual or parttime basis.
Did you know? • After a sale in 2015 valued at approximately $100 million, all Points West Living sites are owned by the same Ontario-based company. • In the year before the sale, Points West Living profits increased 46 per cent, rising from $864,593 to $1,262,636. • Points West Living’s CEO Doug Mills, VicePresident of Operations George Rath and Vice-President of Human Resources and Administration Paul Melanson each own an 8.3 per cent share in Points West Inc. profits in addition to their regular salaries and additional compensation. In 2015, these bonuses were set at $175,000 for Rath and Melanson and $250,000 for Mills.
You can also send a letter to: Points West Limited Partnership 2375 Carrington Place Oakville, Ontario L6J 5P5 Phone: 613-739-8538 Fax: 613-739-7440
http://www.pialberta.org/visitors_banned_from_long_term_care_facilities_have_little_recourse_ej

Visitors banned from long-term care facilities have little recourse
Blog | February 20, 2014
By Karen Kleiss, Edmonton Journal
FEBRUARY 20, 2014
EDMONTON - Shauna McHarg hasn’t seen her father in nearly two years because she is banned from his floor at the continuing care home where he lives. She is only allowed to visit her mother there one hour each day. She missed their 50th wedding anniversary.
Hugette Hebert wanted to see her husband’s diaper change so she could assess his condition, but doctors said no. When she refused to leave the room she was banned for a day, and the security guard who escorted her from the building told her that if she continued to cause trouble she could be banned forever and might never see her husband again.James Tucker hid a video camera in his disabled wife’s room and alleges he captured abuse on tape. When he angrily expressed his concerns, he says he was banned from the facility for a month.
Albertans who believe they have been unjustly barred from visiting loved ones at care facilities can face years of appeals that end with a toothless recommendation from Alberta’s Ombudsman.Ultimately, only facility managers have the power to let them back in. “I just want to see my parents, and let my family heal from this horrible, horrible experience,” McHarg said. She believes she was banned because she complained about the treatment her mother received in Covenant Health’s Edmonton General Continuing Care Centre, but the facility won’t tell her precisely why.In a process that took nearly three years, she challenged the ban through Alberta Health Services Patient Relations right up to the provincial Ombudsman, who ruled she was not treated fairly.
She took her case to Alberta’s Information Commissioner, who also ruled in her favour and said Covenant Health should give her the documents that explain why she can’t see her father. Covenant appealed to the Court of Queen’s Bench, and McHarg will plead her case there Thursday. “No one in Covenant Health is accountable. … There is no transparency,” McHarg said. “It shouldn’t be a legal battle to know why these restrictions are imposed.”Covenant Health spokeswoman Charlene Morrison said she can’t comment on a case before the courts but generally, decisions are made in the best interests of patients. Concerns are addressed first by the care team, and escalate to patient relations and then to Clinical Ethics Services, a neutral third party inside Covenant Health.
Hugette Herbert’s late husband, Jack Rudichuk, also lived at a Covenant Health facility, Villa Caritas. A former university professor, Hebert never contested the one-day ban, but after that day she feared raising concerns with staff.“When you’re in that situation, many families are fearful that if they say too much, their loved ones…will suffer the consequences,” Hebert said.“I felt completely disempowered, abused, and afraid to do anything because I was afraid that I would be banned for longer, and that’s what the security guard said.  He said ‘If you don’t comply, you could be banned forever, and you’ll never see your husband again.’ Bill Moore-Kilgannon of Public Interest Alberta says the existing system is "absolutely unacceptable."
"The families have next to no power in these situations,” he said. “The formal channels that exist are so weak and cumbersome they just don’t know what to do.”The solution is to make Alberta’s new Senior’s Advocate independent and to establish family care councils in law, he said, giving them the authority to swiftly resolve disputes and complaints. A spokesman for Health Minister Fred Horne declined to comment. Alberta Health Services spokesman Kerry Williamson said “in most cases, visitors who are negatively affecting patient or client care can sign a behaviour agreement, which would then allow visits to proceed provided they adhere to that agreement.
“Our Patient Relations department is also available if family members or visitors have concerns. And, a concern can be raised with the Ombudsman. “We must also ensure that we protect our staff from abuse,” Williamson said. Ombudsman spokesman Paul Michna said that while recommendations are not binding, they are delivered to the highest levels of Alberta Health Services and are usually implemented. James Tucker has been banned twice from the Points West Living facility in Grande Prairie, where his wife lives with a degenerative disability. The facility won’t comment on his case, but general manager Ronda Hartegen said in a statement that “the only situations where we consider limiting access to our sites is when the safety or well-being of our employees or residents is in jeopardy.”
“Of the 650 residents Points West Living cares for daily, we only have one situation where a visitor has been restricted access.” Tucker, a miner and valve technician, said he was never a rabble-rouser until his wife went into care. When he was banned, he worried himself sick. “I have power of attorney for my wife, I am supposed to be there, I am her voice,” he said. Now he visits her every day, sometimes more than once. He fears raising his concerns with the facility, but continues nonetheless. “You feel like you’re some kind of criminal for trying to protect your wife,” he said. “But I have to do something; I have to help my wife.”
kkleiss@edmontonjournal.com


Julie Ali
 shared Stephen Tucker's post.
16 mins
Stephen Tucker added 4 new photos — with Tammilee Rideout-Tucker.
April 27
PLEASE SHARE!!!! It breaks by heart to have my mom in a emergency room bed were at least dad can now visit her . A care home in grande prairie has abused my mom for the last time . We are now taking up space in an emergency room while awaiting for a doctor to help us find a spot . The care home today slammed the door in my face as I tried to talk to them. As I had to remove mom s belongings out of there so the abuse can't continue. Dad fought with them for years with documentation and pics plenty of proof to put them under . But everyone turns a blind eye to the abuse and call it un founded . The judge without any looking at foundings or proof just say your banned and any further cost comes to dad? How does a retirement man pay for lawyer fees. I want this banning my dad from the care home for a full year without visiting rights to go viral . He has legal guardianship to be her voice from a court but means nothing . How does the justice system work ? She cannot speak for herself . Please share the shit outta this . Media here I come

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