Saturday, June 17, 2017

--They followed plumes of pollution from the oilsands as they headed downwind, watching the chemicals transform into SOAs along the way. SOAs begin forming almost immediately, and continue forming as long as the raw ingredients are still around — and they can "hang around for a week or more," Liggio said. The measurements showed that the types of heavy petroleum products emitted by the oilsands react unusually quickly and produce far more SOAs than similar quantities of lighter petroleum products, such as gasoline.-------------------------According to the paper, SOAs make up more than half of the particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in size in many locations in the Northern Hemisphere. The World Health organization says particles of that size are small enough to be inhaled deep into the lungs, where they cause chronic inflammation. Long-term exposure significantly boosts the risk of dying of cardiopulmonary illnesses, and there is no evidence of a safe level of exposure. As for environmental effects, Liggio says scientists are still trying to figure out how SOAs deposited in soil and water affect ecosystems.-----According to the World Health Organization, particulate matter is linked to respiratory problems such as asthma, along with increased deaths from cardiovascular disease and lung cancer.-------------

Julie Ali
2 mins

I note that the scientists are going to look at the environmental consequences of the SOAs but isn't it odd that no one is studying the health consequences of folks exposed to these pollutants?
I mean would not this be the first thing government should consider and yet we have no sort of work done by Alberta Health or AHS to look into the health problems due to SOA creation by the oil and gas industry.
This sort of longitudinal work needs to be done.

Alberta's oilsands industry is one of the biggest sources in North America of harmful air pollutants called secondary organic aerosols, a new Environment Canada study has…
CBC.CA

If SOAs are forming particulate matter (PM) that is being deposited in Edmonton and elsewhere and the PM is implicated in health problems such as asthma, cardiovascular disease and lung cancer, why haven't we had Alberta Health and AHS doing health studies?
Or are they expecting the front office of big oil--the AER which has no mandate to work in the public interest or really look into health problems of pollution created by big oil--to do this work for them?
If you just look at the response for CAPP it's all very positive spin. The folk sat CAPP don't know what pollutant creation means apparently. Well if they don't know I can tell them. It means bad news for the oil and gas industry in Alberta because citizens like myself want to know why government is not doing health studies based on these pollution discoveries. No point in acting innocent and no point in expecting big oil to tell us what this science means. We're going to have to activate ourselves as citizens to get the GOA to do it's job in the interest of public health.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/oilsands-soas-1.3599074
Terry Abel, director of oilsands for the Canadian Association for Petroleum Producers, said the results of the study provide new information to the industry and that's "absolutely" valuable.
"We don't know … what this actually means in terms of environmental effects or impacts on the environment," he added. "But what it does do is help us understand the fate and behaviour of some of the emissions associated with oilsands production. That may help inform future work as we're monitoring other results in the atmosphere."
**********
Is everyone waiting for the federal government to do work that should be done by the provincial health ministry and AHS?


http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/oilsands-soas-1.3599074

Alberta's oilsands industry is a huge source of harmful air pollution, study says

Oilsands one of the largest producers of secondary organic aerosols in North America, Environment Canada finds

By Emily Chung, CBC News Posted: May 25, 2016 1:00 PM ET Last Updated: May 25, 2016 10:24 PM ET
An aerial image shows a portion of an open pit oilsands mine in Alberta. Chemicals released from mines like this one react with other compounds in the atmosphere to generate harmful pollutants called secondary organic aerosols.
An aerial image shows a portion of an open pit oilsands mine in Alberta. Chemicals released from mines like this one react with other compounds in the atmosphere to generate harmful pollutants called secondary organic aerosols. (Environment Canada)
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Alberta's oilsands industry is one of the biggest sources in North America of harmful air pollutants called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), a new Environment Canada study has found.
SOAs are formed when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted directly by the oilsands are exposed to sunlight and react with oxygen and other compounds in the atmosphere. VOCs emitted by cars, other industrial processes, and plants can also generate SOAs.
Because SOAs are relatively heavy, they form particles and become a significant component of pollution known as "particulate matter," or PM.
According to the World Health Organization, particulate matter is linked to respiratory problems such as asthma, along with increased deaths from cardiovascular disease and lung cancer.
The new study reports Alberta's oilsands generate 45 to 84 tonnes of SOAs a day, comparable to daily output of the Greater Toronto Area, the largest metropolis in Canada — even though the oilsands take up a relatively small area, geographically.
NRC aircraft
In August and September of 2013, the research team took more than 20 four-hour flights over the oilsands aboard a National Research Council aircraft. (Environment and Climate Change Canada)
That would make Alberta's oilsands either the largest or second largest source of SOAs in Canada, and one of the top 10 in all of North America, says Environment and Climate Change Canada research scientist John Liggio, lead author of the report published today in the journal Nature.
Shao-Meng Li, another Environment Canada research scientist and principal investigator for the project, said the researchers knew that the oilsands were producing SOAs. "What surprised us, I think to an extent, was the magnitude."
It appears that the oilsands are unusually efficient at making SOAs compared to other sources.
Once airborne, the pollutants can be blown as far away as Ontario before being deposited in soil and water, although most probably remain in Alberta. The highest concentrations of oilsands SOAs are likely to end up in Edmonton, and the levels from the oilsands may be higher than the levels produced by the city itself, Liggio said.

Environmental impact assessment

It's the first time scientists have measured pollutants produced indirectly from oilsands emissions.
"Such production should be considered when assessing the environmental impacts of current and planned bitumen and heavy oil extraction projects globally," the researchers wrote.
Inside aircraft
The aircraft was loaded with sophisticated scientific instruments designed to measure air pollutants. (Environment and Climate Change Canada)
The study was part of a joint Canada-Alberta oilsands environmental monitoring project launched in 2012 that looked at impacts on biodiversity, water and air quality.
Liggio and Li were looking at air quality, including what and how much pollution were being emitted.
"As air quality scientists, we know that everything that's emitted reacts in the atmosphere to form something else," Liggio said. "It's that something else we were interested in, and it's that something else that perhaps wasn't really considered in the past."
Plane in flight
The researchers followed plumes of pollution from the oilsands as they headed downwind, watching the chemicals transform into SOAs along the way. (Environment and Climate Change Canada)
In August and September of 2013, the team took more than 20 four-hour flights aboard a National Research Council aircraft loaded with sophisticated scientific instruments designed to measure air pollutants. They followed plumes of pollution from the oilsands as they headed downwind, watching the chemicals transform into SOAs along the way.
SOAs begin forming almost immediately, and continue forming as long as the raw ingredients are still around — and they can "hang around for a week or more," Liggio said.
The measurements showed that the types of heavy petroleum products emitted by the oilsands react unusually quickly and produce far more SOAs than similar quantities of lighter petroleum products, such as gasoline.

No easy fix

Cutting those SOA emissions may not be easy.
"You can't stop the chemistry happening in the atmosphere," Liggio said. The only approach that could work is to reduce the emissions of chemicals that react to form SOAs, but even that is tricky because many of them are thought to originate from open pit mines, where they would be difficult to contain.
However, Li said the researchers are interested to know more about where the emissions come from, as they may be more easily controlled from facilities such as plants where the bitumen is processed.
John Liggio Shao-Meng Li
The study was led by John Liggio and Shao-Meng Li as part of a joint Canada-Alberta oilsands environmental monitoring project launched in 2012 that looked at impacts on biodiversity, water and air quality. (John Liggio and Shao-Meng Li)
According to the paper, SOAs make up more than half of the particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in size in many locations in the Northern Hemisphere.
The World Health organization says particles of that size are small enough to be inhaled deep into the lungs, where they cause chronic inflammation. Long-term exposure significantly boosts the risk of dying of cardiopulmonary illnesses, and there is no evidence of a safe level of exposure.
As for environmental effects, Liggio says scientists are still trying to figure out how SOAs deposited in soil and water affect ecosystems.

Valuable to industry

Terry Abel, director of oilsands for the Canadian Association for Petroleum Producers, said the results of the study provide new information to the industry and that's "absolutely" valuable.
"We don't know … what this actually means in terms of environmental effects or impacts on the environment," he added. "But what it does do is help us understand the fate and behaviour of some of the emissions associated with oilsands production. That may help inform future work as we're monitoring other results in the atmosphere."
He noted that the joint Alberta-Canada monitoring program that the study was a part of was funded by industry.
The Alberta Energy Regulator (AER), which is responsible for regulating the oilsands industry and conducting environmental assessments for oilsands projects, told CBC News in an email that it will "review the study and take time to understand how, or if, the information will be applied to climate change regulations within our industry in the future." However, the agency said it's too early to tell what the regulations will look like or how the policy is going to be implemented, as it is still awaiting direction from government.


Most intense at the heart of the open pit mines, the tar sands emit Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOAs), a kind of air pollution that gets inhaled deeply into the lungs, where they cause chronic inflammation.
Long-term exposure significantly boosts the risk of dying of cardiopulmonary illnesses, and there is no evidence of a safe level of exposure
Precise knowledge of the toxic effects on ecosystems are unknown.#HealtheTarSands #ShutItDown #RemediateNow

Alberta's oilsands industry is one of the biggest sources in North America of harmful air pollutants called secondary organic aerosols, a new Environment Canada study…
CBC.CA
Comments
David N-Dorrington Canada's shame.

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2
6 hrs
LedaRose Cedar I recall when it was totally unfavorable to all and sundry. Then Trudeau, #SmellyPantsLiar shows up and phew does it stink in Ottawa now.

Reply5 hrs
Polly Wilson We are doing everyone a disservice to continue to use the bitumen from the oil sands, even the people working there. Time for investment in a new industry, rather than fight for the old poison.

Reply
6
5 hrs
Diane Rozzano-Barraclough Albertans don't care as long as they're making money along with the Koch bros.

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3
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Paul DelMaschio too true .........the american oligarch polluters

Reply1 hr
Cindy L Aspden And the propaganda has been so effective, I'm of the opinion, that most Canadians don't realize we subsidize it so private corps can profit while destroying our environment.

Reply
5 hrs
Rebecca Sluchinski So many other healthier options and natural resources than killing everybody and everything out there for money and politics. It's unacceptable as we all are simbiant creatures on this beautiful planet we all call home.

Reply
5
4 hrs
Robert J Bertrand One of the largest environmental disasters on record.

Reply
4
4 hrs
Paul DelMaschio with most of the money going to the USA and the Koch brothers .....welcome to colonized province of alberta !

Reply1 hr
Richard Kudra Nice View of the Spew! Canada's new tourism Industry ... Toxic Tours !!

Reply
3
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Michael Bressette Aint it the truth kill the environmernt for profit,

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1
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Cameron Mcdonald Heres a reality check...regardless of whatever you post..production is increasing..period..end of discussion..so eat that breath it..whatever..this is the real world..

Reply2 hrs
Paul DelMaschio your eating and breathing it also and it won't change unless YOU do something ...real world .

Reply
1
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Cameron Mcdonald Lol..believe what you want..they are not stopping..

Reply1 hr
John Termaten Cameron Mcdonald your kids will thank you.

Reply41 mins
Cameron Mcdonald Yes..they do every day ...

Reply35 mins
Rowan Kent Look what the government of Canada allows to go on, wtf renewable energy is the only way this is what killing our planet looks like

Reply
2
1 hr
Heath Purdy Long gone past time to close them down

Reply
1
1 hr
Ray Morris It must be true because Al Gore and David Suzuki said so!

Reply1 hr
Deanna Hyldig Ritchie Completely nuts this hazard exists. What will it take??!! When will we learn??!! Who is responsible?

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Julie Ali As for environmental effects, Liggio says scientists are still trying to figure out how SOAs deposited in soil and water affect ecosystems.---Why has no one asked what the health effects on human beings are in Edmonton and elsewhere? Curious.

ReplyJust now

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