Wednesday, June 7, 2017

The 50-year-old Deschamps said she placed Danika in foster care when she was four months old, because the girl's immune system was compromised and she had juvenile diabetes. While it was a heartbreaking decision, she felt she had no choice because the community did not have the medical care the girl needed.---Deschamps was shocked by news her daughter had been placed on life support last Wednesday at the Royal Alexandra Hospital. She learned about it two days later, when a doctor contacted her through the on-reserve child welfare agency.---She said Danika suffered complications from taking a sleeping pill.-----Friends and family held a drum ceremony outside court to celebrate the court decision. "The reason why we're here is to have a child released to the mother so we can conduct our ceremonies," said Louis Bull Chief Irvin Bull. "This situation should not have happened."-------



Rest peacefully, beauty.
First Nations mother wins right to daughter's remains over foster parent...
Continue Reading
Comments

Julie Ali This situation should not have happened. In the absence of written instructions by the fostered individual who must be an adult, the birth parents' wishes and cultural practices should dominate. I can't understand why the GOA has not enshrined these matters into policy so that this sort of requirement to go to court is averted. Poor performance by the GOA. Also why are children being given up to foster families in order to receive medical attention for diabetes? Why could this child have not got the help she needed in her own family and community? There is a big disparity in services that needs to be remedied by the federal government. I see no changes to date. Team Trudeau is no better than Team Harper in the matter of health care services for First Nations communities.

ReplyJust now





Policy should be in place to guide the end of life decision making in foster care and the birth parents' wishes / cultural practices should take precedence over the written instructions of adult fostered folks.
I mean if the culture says one thing and the foster family does another thing this is disrespectful in my mind.
Also I can't understand why any First Nations family would have to give up a child to be fostered so as to get medical help for juvenile diabetes and any other condition. First Nations families have the right to the same level of care as the families in the cities so I can't see how the federal government has got away with downgraded services. Unless of course no one cares?



I tend to agree with Louis Bull Chief Irvin Bull that this situation should not have happened. In the absence of documentation a policy should indicate that the birth parents' wishes and cultural practices take precedence. Mind boggling this had to go to court for resolution.

More importantly to me is why this mum gave up the child because of a lack of medical services in her community available to service the child. What the heck? Why is there disparity in health care services by community? Where is the federal government in this mess?

While it is heartbreaking for this mum to receive her daughter back when she died my question to Team Trudeau is why are First Nations families forced to make this choice in order to provide for their children the same medical care that my sons receive in the city? Why the difference? And what is Team Trudeau doing about this disparity?

I am also puzzled by the cause of death:

She said Danika suffered complications from taking a sleeping pill.

***
What sort of complications can cause a kid to die from taking a sleeping pill? Some unanswered questions and no solutions from the government about the problems raised such as:

1) Disparity in health care services to indigenous people
2) The transfer of children to foster families to ensure they get proper medical care as in this case.
3) The lack of policy determining what happens to the foster child at death. Without the paperwork confirming an adult wanting organ donation --should the birth parents' wishes and the cultural practices of this birth family not take precedence over anything else?

Some work for both the provincial and federal governments to do.


http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/edmonton/edmonton-indigenous-first-nation-daughter-death-court-hearing-remains-1.4150135

First Nations mother wins right to daughter's remains over foster parent

'The reason why we're here is to have a child released to the mother so we can conduct our ceremonies'

Gareth Hampshire • Scott Stevenson • CBC News
6 Hours Ago
June Deschamps
June Deschamps says she's relieved she can now plan her daughter's funeral in Maskwacis after today's court ruling. (Sam Martin CBC News)
856 shares
A First Nations mother was granted the right to her daughter's remains after a hearing in an Edmonton courtroom Wednesday.
"I'm very humbled, full of emotion," said June Deschamps, a member of the Louis Bull First Nation in Maskwacis.
She petitioned the Court of Queen's Bench after she learned her 23-year-old daughter, Danika Deschamps Yellowhorse, had died Saturday and the young woman's former foster mother intended to donate her organs and cremate her remains.
PlayPoster of video clip
'I get to take my daughter home'
JUMP TO BEGINNING OF THE TRACK WATCH
ADJUST VOLUME
00:00 00:39
SHARE FULLSCREEN
'I get to take my daughter home' 0:39
Both practices are contrary to Indigenous beliefs.
While going to court over her daughter's body was draining, Deschamps said it was a battle she needed to fight.
"I get to take my daughter home," she said. "It's been a long time coming."

Daughter's immune system compromised

The 50-year-old Deschamps said she placed Danika in foster care when she was four months old, because the girl's immune system was compromised and she had juvenile diabetes.
While it was a heartbreaking decision, she felt she had no choice because the community did not have the medical care the girl needed.
Danika Deschamps Yellowhorse
Danika Deschamps Yellowhorse shown in February 2017 (Deschamps family)
She no contact with her daughter as a child, but the two reconnected three years ago, Deschamps said.
"She was awesome, she was just amazing, just like my other children," she said. "I was blown away when I first met her. She was outgoing, fun."
Deschamps was shocked by news her daughter had been placed on life support last Wednesday at the Royal Alexandra Hospital.
She learned about it two days later, when a doctor contacted her through the on-reserve child welfare agency.
She said Danika suffered complications from taking a sleeping pill.
Danika Deschamps and family
Danika Deschamps shown alongside her brothers and sisters. (Deschamps family)

Daughter hoped to donate organs, lawyer says

The lawyer for the former foster mother, who was not in court Wednesday, told the court it was the young woman's wishes to have her organs donated and her body cremated.
There were no documents to support the claim.
The former foster mother's lawyer explained her client was not in court because she was too distraught.
At the court hearing, Justice Beverly Browne ruled Deschamps is entitled to obtain the remains, saying the law is clear.
Browne said she hoped the former foster mother will be invited to and included in the funeral service.
Outside court Deschamps said she had already extended an invitation.
Chief Irvin Bull
Louis Bull First Nation Chief Irvin Bull says the situation should never have happened and hopes the court ruling means no First Nations parent has to face this kind of fight again. (Sam Martin/CBC)
Friends and family held a drum ceremony outside court to celebrate the court decision.

"The reason why we're here is to have a child released to the mother so we can conduct our ceremonies," said Louis Bull Chief Irvin Bull. "This situation should not have happened."

No comments:

Post a Comment