Monday, June 12, 2017

--Lois Cookson’s 89-year-old stepfather was a patient at LHCC and she said that, “He was dying before our eyes in the Lacombe Hospital” with problems that included incorrect testing, filing of testing under the wrong patient’s name and providing the wrong antibiotic.--------Orr said his party’s concern is why it took the students to bring the issues forward. “This is not a new thing. Families and residents have tried to speak up, and often being rebuffed. Why did it take this long for this to come to light?”--------Linda Moore Martin, the dean of health sciences at Red Deer College, said it would not have been easy for the students to raise such an issue and is "immensely proud" of their actions. ---------


Unlike Mr. Noel Somerville I do not see any improvements in the continuing care system with the NDP folks. I mean the bed increases aren't enough are they if we have folks waiting longer for placement? Also what about looking at the auditing issues in the facilities? The NDP folks have failed at transparency and won't reveal to us the CCHSS or Quality audits like they do for the Accommodation audits which at least are up for a bit before they are yanked as if a permanent history of non-compliances might hurt the business interests of the continuing care industry.
It's ridiculous to see folks in the NDP camp like PIA butter up the NDP MLAs in this useless way. We should instead be kicking NDP rump as we will in the next election. This isn't enough. We want major changes and a complete overhaul of the punitive stance of the system. We want progress of the real rather than the fantasy sort.
LikeShow more reactions
Comment
Comments


Noel Sommerville is correct in saying that the government of Alberta has taken a lacklustre stance in terms of seniors' care in the continuing care system in Alberta. The reason for this sort of disinterest is money. Government does not want to spend money on seniors' care especially since there is no obligation to do this in the Canada Health Act. In other words, medical care is covered but other care of seniors and handicapped folks such as quality of life care and accommodation  in the continuing care sector is up to families to pay for --not the government which is not interested in increasing costs.  All government is willing to do is provide money to subsidize the building of some continuing care facilities by the private sector real estate developers which is a good deal for real estate developers and a bad situation for the most vulnerable citizens in my opinion.

I don't believe that the care of seniors is best served in the private sector but this is my opinion. Other folks may believe that the increasing costs of taking care of a burgeoning market of customers will prove to be too much for the rest of society. Funny how this is never a problem when we all enter the seniors' situation but up until then the costs of caring for seniors and the most vulnerable handicapped citizens is seen as an onerous burden that is not the responsibility of the state.

Most of the health care costs are paid for by the state of course-- but the residence costs must be covered by the residents and therefore the government figures out this is an accommodation problem and not a health care issue.

This is a false position to take. We're not simply finding placements for seniors and those folks with disabilities who need residential care--we're also providing health care and as such the government has a responsibility to provide health care in appropriate settings -whether this be in the private or public sector.

The concentration mindset of the government has been to provide public money to build the accommodations of the least cost--which are the supportive living sites. The emphasis on these sites means basically there are more profits for the private sector and less costs for government. But are the increasing numbers of complex care and dementia cases best served in SL-4 Dementia sites without 24/7 RN support? In my opinion, no.

But government has opted for cheapening out and less care for seniors as well as an artificial rationing of seniors' beds in long term care simply by not making any public long term care beds and waiting for the private sector to step up with more ASLI initiatives that don't seem to have met the need for long term care beds. So what is going on?

Here is Mr. Sommerville telling us the way government has decided to do continuing care to date:

http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/columnists/opinion-finally-some-progress-on-seniors-care

The only significant increase in seniors’ care infrastructure over those years has been in the number of supportive-living beds, which provide lower levels of care than long-term care facilities and can also download many costs onto patients and their families.
Many of these supportive-living beds have been contracted out to for-profit corporations by Alberta Health Services too. Research studies have shown that the need to generate a return for investors leads to lower staffing levels, less-qualified staff, lower hours of care per patient, and a general decline in the quality of care provided compared to that of publicly operated facilities.
****

Please note PIA is an organization that supports publicly funded stuff so of course they will cite information that supports their position that the private sector is not willing to provide quality care because their first loyalty is to the shareholders and themselves. This well maybe the case. But we also have public long term care facilities that are also not providing the care that is required by the standards of care as per the Lacombe facility revelations:


I am curious why the problems at this facility were ignored until a group of nursing students refused to let the non-compliances continue. What a shameful matter for AHS that it had to finally respond to auditing failures on its part by a group of kids.


MLA Ron Orr speaks out after three staff were put on leave for breaches
LACOMBEEXPRESS.COM

LikeShow more reactions
Comment
Comments

http://www.lacombeexpress.com/news/critics-call-for-quick-action-after-serious-concerns-raised-at-lacombe-hospital/

Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre

Critics call for quick action after serious concerns raised at Lacombe hospital

MLA Ron Orr speaks out after three staff were put on leave for breaches

  • Thu May 11th, 2017 8:00am

  • NEWS

  •  

BY ERIN FAWCETT

Lacombe Express

Wildrose Lacombe – Ponoka MLA Ron Orr is calling on the NDP governmentto take action after three staff on the long-term care unit at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre were put on leave following an investigation that saw serious breaches in terms of care.

“These are serious issues and as the person who delivered it to us felt, they were shocked and thought the public needed to know,” said Orr.

“Our objective is not to make things worse at the hospital or to try and blame anybody. We want to try and see this whole thing fixed and we want to see the hospital to be a safe place for residents and a happy place for family members to have their residents and quite frankly a safe and happy place for staff to work. I don’t think this is caused by staff directly. This is caused by the long-term and systemic issues of Alberta Health Services and particularly the funding that has been so well detailed for all of Central Alberta where we receive substantially less funding then other places.

“As a result, staff are short, equipment is short, maintenance issues are not dealt with, supplies are not provided and the staff are doing the best they can with a very, very difficult situation.

“It needs to come to light so Alberta Health Services can’t just whitewash it and make it all go away.”

He added the Auditor General report for both 2014 and again in 2016 reads,“Seniors in long-term care facilities: We recommend that the Department of Health clearly define, and separate the role and responsibilities from those of AHS in monitoring and managing long-term care service delivery.”

It also reads, “Improve public reporting on what results the provincial long-term care system is expected to achieve and whether it is achieving them.”

Orr added this has been a long-standing issue.

“Even the Auditor General has flagged it. It’s something that needs to happen,” he said. “If these things had been done, we may not be in the situation we are at the long-term care facility (in Lacombe).”

Leaked documents earlier this week show a system in flux at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre (LHCC) and brought to light serious concerns about the level of care provided at the facility.

The documents outline an investigation that was launched in April as a result of, “Serious concerns raised about care quality at the site” brought forward by Red Deer College practical nurse students who were completing their practicums at the facility in March.

Serious breaches that were found as a result of the investigation include expired aseptic sterile supplies like catheters; soiled linen and garbage overflowing into hallways; slings being used communally without a clear,consistent cleaning process; medication left unsecured, unlabeled,unattended; lack of proper training in medication management and assistance (for those managing medication); lack of proper training in dementia care (for those assisting clients with dementia) and lack of proper training in risk management, fall prevention, CPR, palliative/end-of-life care,safe lifts, restraints and bathing.

As the documents outline, a formal report is pending.

“There are serious failings at the LHCC that must be addressed in order for faith to be restored in our health care system,” said Orr. “Patients and their loved ones have seen inadequate levels of care that are simply unacceptable, and that must change. Wildrose will hold the NDP government to account to ensure that significant problems found in the initial investigation are fixed.”

Wildrose spoke to concerned residents in Lacombe about the findings of the initial investigation.

Lois Cookson’s 89-year-old stepfather was a patient at LHCC and she said that, “He was dying before our eyes in the Lacombe Hospital” with problems that included incorrect testing, filing of testing under the wrong patient’s name and providing the wrong antibiotic.

In a statement to the media, AHS said they have taken significant action to ensure safe, effective care continues to be provided to long term care residents at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre.

This follows a review at the long-term care centre by AHS, as well as an audit of continuing care health service and accommodation standards by both AHS and Alberta Health.

The review and audit also found areas where staff training was deficient including in the areas of wound care and management, infection prevention and control, restraint use and management, safe lifts and transfers,dementia care and palliative and end of life care.

AHS has developed an implementation plan to address all the recommendations, officials said.

“Our first concern is for the residents living in the Lacombe long-term care facility,” said Brenda Huband, vice-president and chief health operations officer for Central and Southern Alberta. “We take these concerns very seriously and we responded quickly with our investigation and audits with support from Alberta Health.”

She added actions taken at the site include thorough health assessments of all 75 residents; physiotherapy and falls risk assessments on all residents; a thorough cleaning of the site including resident care areas, medication rooms, medication carts and tub rooms, with support and guidance from infection prevention and control professionals; improved communication between caregivers and residents/families and between caregivers; the introduction of two-day education sessions for all long-term care staff to ensure they understand, principles of resident and family-centered care,health service and accommodation standards for continuing care and working with stakeholders to introduce a resident and family council that can meet regularly to ensure high quality care is maintained.

The AHS review of the site concluded last week and highlights the need to shift from a more traditional long-term care approach to a more resident and family-focused care model, officials have said.


AHS has met with residents, families, local stakeholders and community leaders to advise them of the investigation and to provide information on steps that had already been taken. Each resident’s primary care physician has also been involved.


Troubling that despite four years of non-compliances for accommodation reports no one had any AUDIT results to indicate non-compliances to the standards of care at this place before nursing students bring up these issues to the folks at AHS? Where are the AHS audits and the Alberta Health audits for this facility over the past few years to indicate to us that someone was in charge of checking the standards at this place? Or are CCHSS audits and quality audits only done when there is media attention and the Wildrose Party raising these issues in the legislature?
Very odd.
I seem to recall not too long ago that the NDP folks in the opposition were doing what the Wildrose Party folks are doing now which is holding the GOA accountable for unacceptable performance in the care of our seniors. Where are the NDP folks now? Are they missing in action?


Alberta Health Services has confirmed three staff members at Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre are now on leave. This, following an investigation in April into…
EDMONTON.CTVNEWS.CA

LikeShow more reactions
Comment

http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/documents-leaked-after-ahs-investigation-into-quality-of-care-at-lacombe-hospital-1.3410164


Documents leaked after AHS investigation into quality of care at Lacombe Hospital

AHS on investigation at Lacombe Hospital

















Taylor Oseen
Taylor Oseen , Reporter - CTV Red Deer Bureau

Published Thursday, May 11, 2017 5:27PM MDT
Alberta Health Services has confirmed three staff members at Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre are now on leave. This, following an investigation in April into concerns surrounding the quality of care at the hospital.
The nearly 40 page investigation report and audit was made public by the Wildrose Party earlier this week.
“We began this because an Alberta Health Services manager passed on to us a series of documents that indicate a number of standard breaches at the Lacombe hospital,” said Lacombe-Ponoka MLA Ron Orr.

PHOTOS

Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre
The document brings to light that not all staff at the Lacombe Hospital were trained in critical areas such as CPR, palliative and end of life care, safe lifts, transfers or use of restraints. "I think the situation is serious. The official that gave us the documents said they were shocking and felt that the public needed to know,” said Orr.
Other concerns range from expired aseptic sterile supplies like catheters, to medication being left unsecured, unlabeled and unattended.
The investigation into the quality of care and state of the hospital began after a group of Red Deer College nursing students - who were training there in March - brought their concerns forward.
Orr said his party’s concern is why it took the students to bring the issues forward. “This is not a new thing. Families and residents have tried to speak up, and often being rebuffed. Why did it take this long for this to come to light?”
Alberta Health Services says they responded quickly with their investigation and audit.
In a statement, Central Zone Chief Health Operations Officer Brenda Huband said “Our first concern is for the residents living in the Lacombe long-term care facility.”
In the release AHS says actions it plans on taking include: Thorough health assessments of all 75 residents; physiotherapy and falls risk assessments on all residents; a thorough cleaning of the site, with support and guidance from Infection Prevention and Control professionals, of all resident care areas, including medication rooms, medication carts, and tub rooms; improved communication between caregivers and residents/families, and between caregivers; the introduction of education sessions for all staff to ensure they understand health service and accommodation standards for continuing care; and working with stakeholders to introduce a resident and family council that can meet regularly to ensure high quality care is maintained.
The review was finished last week, and AHS says it highlights the need to shift to a more resident and family-focused care model.
“It is best practice in continuing care to develop care plans with input from residents, their families if they choose, and a multi-disciplinary care team,” said Huband
A final report is expected next week.

The Wildrose Party is asking the NDP government to ensure it’s made public.
****
What is troubling about this case is that a group of nursing students had to raise the problems of non-compliances which were not noted by either AHS or Alberta Health auditing teams. For surely this facility would have had CCHSS audits done on a regular basis? Or are audits only done when there is #MediaAttention and complaints that won't go away? Why were these problems missed by the auditing teams we pay for? Why are we not seeing penalties for ongoing non-compliances? Why do families raise issues that don't get any sort of response until it can no longer be avoided?

Three staff members have been placed on leave following an Alberta Health Services internal investigation into the quality of long-term care provided at the Lacombe…
RDNEWSNOW.COM

LikeShow more reactions
Comment


AHS investigation reveals serious long-term care problems at Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre

By Troy Gillard (Twitter: @Troy_Gillard)

May 10, 2017 - 12:53pmUpdated: May 10, 2017 - 5:10pm

rdnewsNOW file photo

Three staff members have been placed on leave following an Alberta Health Services internal investigation into the quality of long-term care provided at the Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre.

In a statement released late Tuesday, AHS confirmed the investigation was launched after concerns were raised in March by RDC nursing students completing their practicum at the facility.

A release from the Wildrose party earlier in the day said those concerns included expired catheters, soiled sheets and overflowing garbage, improper sharing of medication, lack of proper medication training and management, lack of dementia care training, and a lack of proper training for risk management.

Brenda Huband, Vice-President and Chief Health Operations Officer for AHS Central and Southern Alberta says actions have been taken to address the concerns.

“We take these concerns very seriously and we responded quickly with our investigation and audits with support from Alberta Health,” she said.

According to AHS, the list of actions being taken at the facility includes:

- Thorough health assessments of all 75 residents in long-term care;

- Physiotherapy and falls risk assessments on all residents;

- A thorough cleaning of the site, with support and guidance from Infection Prevention and Control professionals, of all resident care areas, including medication rooms, medication carts, and tub rooms;

- Improved communication between caregivers and residents/families, and between caregivers;

- The introduction of education sessions for all staff to ensure they understand health service and accommodation standards for continuing care;

- Working with stakeholders to introduce a resident and family council that can meet regularly to ensure high quality care is maintained;

- Three staff have been placed on leave.

AHS says its review, which concluded last week, highlights the need to shift to a more resident and family-focused care model.

“It is best practice in continuing care to develop care plans with input from residents, their families if they choose, and a multi-disciplinary care team,” says Huband. “Our care planning process should respect that this is their home and should take into account their desires about the care they want and need.”

Who should be held responsible when poor healthcare issues are discovered?

An AHS investigation discovered serious long-term care issues at Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre [STORY]

Hospital Administrators

Provincial Government

Front-line Staff

Total votes: 57

Thank you for voting.






It is curious why AHS needs to be training staff at our expense. Aren't staff supposed to be trained already for the work they are supposed to be doing? How come we are paying for the mentoring of staff by AHS? Why aren't there any penalties for poor performance? Why is it that we are supposed to accept poor performance, non-compliances and frank failures in the care of our family members while the chatter is always that the folks at AHS and Alberta Health take these matters seriously. Why-if the folks at AHS and Alberta Health take these matters so very seriously are there four years of non-compliances to the accommodation standards? Could it be that instead of taking these matters seriously the folks at AHS and Alberta Health simply turn a blind eye to these issues that families bring up until there is media attention. Is it #MediaAttention that gets the auditing teams to these non-compliant facilities?


Alberta Health Services has placed three staff members on administrative leave after discovering a long list of problems at the Lacombe Hospital and Care centre.
CBC.CA

LikeShow more reactions
Comment
Comments




Staff placed on leave after nursing students flag alarming problems at Lacombe Hospital

Using leaked audit documents, Opposition Wildrose describe conditions at the facility as 'appalling'

By Gareth Hampshire, CBC News Posted: May 10, 2017 1:32 PM MT Last Updated: May 11, 2017 6:49 PM MT

Alberta Health Services is investigating safety and sanitary issues and staff training at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre.

Alberta Health Services is investigating safety and sanitary issues and staff training at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre. (Google)

929 shares

 

 








Three staff members have been placed on leave at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre after a review uncovered safety and sanitary problems and inadequate staff training.    

Opposition Wildrose Leader Brian Jean described conditions at the facility as "appalling" during question period at the Alberta legislature on Tuesday.    

The problems only came to light after nursing students from Red Deer College raised alarms in March, during their practicum at the facility.    

"We are grateful that the students who were on the site did raise concerns and that AHS followed up immediately," said Health Minister Sarah Hoffman.

Leaked documents made public by the Wildrose show not all staff at the centre received training on infection control practices.

Training was also found to be deficient in the areas of wound care, dementia care and medication management.

Private client health information was left unattended in unsecured locations easily accessible to staff and families.

Opposition concerned about patient safety

Other problems outlined in the documents included expired sterile supplies, such as catheters, dirty linen and overflowing garbage found in the hospital's hallways.

Linda Moore Martin, the dean of health sciences at Red Deer College, said it would not have been easy for the students to raise such an issue and is "immensely proud" of their actions.

"I think the students coming forward with their concerns has made a huge difference for the residents and we are very pleased that Alberta Health Services has taken the concerns expressed by the students seriously," Moore Martin said.

Jean told the legislature the documents identified 80 problems at the centre, some of which he said jeopardized patient safety.

"Would the premier trust the level of care at this hospital to her own loved ones?" he asked in question period Tuesday.

Hoffman replied, and insisted she would feel confident if her family members were being cared for at the hospital. She said solutions to the problems have since been put in place.

Alberta Health Services is investigating the issue and is now taking steps it said will ensure that patients get safe and effective care.

AHS says staff given more training

In a written statement, AHS said all 75 residents in the long-term care centre have had new health assessments and the centre has been thoroughly cleaned.

Education sessions are also being provided to staff.

The health authority said it has met with residents and their families to explain the situation.

An additional investigation is being conducted by the Protection for Persons in Care unit of Alberta Health.

The group responds to reports of potential abuse of patients in hospitals or nursing homes, in addition to examining accommodation standards.

That investigation was launched in March after Alberta Health was notified about the problems.


Alberta Health Services would not say what jobs were performed by staff placed on administrative leave, but said they'll remain on leave pending the outcome of the investigations underway.


******************************************************



This is an AHS run facility with four years of accommodation audits being non-compliant. So really PIA should not just single out the private sector continuing care facilities as being the only ones that are non-compliant; it is clear from this account that there are problems in publicly run facilities as well. What sort of problems were being brought forwards by families and no one was paying attention until the  nursing students took action?
http://www.wildrose.ca/leaked_documents_highlight_serious_concerns_with_level_of_care_at_lacombe_hospital_and_care_centre_wildrose
May 09, 2017

Leaked documents highlight serious concerns with level of care at Lacombe Hospital and care centre: Wildrose

Leaked documents show a system in flux at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre (LHCC) and bring to light serious concerns about the level of care provided at the facility, the Wildrose Official Opposition said today.
The documents outline an investigation that was launched in April 2017 as a result of “serious concerns raised about care quality at the site” brought forward by Red Deer College practical nurse students who were completing their practicums at the facility.

Serious breaches that were found as a result of the investigation include:
  • expired aseptic sterile supplies like catheters;
  • soiled linen and garbage overflowing into hallways;
  • slings being used communally without a clear, consistent cleaning process;
  • medication left unsecured, unlabeled, unattended;
  • lack of proper training in medication management and assistance (for those managing medication);
  • lack of proper training in dementia care (for those assisting clients with dementia); and
  • lack of proper training in risk management, fall prevention, CPR, palliative/end-of-life care, safe lifts, restraints, and bathing.
“The findings of this investigation are incredibly concerning, and show that Albertans in the Lacombe area are not receiving the care they deserve, Wildrose Leader Brian Jean said. “If it hadn’t been for the nursing students who were adamant about bringing their concerns forward, these unacceptable standards could have persisted.”

As the documents outline, a formal report is pending. Wildrose is calling on the NDP government to ensure that report is made public to ensure transparency and accountability.

“There are serious failings at the LHCC that must be addressed in order for faith to be restored in our health care system,” Wildrose Lacombe – Ponoka MLA Ron Orr said. “Patients and their loved ones have seen inadequate levels of care that are simply unacceptable, and that must change. Wildrose will hold the NDP government to account to ensure that significant problems found in the initial investigation are fixed.”

Wildrose spoke to concerned residents in Lacombe about the findings of the initial investigation. Lois Cookson’s 89 year old stepfather was a patient at LHCC and said that “he was dying before our eyes in the Lacombe Hospital” with problems that included incorrect testing, filing of testing under the wrong patient’s name, and providing the wrong antibiotic.

*****

Where is the follow up report on the audit of this facility?


An Alberta Health Services inspection has uncovered serious health and safety issues at a long-term care facility in Lacombe, Alta.
GLOBALNEWS.CA

LikeShow more reactions
Comment

http://globalnews.ca/news/3441589/inspection-uncovers-unsanitary-conditions-deficient-staff-training-at-central-alberta-long-term-care-facility/



HEALTH
May 10, 2017 1:32 pm

Inspection uncovers unsanitary conditions, deficient staff training at central Alberta long-term care facility

By Caley RamsayOnline Journalist Global News
An Alberta Health Services sign in front of a Calgary hospital.
An Alberta Health Services sign in front of a Calgary hospital.
File/Global News
- A A +
An Alberta Health Services inspection has uncovered serious health and safety issues at a long-term care facility in Lacombe, Alta.
AHS said it has taken “significant action” to improve the conditions at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre after an internal review uncovered deficient staff training and unsanitary conditions at the health-care facility.

RELATED

The review and audit began in April 2017 after “serious concerns” about the quality of care at the Lacombe facility were raised by Red Deer College practical nurse students completing their practicums at the health-care centre.
The inspection found several issues, including food past its best before date, dirty products stored with sterile supplies and used razors left unattended and unsecured.
Several staff training issues were also discovered in the areas of wound care and management, infection prevention and control, restraint use and management, safe lifts and transfers, dementia care, and palliative and end-of-life care.
“Our first concern is for the residents living in the Lacombe long-term care facility,” said Brenda Huband, vice-president and chief health operations officer with AHS.
“We take these concerns very seriously and we responded quickly with our investigation and audits with support from Alberta Health.”
All 75 residents of the care centre were re-assessed by home-care nurses, according to AHS. Their families were also notified of the inspection.
The statement from AHS was released after the Wildrose party leaked the inspection documents on Tuesday.
Wildrose Lacombe-Ponoka MLA Ron Orr said the “serious failings” must be addressed “in order for faith to be restored in our health-care system.”
“Patients and their loved ones have seen inadequate levels of care that are simply unacceptable, and that must change,” Orr said.
“Wildrose will hold the NDP government to account to ensure that significant problems found in the initial investigation are fixed.”
AHS said three staff members have been placed on leave following the inspection.
A plan has been put in place to bring the care level back up to where it should be. The facility has been thoroughly cleaned and education sessions will be introduced for all staff to ensure they understand the standards for continuing care, AHS said.
“It is best practice in continuing care to develop care plans with input from residents, their families if they choose, and a multi-disciplinary care team,” Huband said. “Our care planning process should respect that this is their home and should take into account their desires about the care they want and need.”
Further issues discovered at the facility included:
  • Antibiotic usage and infection rates were heavily prevalent
  • Care plans did not consistently reflect the findings of standardized assessments used to determine the client’s health care needs
  • Some charts were missing care plans
  • Post-fall assessments were not completes as per best practice
  • Dietary assessments were not implemented or documented on care plans
  • Vital signs monitoring was inconstantly completed
  • Wound care interventions were not implemented and/or not accurately documented
  • Things like toileting plans, wake-up and rest schedules, intake and output diaries were not being completed
  • Health-care providers did not have access and/or a clear understanding of the most up-to-date policies and procedures
  • Not all staff working with clients with dementia were trained in care of clients with dementia
  • Not all health-care providers received training in risk management, fall prevention, CPR, palliative and end-of-life care, restraint use and safe bath and shower water temperature methods
  • Documentation of immunizations to prevent the spread of infectious agents was inconsistently documented
  • Open dressing supplies were found in clean supply area
  • Safe storage of medication was not consistently implemented
  • Eye wash stations were expired
  • Medication was found to be unsecured


 

Julie Ali · 

It seems curious to me that the non-compliances were tolerated for so many years. What is the point of the standards of care if no one is doing anything to audit, follow up and ensure that facilities are compliant? Is this a situation like the one present with big oil where we have best in the world regulations but no sort of real oversight or penalties by the energy regulator? Is it all about image and no sort of transparency or accountability? If this is the case why even bother to do any audits? We also only get the accommodation audits; the government of Alberta may provide the CCHSS audits on FOIP request but I still haven't got the Quality Reviews by AHS and Alberta Health that were done on a facility in 2014 that I requested. So in my opinion this situation is hopeless. We only get real oversight when the media is motivated to report; otherwise non-compliances are noted and nothing is done as in this case. Just look at the history of non-compliances with reference to the accommodation standards for this facility and you have to see that the government of Alberta isn't interested in the oversight of our most vulnerable citizens until it is embarrassed into doing it's job.

http://standardsandlicensing.alberta.ca/detail_page.html...
LACOMBE HOSPITAL AND CARE CENTRE
Add to Comparison Report
Accommodation Details

For access to this accommodation, individuals must be assessed and placed by Alberta Health Services. For more information please call Health Link Alberta Toll Free at 1-866-408-5465 or visit http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.

Units: 75
Accommodation Type: Long Term Care Accommodation
Operator: ALBERTA HEALTH SERVICES
Government Funding: Health
Contact Information

Accommodation: LACOMBE HOSPITAL AND CARE CENTRE
Address:
5430 47 Avenue
LACOMBE, Alberta
T4L 1G8
Phone: (403) 786-4944
Fax: N/A

Map data ©2017 Google
Terms of Use
Report a map error

Map
Satellite
Monitoring Information

Last Visit Date: April 30, 2017
Last Visit Type: Follow-Up Visit
Original Issue Date: July 28, 2009
Certificate Issue Date: September 23, 2016
Certificate Expiry Date: July 31, 2017
Certificate Type: Full
Inspection Reports

Inspectors regularly visit supportive living and long-term care accommodations to provide information on the accommodation standards, monitor to standards, make recommendations for licensing and investigate complaints. Below is more detailed information about the accommodation's compliance information.

Please see the list of site visits below for specific information related to visits since April 1, 2013.

Site Visits

Visit Date Visit Type Visit Results Current Status
2017/04/30
Follow-Up Visit Non-Compliant Non-Compliant
2017/04/24
Inspection Visit Non-Compliant Non-Compliant
2016/09/23
Follow-Up Visit Compliant Compliant
2016/07/12
Inspection Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2015/10/23
Follow-Up Visit Compliant Compliant
2015/09/24
Follow-Up Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2015/07/15
Inspection Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2015/05/06
Follow-Up Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2014/09/23
Follow-Up Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2014/08/14
Follow-Up Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2014/07/10
Inspection Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2013/08/28
Follow-Up Visit Non-Compliant Compliant
2013/07/24
Inspection Visit Non-Compliant Compliant

Site Visit Details
Lindsay Foster
The same problems were present when the conservatives were in power and the same will be present when a new government takes over...
Michelle Hodgins Fleury
It's because AHS has been cutting resident care minutes at long term care facilities for years. The staffing levels are down right disgusting. The residents aren't treated as human beings, they are treated like animals.
I haven't worked long term care in Alberta since 2013. It was bad then and I have been told by my old co-workers that it has only gotten worse in the last 4 years. Staff aren't educated properly. Many with a conscience have chosen to work elsewhere because they can't stand to see what's been going on. They report it and nothing gets done. Staff don't have time to properly document at the end of their shifts so important things are being missed.
The whole system needs to be overhauled and the management making the decisions need to be reminded that they are caring for our most vulnerable that deserve to be respected and cared for in humane conditions. Not like they are on an assembly line.
LikeReply2May 11, 2017 9:05am
Stephanie Cavanagh · 

You nailed it!!
LikeReplyMay 11, 2017 10:11am
Ruth Smith
maybe someone should check out just what our illustrious Health Boards are doing. If we were to dissolve them, then maybe the health care people could do their job effectively. Better still all of them should try a month or two working in the front line with the fine gig they have set it up. i am sure their offices are clean. Thanks for clearing this up Wildrose, with the leak.
Jessica P · 

The most vulnerable people, left in their own filth, unable to help themselves. What a heartbreaking situation. Maybe instead of the MLAs getting a pay raise, that money should go to caring for the elderly.
UnlikeReply4May 10, 2017 5:49pm
JoAnne Reynolds Golden
and maybe someone shoud check out Ponoka Hospital 
UnlikeReply1May 10, 2017 7:59pm
Julie Ali · 

JoAnne Reynolds Golden Problems seem to be endemic. Families need to raise these issues with the facilities; when ignored they should go to the media. The citizens in care do not have a voice in our society. We -the families-need to give them a voice.
LikeReplyJust now




What did AHS do when they were given the complaints?  Well they changed the leadership as noted here:
http://www.wildrosecaucus.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/DOC-003-002.pdf
and they did a CCHSS audit as noted here:

http://www.wildrosecaucus.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Doc1RDCTD-2.pdf

They also reassured the public with the sort of media chatter we are all familiar with here:

https://www.lacombeonline.com/local/ahs-comments-on-report-of-care-concerns-at-lacombe-hospital


AHS Comments on Report of Care Concerns at Lacombe Hospital


Category: Local News
Published: Wednesday, 10 May 2017 15:45
Written by Jordan Davidson
Alberta Health Services has responded to a report released by the Wildrose party on Tuesday, detailing some serious concerns with the level of care in the long term care unit at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre.
AHS did confirm that there was an investigation launched last month regarding the concerns, and they also confirmed that those concerns are mostly accurate, clarifying the issues are based entirely in the long term care unit, and not the Lacombe Hospital as a whole.
So far three staff members have been placed on leave according to AHS Vice President and Chief Health Operations Officer for Central and Southern Alberta Brenda Huband.
"Those staff members may have had some role in some of the concerns, so what we wanted to do was to be able to both protect them and ensure we were able to have a robust investigation, and once we have all of the results of that we will be meeting with those three staff members".
First and Foremost, Huband says their concerns and actions centered on the residents living in the facility.
"We have done health assessments on all 75 residents to ensure there are no outstanding health concerns.  Those assessments would have also included physiotherapy and a falls risk assessment just to make sure that everyone is safe and able to be up on their own or do they need a walker or some other kind of device to help them, so it's just again a part of an assessment".
A thorough cleaning was also done at the site with support from infection prevention control professionals.
Measures continue at the site to educate staff, and also address any concerns the patients and their families may have according to Huband.
"The first things that we did were to make sure we had leadership at the site, because there has been some vacancies there, so we ensured there was leaders there. We had investigation teams that were in very very soon after the concerns were addressed to us, and we are now moving on to education with our teams, and really creating a foundation of how to move forward more into resident and family focused care."
The concerns, which included lack of proper training in a number of areas, and pointing to uncleanliness, and medication being left unsecured, unlabelled and unattended, were originally brought to AHS's attention by nurse practicum students from Red Deer College, who were completing practicums at Lacombe Hospital in the long term care unit.
There is still a lot of positive support for Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre, but Huband says these concerns are troubling, and they have to be raised and addressed in order to move forward.
"This is a site that has had some challenges, but they do many many things very well. What we want to do is create a foundation to go forward on where that excellent care continues. But there have been concerns raised which we have to address. And that's part of the whole goal, is to keep moving forward, but make sure we have a strong underpinning so all of that strong care can continue."
You can view the concerns addressed by the Wildrose Party here.

Lacombe-Ponoka MLA Ron Orr presented the findings and questioned Health Minister Sarah Hoffman in the legislature on Tuesday, watch here.
https://www.facebook.com/RonOrrAB/

In response to concerns about the series of questions and news release on the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre that my office has heard over the last few days, I would like to affirm my commitment to supporting our front line workers, including nurses. I have not intended to hurt, offend, or take away from the endless hours of hard work that our front line workers put in.
The basis of these questions and news release were based on AHS documents, including an AHS Audit Action Plan that the public deserves to know about. I stand by the releasing of this document and my goal is to see the issues resolved for the betterment of our community and for the front line workers themselves.
To be clear the facility name is the Lacombe Hospital and Long Term Care Center, but the Audit is of the Long Term Care Centre.
The Auditor General report for both 2014 and again in 2016 (p117) says re: “Seniors in long-term care facilities: We recommend that the Department of Health: -Clearly define, and separate the role and responsibilities from those of AHS in monitoring and managing long-term care service delivery.” If this separation had been done, the problem at hand may not have happened. Staff should be asking the Department and AHS why this recommendation of the AG has not been followed.
Comments
Julie Ali Thank you for providing the CCHSS audit that shows that many non-compliances were present at this facility for no good reason that I can determine. Why did AHS and Alberta Health only take action when nursing students complained? Where were they when families complained? Missing in action?

ReplyJust now


At AHS’s Lacombe long term care centre families spoke up about elder abuse, but issues persisted until nursing students in practicum reported back to their superior. Why were families rebuffed, and why did it take so long for an investigation to be launched?



-4:08

2.6K Views

Like
Comment
Comments
Terry Jones Flewelling Why didn't they follow up years ago and to date where there have been numerous complaints?

Reply
5
May 10 at 10:58am
Janice Thacker-Worobetz Wow you just put Lacombe Hospital through the mud. This has to do with the Long Term Care Centre and not Lacombe Hospital. At least the Edmonton Sun got it right. I hope Wildrose changes this promptly and not wait on this on saying it is the Long Term Care Facility and not Lacombe Hospital.

Reply
5
May 10 at 11:18am
Ron Orr MLA Thanks Janice. Yes, it is the long term care centre, a wing of the Lacombe Hospital. Apologies if that wasn't 100% clear here.
Janice Thacker-Worobetz Thank you. Can you make sure this is clear by tweets, facebook and whatever else. I don't tweet, otherwise I would. Thanks for the response.

Reply
2
May 10 at 11:29am
Benjamin David Darnell Repeatedly you specifically mentioned Lacombe Hospital in your speech. Why did you not clarify or break it down to just Long Term Care? The private facilities around Lacombe should be looked into as well.

Reply
4
May 10 at 11:13pmEdited
Nicole Glimm As an employee at Lacombe Hospital I find it infuriating that you have drug the entire hospital through the mud and not the specific area that is under the current investigation.

Reply
4
May 10 at 12:26pm
Amy Traynor I feel like the post they made on their page was intentionally vague to spark outrage. Wildrose has never been keen on facts 😜

Reply
3
May 10 at 12:48pm
Marilyn Rich Keep us updated Ron......have any charges been laid yet!
Janet Orr The first line of of the post clarifies the Long term care facility - not the hospital
Janice Thacker-Worobetz Yes but unfortunately the main title spells out Lacombe Hospital first and the tweet at Team Wildrose states Lacombe hospital. It would be nice if they would change this. When you see this you automatically think it is the hospital too. Would be nice if they would tweet and spell out on other social media it is not the hospital and a mistake was made on how it was worded. But the damage has been done now.

Reply
2
May 10 at 2:17pm
Janet Orr I don't know bout twitter but this post is clear
Janice Thacker-Worobetz I guess the post was changed but I am still seeing main title saying Lacombe Hospital and care centre. If this was changed, thank you. But like I said the damage has been done and too bad he kept saying in Question Period it was Lacombe Hospital and not clarifing it further that it was long term care. I hope he makes an announcement of some kind he made a mistake by saying the hospital.

Reply
1
May 10 at 2:39pm
Marcy Klassen Being a previous employee of this facility, and being fired from management for not attending round six of modifiers duties, waiting a knee replacement. I know it is not the lowest on the totem pole workers, it was the managegement, health and safety, union and human resources that watch this happen and did nothing, or contributed in someway. It is sick that our seniors are forgotten and suffers, they were the founders of this country, if not for them we would not have any of this, our seniors need to be respected with the utmost care. It's all about the mighty dollar and prestige, we have forgotten our seniors. And it doesn't just happen here. Let's put more money into caring for our senoirs, the founders of this great country, Canada.
Marcy Klassen As I read my post it really sickens me, I remember when I worked there we would go short handed all the time and send hundreds of letters to the union, and management knew also. I feel so sorry for people I work with, and gossip in this town, and the senoirs who have suffered, what a uncompasstionate place we live in.

Like
Reply
1
May 10 at 4:19pm
Edith Williams I am so glad this is being addressed .

Reply
2
May 10 at 4:20pm
Mike Kozak Did the Union of Provincial Employees (Nurses), follow up with any complaints made their own members?
Marcy Klassen They are all buddies with the managers, human resources, and health and safety, they all work together, and wcb. The system is kurupt.
Mike Kozak Marcy Klassen like a lot of Unions
Jennifer Dunham We all saw the long term patients hanging out in the lobby, no one seemed to know or understand where they were or care.
Valerie Marina This is totally unacceptable! Why?
Julie Ali The concerns of families are not addressed or simply addressed poorly. The system is not interested in complaints. If families go public with complaints they face retribution which includes banning, evictions and lawsuits. It is difficult to persist with complaints and even with a Protection for Persons in Care complaint very little is done in my opinion. The government of Alberta fails our seniors and only when media attention brings the problems to the public is anything done. It's troubling but until families are willing to go to the media about each and every non-compliant facility in Alberta we will continue to have these problems tolerated by the GOA and the opposition parties will have to keep bringing up these issues in the legislature.

Reply4 mins
Julie Ali Families are not the only ones facing retribution; recently the entire staff at the Points West facility at Cold Lake were terminated. Their case seems to be preferential; Points West staff at Vegreville were not terminated so why were these workers targeted? Until we have open discourse on the problems in the continuing care system we are in a perennial loop of tolerated non-compliances, audits that don't solve the problems present and complaints that do not end the problems. What is needed is for the GOA to ensure reasonable staff:resident ratios are present, that staff get the training required, that staff get supports from an integrated care team containing specialists and that there are reasonable efforts made to provide supports and services for an increasingly complex resident mix. Some of these folks are very sick and yet aren't (in my opinion) getting the integrated care plans they need to meet their needs and have a quality of life that is reasonable. It's very sad. Hopefully families and staff will continue to activate themselves because the seniors in care have no voice in our society.

ReplyJust now


The problems at the Lacombe long term care facility appear to be long standing if we consider the accommodation reports for the past few years:

http://standardsandlicensing.alberta.ca/detail_page.html?ID=1128

LACOMBE HOSPITAL AND CARE CENTRE

Accommodation Details

For access to this accommodation, individuals must be assessed and placed by Alberta Health Services. For more information please call Health Link Alberta Toll Free at 1-866-408-5465 or visit http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/.
Units:75
Accommodation Type:Long Term Care Accommodation
Operator:ALBERTA HEALTH SERVICES
Government Funding:Health

Contact Information

Accommodation:LACOMBE HOSPITAL AND CARE CENTRE
Address:5430 47 AvenueLACOMBE, AlbertaT4L 1G8
Phone:(403) 786-4944 
Fax:N/A
Map data ©2017 Google
Map
Satellite

Monitoring Information


Last Visit Date:May 30, 2017
Last Visit Type:Follow-Up Visit
Original Issue Date:July 28, 2009
Certificate Issue Date:September 23, 2016
Certificate Expiry Date:July 31, 2017
Certificate Type:Full

Inspection Reports


Inspectors regularly visit supportive living and long-term care accommodations to provide information on the accommodation standards, monitor to standards, make recommendations for licensing and investigate complaints. Below is more detailed information about the accommodation's compliance information.
Please see the list of site visits below for specific information related to visits since April 1, 2013.

Site Visits


Visit DateVisit TypeVisit ResultsCurrent Status
2017/05/30 Non-CompliantNon-Compliant
2017/05/16 Non-CompliantNon-Compliant
2017/04/30 Non-CompliantNon-Compliant
2017/04/24 Non-CompliantNon-Compliant
2016/09/23 CompliantCompliant
2016/07/12 Non-CompliantCompliant
2015/10/23 CompliantCompliant
2015/09/24 Non-CompliantCompliant
2015/07/15 Non-CompliantCompliant
2015/05/06 Non-CompliantCompliant
2014/09/23 Non-CompliantCompliant
2014/08/14 Non-CompliantCompliant
2014/07/10 Non-CompliantCompliant
2013/08/28 Non-CompliantCompliant
2013/07/24 Non-CompliantCompliant
Based on just the cursory review of the accommodation reports this indicates a facility where non-compliances were regular and accepted by the system. So why did the system fail in this case? I'd say because non-compliances are tolerated by the GOA and the health authorities.

And for all the praise by PIA for the NDP folks and their increased numbers of beds, it doesn't seem to have altered wait times for placement has it?

http://www.wildrosecaucus.ca/continuing-care-placement-for-seniors-sputters-under-the-ndp-wildrose/


 

APRIL 20, 2017

Continuing care placement for seniors continues to fall under the NDP: Wildrose

A new report from AHS outlines how Alberta seniors are facing long waits to find continuing care placement under the NDP government, the Wildrose Official Opposition said today.

According to the AHS Third Quarter Performance Report, Alberta seniors have only a 56 per cent chance of finding continuing care placement within 30 days.

Wildrose Shadow Minister for Seniors and Mental Health Mark Smith said he was particularly troubled by the fact that in southern Alberta only 48 per cent of seniors are placed within 30 days. Even more troubling, senior officials called this number “stable” in the report’s summary.

“48 per cent placement within a month certainly suggests failure,” Smith said. “The government needs to take accountability for the fact that even with the announced increase in continuing care beds, wait times are getting worse under its watch and this is unacceptable.”

Smith said he’s been told by former AHS officials that the government is pulling funding for self-managed care. Self-managed care funding allows greater flexibility in meeting individuals’ needs, and provides much more cost-effective options for long term care.

“This does not make sense. At the same time it’s failing on wait times, the government is doubly hurting seniors by pulling money away from self-managed care. We know that self-managed care provides improved options for quality of life and is proven to be cost-effective,” Smith said. “Our seniors – the men and women who built this province – deserve better.”


**** 


So really isn't this praise misplaced?
What has really changed in Alberta with the hiring of the NDP folks? Not much.

The folks at PIA would be better employed by engaging with the Hoffman and crew and demanding better results than this.
We're not here to praise as citizens. We're here to ensure we get value for our money and unlike the folks at PIA I see no value for the money spent on the NDP MLAs to date.
Very discouraging.

Unlike Mr. Sommervile, who is a nice man and a tireless advocate for seniors--I see no progress in senors's care but a whole pile of the same failures that the PCs were so good at.



While I greatly respect Mr. Noel Somerville for his tireless work in PIA and as a seniors' advocate I do not agree with him that there is some progress in seniors' care. The PCs were pretty poor with reference to seniors' issues and it's hard to beat their record of poor performance but in my opinion, the NDP folks are approximating their lack of performance. Heck they may be even doing a worse job while telling us that they are doing better by providing more beds. The number of beds isn't enough and we don't have enough long term care beds. We are still privatizing the system and we don't have the cost benefit data to justify this matter. We're providing public dollars not only in the form of ASLI grants to the private sector (both for profit and not for profit businesses) but we are also providing money in the form of AHS staff at some of these facilities, money for renovations and money for equipment. Heck I am curious just how much extra supports we are providing to the continuing care industry that we don't get to see because such information is considered "proprietary". I would like to see all the costs associated with public and private provision of continuing care provided to us so that we can determine the cost benefits of both systems. Then I'd like to see us using the system that provides quality care to seniors rather than non-compliant care that is increasingly being featured in the news so that these non-compliances can be mentored back to compliance.
So odd.
The Red Deer nursing students were brave to come forward with their concerns because the system doesn't look too kindly on truth tellers especially if they are to employ said truth tellers. As their instructor says it--it could not have been easy. Nor is it easy for families but really who listens to us?
Not only is there no change in the continuing care system with the NDP folks we aren't seeing progress in terms of placements of citizens. Seniors are still having difficulty accessing a placement and why if we are supposedly making more placements with the NDP folks? I guess there is a backlog and we're not going to ever catch up. Meanwhile to exacerbate the shortage the NDP folks are going to remove the option of self managed care so that I guess the backlog increases.
So where are we in this mess? We still get audits and accommodation reports by AHS and Alberta Health that do not find the non-compliances that nursing students and families can spot. We still get no information on quality audits or CCHSS audits until the opposition party gives this information to us. We still get folks waiting for placement into the continuing care system because ... because of what? Well because no one in government cares about this business. We're stuck with the usual stasis of the GOA that is MIA (missing in action) when families find problems and only takes these problems seriously when #MediaAttention arrives to wake them all up. It's mind boggling. Really Mr. Somerville, don't you think you should go back and rewrite this opinion piece?


The 2017 Alberta budget produced some encouraging news on seniors’ care after the steady decline that has occurred in this province over the past 25 years. Since the early 1990s, the number of long…
EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM

LikeShow more reactions
Comment



 http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/columnists/opinion-finally-some-progress-on-seniors-care

Opinion: Finally, some progress on seniors' care

Published on: May 18, 2017 | Last Updated: May 18, 2017 6:00 AM MDT
Health Minister Sarah Hoffman (centre) announced 99 new beds will be added in an expansion of Villa Marguerite, a supportive living facility in west Edmonton, on August 24, 2016.
Health Minister Sarah Hoffman (centre) announced 99 new beds will be added in an expansion of Villa Marguerite, a supportive living facility in west Edmonton, on August 24, 2016. EDMONTON
The 2017 Alberta budget produced some encouraging news on seniors’ care after the steady decline that has occurred in this province over the past 25 years.
Since the early 1990s, the number of long-term care beds in this province has remained virtually unchanged, despite a 67-per-cent increase in Alberta’s population and an even larger increase in the percentage of Albertans who are seniors.
That 25-year period also saw a massive reduction in the number of acute-care hospital beds, no new auxiliary hospitals, and a steady decline in the availability of home care.
The only significant increase in seniors’ care infrastructure over those years has been in the number of supportive-living beds, which provide lower levels of care than long-term care facilities and can also download many costs onto patients and their families.
Many of these supportive-living beds have been contracted out to for-profit corporations by Alberta Health Services too. Research studies have shown that the need to generate a return for investors leads to lower staffing levels, less-qualified staff, lower hours of care per patient, and a general decline in the quality of care provided compared to that of publicly operated facilities.
The governing party’s election platform included a promise to end the previous governments’ experiments with privatization. Those experiments followed the agenda of corporations, many of them multi-nationals that eyed Alberta seniors as a business opportunity.
The problem is that every dollar returned to shareholders is a dollar not spent on care. A shift away from that direction and toward public ownership in all aspects of our seniors’ care system would put the public interest ahead of shareholder profit.
Thus, seniors are very encouraged by the recent provincial budget announcement of 345 new public long-term care beds (200 in Calgary and 145 in Edmonton), apparently the first step of a plan to build 1,000 new continuing-care beds. The other 655 beds may be the lower level of care – supportive living. We also learned of an additional $200 million for home care.
These 345 new long-term care beds are a step toward meeting what the government concedes is a deficit of about 4,000 long-term care spaces. Much more will need to be done to meet the significant shortage. The new beds, nonetheless, are the first significant improvement in long-term care we have seen in decades. This is especially true with the government’s commitment that the 345 beds will be publicly operated, meaning higher-quality care.
The additional $200 million for home care, bringing the total annual expenditure on home care to $2 billion per year, is also very encouraging. The money comes as Alberta receives new federal funding from a bilateral agreement on health care between the province and the federal government.
However, we have been given no indication of how the additional home-care funding will be allocated. The provincial government should use this new funding to follow through on its election commitment to phase in a new model for expanded public home care, rather than continuing the use of private, for-profit corporations to provide home care services to Albertans.
This would ensure the money is fully focused on care for Albertans, rather than on profits for corporate shareholders.
Much remains to be done to improve seniors’ care in Alberta: expanded pharmaceutical coverage; improved monitoring of residential care; and an end to the downloading of care costs to seniors and their families.
However, the progress made in the recent provincial budget is the most significant we have seen in a long time. Seniors’ organizations across Alberta applaud that progress and are doing everything we can to ensure it continues and expands to other areas.

Noel Somerville is chair of the Seniors Task Force at Public Interest Alberta.
Julie Ali · 

Troubling to see that PIA is promoting the NDP folks in terms of their poor record of performance in the continuing care sector. I see no change in the performance of the NDP folks from that of the PCs before them.

1) ASLI grants were provided to private corporations that are subsidized by taxpayer dollars from the construction of facilities (real estate holdings), through operations in some cases, and to the renovation of said properties. I can't see the value of putting public dollars into private businesses especially when these businesses are not operating in a free market where competition would drive out the poor performers. Nope. We have private businesses with cash infusion from us getting a captive customer market streamed to them in endless numbers. We have poor oversight, auditing, discliplining and maintenance of the levels of care; no staff:resident ratios determined in Alberta plus we have no public revelations of the CCHSS audits which would tell us about non-compliances at these facilities.
2) The numbers of long term beds are insignificant. We have long term care patients being downgraded to SL4 and SL4-dementia beds which do not require RNs. This is a cheapening out of the care provided and does not meet the needs of complex care patients who are downgraded to these facilities. Now, long term care has become a palliative sector in my opinion.
3) Despite boasts of Patient Care Based Funding meeting the increasingly multiple and complex needs of patients (called residents in the system) we don't have any sort of hard numbers that I can determine to see how much money goes to patient care in the private facilities. Why not? I was told this was proprietary information. This is ridiculous. We should know the amount of cash being spent on patient care because this is an accountability matter and if these numbers are know we should be asking government why. How much money is spent on staff? How much profit is being made? And could this profit be better spent on patient care in a public facility?
4) We are interested not on in the numbers of beds but also in the quality of care of patients (residents). These are sick people who we are told are not really patients but have care concerns warranting facility servicing. In my mind this is nonsense. These folks are patients. We should provide them with staff who are trained to deal with complex medical needs. We need integrated care teams. We need supports from psychiatrists, psychologists and mental health workers. We need OT and Physiotherapy on site. We need recreational aides. There is no reason why we should have sterile institutions when we can do much better. These folks are human beings. Some of them cannot speak for themselves and all of them are vulnerable.

PIA would be better engaged in speaking for seniors and handicapped folks in the continuing care system in a more assertive fashion than this. For example PIA could point out that the new Seniors Advocate is pretty powerless and can't help individuals. PIA could point out that the Trespass to Premises legislation needs amendment to provide access to justice for advocates who are banned. PIA could ask for anti-SLAPP legislation as well as whistleblower protection for citizens who point out the non-compliances at facilities. PIA --was an effective advocacy group until recently. Now it has become a cheerleader for the NDP games and there is no win in this for seniors.
LikeReply5 hrs
Ruth Maria Adria
The care of the frail, dependent elderly is the greatest moral and social issue of our time.
Noel Somerville of Public Interest Alberta has painted a rosy picture.
How come this morning we have already received an outcry concerning this, from those who are intimately aware of how Alberta’s elderly are being cared for or not cared for?
After all, this is the same government, that PRIOR to bringing down the budget, froze long term care funding & threatened Long Term Care operators that their funding might even be reduced
These are complex moral issues that cannot be treated lightly. Many individuals soil their hands in regard to this matter
Donna Doran
No one wants to be sick, old, and disabled. We should all work to help individuals who need complex supports which cannot be handled by an aging spouse or other family members. We all would prefer to live in our own homes, but sometimes health issues become too difficult for that.
UnlikeReply1May 18, 2017 9:39pm
Kurt R. Feigel · 

When the goverment builds DSL care units it costs $250-350K. When private operators build them it costs about 1/2 that amount. Tell me how does this save tax payers money? Infact take alook at public run facilities no one wants to stay in them the service is terrible and the cost to run them far exceeds private run facities. Mr Somerville maybe your should do a bit more research before you campain for public run facilities.
LikeReply1May 18, 2017 8:08am
Mark Pearson
Can you prove any of your statements. I have heard some bad things said about privately run seniors establishments. I don't neccessarily accept your argument without a deeper understanding. The problem is the credibility gap that exists on the Con and Rose spectrum that seems to allow them to say anything without any evidence or proof or the distortion of facts that seems very common. Not saying that is the case but that is the problem.
LikeReplyMay 18, 2017 9:14am
Christina Sefton
I think you have it backwards. Private needs to pull a 40% profit.
LikeReplyMay 18, 2017 5:03pm
Vernon Wise
Christina Sefton The Bethany Group has senior homes in over 20 communities in central Alberta and has a record of excellent senior care. The Bethany Group is non-profit.
LikeReplyMay 19, 2017 7:03am
Kurt R. Feigel · 

Mark Pearson I'm on a seniors care board. Yes the numbers I'm quoting are factual.
LikeReplyMay 25, 2017 5:17pm
Kurt R. Feigel · 

Christina Sefton I'm sorry to say but many privately seniors run facilities are running at break even. Some of them are considering handing the keys over and letting the government run them. Your way wrong on the 40% profit margin. I do know anything government runs costs more.
LikeReplyMay 25, 2017 5:20pm
Julie Ali · 

Kurt R. Feigel It costs half that amount perhaps because we are paying for 50% of the infrastructure costs. I don't believe giving private corporations 50% of their real estate infrastructure costs is a good way to do business. We give our cash and we have no assets at the end of the business. We also pay for renovation of these facilities. We may even provide AHS staff to help out the business. This sort of P3 work is a drain on the public purse and for no sort of benefits that I can determine other than government downloading its responsibilities to the private sector.

http://www.seniors-housing.alberta.ca/.../2014-15%20ASLI...
Affordable Supportive Living Initiative
2014-15 project list
October 29, 2015
LikeReply5 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Vernon Wise Not all private continuing care providers are bad but some certainly do not appear to be in the news such as the Cold Lake facility that has recently laid off all its workers.
http://www.aupe.org/.../aupe-media-release-points-west.../

The decision to terminate the Cold Lake workers comes on the heels of a settlement of a collective agreement with AUPE at Points West Living’s Heritage House in Vegreville, which maintained provisions to deter the practice of “working short,” or not replacing staff absent in the case of vacation or illness. The Heritage House agreement also maintained a ban on contracting out.

In contrast, the company has claimed further bargaining with Cold Lake workers would be “a useless formality.”

“Instead of negotiating respectfully, Points West Living is punishing its Cold Lake workers for the strong stand they have taken, and for their outspoken advocacy to address the root problems of Alberta’s senior-care system,” said Smith.

******
It's concerning that the private sector can do what it wants to do in these matters and that the government permits this sort of action.
But perhaps this is the reason why government downloaded care to the private sector.
LikeReply5 hrs

No comments:

Post a Comment