Monday, June 12, 2017

Pocket change for the poor and the rich get richer in Alberta. It's just the good old Tory way continued with the NDPCs.

There's the elite and there's the poor. There's the captured city council and the captured MLAs. There's the rich and there's the homeless. And we all know how these stories end up. Not in the public interest. Not in the interests of the poor. But certainly in the interests of the elite who are in charge of the government at all levels.
Money, money and more money rules the elite.
And for the poorest among us? A mattress. A place to be safe. Food. Shameful.
We supposed to be happy that the homeless got the loose change while the elite get major cash?  Really? Why should we be pleased about this...
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We supposed to be happy that the homeless got the loose change while the elite get major cash?  Really?
Why should we be pleased about this as if this is a big thing?
It's shameful.
We're giving major money to players and to the poorest we're giving bits of left over money.
Troubling that a captured Edmonton city council used citizens to finance a rich man's project while the homeless are still struggling with no way out. There's the elite. And then there's the poor. And never the two groups shall meet. This is the good old Alberta way.

Edmonton will cut the ribbon Thursday on what it calls North America's next great arena for its National Hockey League team. But that greatness comes at a cost.
GLOBALNEWS.CA
 http://globalnews.ca/news/2927009/a-look-back-at-how-edmontons-rogers-place-is-being-paid-for/
September 8, 2016 3:18 pm
Updated: September 8, 2016 5:17 pm

A look back at how Edmonton’s Rogers Place is being paid for

By Staff The Canadian Press
WATCH ABOVE: By Thursday night, tens of thousands of Edmontonians will have had their first look inside Rogers Place. It's been a long ordeal to get to the opening of the new facility. Vinesh Pratap has more.
- A A +
Edmonton will cut the ribbon Thursday on what it calls North America’s next great arena for its National Hockey League team. But that greatness comes at a cost. Here is a look at who is paying what:
Total cost: The final tab is almost $614 million which includes the arena, the land, a massive glass “Winter Garden” that stretches over the street in front, a community rink attached to the building and a connection to the city’s light-rail transit system.

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Taxpayers: The city is paying almost $313 million with much of that coming from a so-called community revitalization levy, which will see a portion of downtown property taxes redirected to the project. The city will own the building, but will lease it back to the Oilers and the team’s owner, Daryl Katz.
The team: The team is paying $166 million. Some of that is in cash, but most of it comes from rent payments to the city. The team will retain all the revenue from the operation of the building. Katz, in turn, has promised to keep the Oilers in Edmonton for at least the next 35 years.
Fans: Each person attending an event will have to pay a ticket surcharge. The deal calls for the proceeds to go to the city and be sufficient to cover the principal and interest payments, repaying $125 million over a 35-year term.
Watch below: Across the National Hockey League, teams and fans dream of a new arena. Edmonton’s is a reality, but getting the more than $600-million project built took some backing and bankroll of the city. Kendra Slugoski reports.

(Source: City of Edmonton)



Shane Swanson
Crazy that taxpayer money used for such a building. An expensive subsidy for a bunch of minimum wage jobs. Should have had more backbone and told the Oilers to move. Why are the taxpayers paying for this?
UnlikeReply2Sep 9, 2016 7:08am
Julie Ali · 

Captured city council. Some citizens with more interest in hockey than the public interest. And although some of us protested, it was a done deal. It's the way DeMockracy works in Alberta. And maybe everywhere else. The rich folks get ahead and the poor get the what's left over from the subsidies to the elite.

http://www.metronews.ca/.../edmonton-urban-manor-gets...

He said Urban Manor is a “godsend” and feels like home to him after previously staying at the Herb Jamieson Centre.
Lebar said he’s been sleeping a lot better since getting new mattresses.
“It makes a huge difference in your day. Especially if you’re working,” he said.
Resident Charlie Manns said it’s stressful when things break down in the building and they don’t have the funds to replace them.
For him, the services the society provides are vital.
“If I wasn’t here I don’t think I’d be alive too long. Not out on the street,” Manns said.
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So why did the oil and gas industry get $235 million for their "loan" and $30 million from the feds so that the loan is interest free while the homeless get the pocket change that is left over?

Urban Manor Housing Society among facilities to benefit from $1.7M in provincial grants.
METRONEWS.CA

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http://www.metronews.ca/news/edmonton/2017/06/07/edmonton-urban-manor-gets-funds-for-new-beds.html


‘Such a stress reliever’: Home for men in need gets funds for essentials

Urban Manor Housing Society among facilities to benefit from $1.7M in provincial grants.

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Shawn Lebar, left, and Charlie Manns pose in front of the Urban Manor Housing Society.
KEVIN MAIMANN / METRO Order this photo
Shawn Lebar, left, and Charlie Manns pose in front of the Urban Manor Housing Society.
By: Kevin Maimann Metro Published on Wed Jun 07 2017
Residents of a McCauley housing facility for men struggling with addiction are sleeping soundly after getting new money from the province.
The Urban Manor Housing Society received just over $52,000 that has been used to buy a working dishwasher, fix a leaking roof, update the building’s fire alarms, install new lockers, and buy much-needed new mattresses for its 75 residents.
“Just getting what we have gotten to date, from this money, has been such a stress reliever. You have no idea,” said Urban Manor’s Executive Director Linda Noel.
“When our boys come downstairs in the morning and say what a great sleep they got because they’re on a new mattress, that really does your heart good.”
The money is part of a broad announcement by the province that will see $1.7 million go to homeless shelters for maintenance and upgrades that address fire, health and safety risks.
Urban Manor provides residents with three meals a day, weekly visits by nurses and pharmacists, and a safe space for drinking an allotted amount of alcohol provided they comply with the house rules.
After the dishwasher unexpectedly broke, staff, residents and volunteers were spending hours scrubbing dishes in the kitchen.
“It’s hard on the people who live here, it’s hard on the staff,” said resident Shawn Lebar. “It may seem like a small thing to other people, but a dishwasher means a lot.”
He said Urban Manor is a “godsend” and feels like home to him after previously staying at the Herb Jamieson Centre.
Lebar said he’s been sleeping a lot better since getting new mattresses.
“It makes a huge difference in your day. Especially if you’re working,” he said.
Resident Charlie Manns said it’s stressful when things break down in the building and they don’t have the funds to replace them.
For him, the services the society provides are vital.
“If I wasn’t here I don’t think I’d be alive too long. Not out on the street,” Manns said.
The provincial grant also included $342,000 for Hope Mission and $62,000 for Operation Friendship Seniors Society.

Boyle Street Community Services, meanwhile, got a $250,000 grant to build a business case for redevelopment by Dec. 31, 2018, and the city was given $250,000 to identify service gaps and explore an integrated community wellness approach by working with police and 11 community agencies.


$613.7 million for the Katz Arena.
$1.7 million for homeless shelters.
Yup. We've got our priorities correct in Alberta.
The elite first.
The poorest last.

When the deal for Rogers Place was signed several years ago, the city posted the all-in cost as $606.5 million. A recent update on the city's website pegged the price tag…
GLOBALNEWS.CA

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http://globalnews.ca/news/2762084/overall-cost-of-edmontons-downtown-arena-goes-up-7m-katz-to-foot-bill/


June 14, 2016 4:27 pm

Overall cost of Edmonton’s downtown arena goes up $7M; Katz to foot bill

By Emily Mertz and Vinesh Pratap Global News
Rogers Place continues to take shape in downtown Edmonton, Tuesday, July 28, 2015.
Rogers Place continues to take shape in downtown Edmonton, Tuesday, July 28, 2015.
Dean Twardzik, Global News
- A A +
When the deal for Rogers Place was signed several years ago, the city posted the all-in cost as $606.5 million. A recent update on the city’s website pegged the price tag at $613.7 million.
The city stresses the cost difference – $7.2 million – will not be paid for by taxpayers.

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It explained there were changes to the project’s scope: improvements to the Community Rink (being paid for by MacEwan University, which will be using the rink) and improved connections between the casino building and the hotel (being paid for by the Katz Group.)
Since the work is happening at the same time as the arena construction, the costs are being included in the overall price tag.
“Everyday citizens, they won’t see a difference,” Rick Daviss, executive director of the Downtown Arena Project, said. “The cost increases, yes. We are getting a better facility with a higher value, but that’s all being funded by MacEwan or by the Katz Group. And so the city contribution remains as it was.”
The downtown arena project still faces a $31.5-million funding gap, unrelated to these two improvements.
The city was hoping provincial grants would help pay for part of the arena and Community Rink costs, but the funds did not come through.
Council will vote to tap into the Community Revitalization Levy to make up the difference.
Rogers Place is scheduled to open Sept. 10 ahead of the 2016 NHL season.

The Edmonton Oilers will play their first game there on Monday, Sept. 26 against the Calgary Flames.

Julie Ali · 

In contrast to the major money spent on the useless Katz Arena we are now told that there will be $1.7 million go to the homeless. I guess the difference in the expenditures are due to the inability fo the homeless to get their voices heard. Very sad.

http://www.metronews.ca/.../edmonton-urban-manor-gets...
The money is part of a broad announcement by the province that will see $1.7 million go to homeless shelters for maintenance and upgrades that address fire, health and safety risks.
LikeReplyJust nowEdited
Susan Sharpe
Ask Mandel! He was the one praying the hardest for the vote FOR the area!!!
LikeReply1Jun 14, 2016 7:41pm
Glendon Ho
lol. still bitter I see.
LikeReplyJun 15, 2016 10:33am
Julie Ali · 

Glendon Ho I think she can express her comments and not be called bitter. I do believe our city council is captured as well and I am not bitter. I am realistic.
LikeReplyJust now
Last week, the provincial government announced $1.7 million in funding for infrastructure projects supporting homeless shelters. This much-needed funding will help take care of practicalities at shelters across our city, like fixing the leaking roof at Boyle Street's Urban Manor Housing Society, amongst other repairs and amenities.
These funds will make a significant difference for the folks who call these shelters (temporarily) home. This is very good news indeed!

Urban Manor Housing Society among facilities to benefit from $1.7M in provincial grants.
METRONEWS.CA
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Julie Ali Wonder how much money was spent on the Ice district and the Katz Arena in public funds? Let me go look. Hmm...seems like a lot more than we're spending on the homeless but then these are rich folks and not the poor right? http://globalnews.ca/.../overall-cost-of-edmontons.../ When the deal for Rogers Place was signed several years ago, the city posted the all-in cost as $606.5 million. A recent update on the city’s website pegged the price tag at $613.7 million.

The city stresses the cost difference – $7.2 million – will not be paid for by taxpayers The downtown arena project still faces a $31.5-million funding gap, unrelated to these two improvements.

The city was hoping provincial grants would help pay for part of the arena and Community Rink costs, but the funds did not come through.

Council will vote to tap into the Community Revitalization Levy to make up the difference.

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