Monday, June 5, 2017

“There's no place for her to go,” Webster said. “They have abandoned us. I just hope Hands is using this time to come up with a crisis response for Robyn.”---Hawkins said Hands is trying to find them as close as possible, but it looks like they are 90 minutes to two hours away. “We're working with our community partners. Unfortunately, there is nothing in this area for Robyn. “This is a very unique circumstance,” he said.-----------Robyn is nonverbal autistic. She was diagnosed with autism at about 18 months and started to self-harm by the age of 11. Robyn has inflicted countless bruises to her face, sustained a broken nose and caused blindness in one eye from the blunt force of her fists to her face. In January, Robyn was moved into a family home operated by Hands: The Family Help Network that offers 24-hour care for children with complex needs.---“She loves it there,” Webster said. But a week ago Webster was notified her daughter's spot at the family home was being terminated because Robyn requires a greater degree of care. Jeffrey Hawkins, executive director of Hands, said he intends to meet with family by the end of the week to review options for Robyn.--

Families all over Canada have problems taking care of handicapped children especially as they grow older. The problems of autistic children are immense and the resources to help them aren't in place which puts the family in a very stressful situation. When the child has to be taken care of outside the home the child has a right to stability. But sometimes the caregivers aren't able to provide the care for whatever reason. Then the child or youth is discharged into the community -usually a hospital. This sort of untenable placement destabilizes the child/ youth and ends up costing the system more cash than required if they had proper placements for these children and /or better services to support families so that the children could stay home. How many of these cases will we hear about before we get together as families of handicapped children and find the solutions to these problems ourselves? Government has never been the answer. The machinery of government is not agile enough and money is always a problem. It's up to us. Here is yet another story from Ontario where the system can't do what it is supposed to do which is care for the most severely handicapped citizens. In this case the excuse is given that there is nothing local. Why not? It's not right that this family be separated from their child and dumped in a hospital. This eviction should be seen for what it is --an abandonment of a child in need. Shameful. The human rights of this child were not considered.


http://www.nugget.ca/2017/05/26/no-place-in-north-bay-for-severely-autistic-daughter

Hawkins said Hands is trying to find them as close as possible, but it looks like they are 90 minutes to two hours away.
“We're working with our community partners. Unfortunately, there is nothing in this area for Robyn.
“This is a very unique circumstance,” he said.
***
Michelle Webster states the situation more clearly without the bureaucratic double speak for what is an eviction:

http://www.nugget.ca/2017/05/26/no-place-in-north-bay-for-severely-autistic-daughter

“There's no place for her to go,” Webster said. “They have abandoned us. I just hope Hands is using this time to come up with a crisis response for Robyn.”


Hands: The Family Help Network evicts this teenager with autism and she is now in a hospital. They tell the family that she needs a higher level of care. So my question is why don't they upgrade their care plan and provide this higher level of care? Why is this severely autistic girl now in a hospital costing taxpayers more money than would be required to provide her an upgraded level of care at the place she was before she was evicted?
Surely there is some common sense left in the system in Ontario? Or is the entire nation unable to provide integrated care for children, youth and adults with disabilities?


LikeShow more reactions
Comment
LikeShow more reactions
ReplyJust now

http://www.nugget.ca/2017/05/26/no-place-in-north-bay-for-severely-autistic-daughter


No place in North Bay for severely autistic daughter


Robyn Webster, 15, remains at North Bay Regional Health Centre following a violent incident last week during which the teen harmed herself. Robyn's mother, Michelle, is upset Hands: The Family Help Network has terminated Robyn's spot from the family home she has been living in since January. Hands said it hopes to meet with the family this week to discuss possible options.
Submitted photo
Robyn Webster, 15, remains at North Bay Regional Health Centre following a violent incident last week during which the teen harmed herself. Robyn's mother, Michelle, is upset Hands: The Family Help Network has terminated Robyn's spot from the family home she has been living in since January. Hands said it hopes to meet with the family this week to discuss possible options. Submitted photo
Michelle Webster has reached a breaking point.
“The stress has put me over the edge. I'm broken. I'm done,” she said Thursday afternoon from the North Bay Regional Health Centre.
Webster has been fighting on behalf of her daughter, Robyn.
Robyn, 15, was admitted to the hospital just over two weeks ago after punching herself in the face until she was black and blue.
“She's hitting herself because she wants to tell you she's hurting,” Webster said.
“This was bad, but I can tell you it has been much worse. The bruising has been so bad, I didn't recognize her. She was black, blue, yellow, purple and green.”
Robyn is nonverbal autistic. She was diagnosed with autism at about 18 months and started to self-harm by the age of 11.
Robyn has inflicted countless bruises to her face, sustained a broken nose and caused blindness in one eye from the blunt force of her fists to her face.
In January, Robyn was moved into a family home operated by Hands: The Family Help Network that offers 24-hour care for children with complex needs.
Webster said the family spent a year contemplating the move and  was assured staff were aware of Robyn's needs.
“She loves it there,” Webster said.
But a week ago Webster was notified her daughter's spot at the family home was being terminated because Robyn requires a greater degree of care.
Jeffrey Hawkins, executive director of Hands, said he intends to meet with family by the end of the week to review options for Robyn.
“The family needs to be part of the discussion,” he said Thursday. “There are options for Robyn. However, they're not local, they're not in the North Bay community.”
Hawkins said Hands is trying to find them as close as possible, but it looks like they are 90 minutes to two hours away.
“We're working with our community partners. Unfortunately, there is nothing in this area for Robyn.
“This is a very unique circumstance,” he said.
Webster said as of Thursday afternoon she still had no idea what that means or what options Robyn has left.
“They (Hands) assured us they were up for this challenge. They told us they could deal with Robyn and they wouldn't leave her,” she said. “We told them when we were discussing the idea of moving Robyn into (the family home) that if they couldn't handle her needs to let us know, because it would be more harmful to move her in and out of facilities.”
Robyn has been moved from the hospital's critical care unit to the paediatric ward. It's unknown how long she will remain in hospital.
“There's no place for her to go,” Webster said. “They have abandoned us. I just hope Hands is using this time to come up with a crisis response for Robyn.”
Webster said it's becoming more difficult to see her daughter in the hospital.
“She uses her iPad and eye movements. She looks at me and starts to cry and says 'car.'
“I know she wants to get out of the hospital. There's no reason for Robyn to be living in the hospital.”
Webster said the hospital has been the family's saving grace and a champion for the family.
She said she's been assured Robyn will not be discharged with no place to go.
“I would have preferred to be working with Hands, but they're not picking up the telephone,” Webster said. “They're not talking to us.”

No comments:

Post a Comment