Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Julie Ali 11 mins · CBC News · What is so curious to me is that privacy breaches such as sharing photographs among staff of vulnerable seniors in an Ontario long term care facility-- is considered harmful enough to get you fired but failing to work properly, lacking training that results in harm and other such failures in professional work won't get you termination but mentoring by AHS in Alberta? What the heck? Why are we accepting poor professional standards in the continuing care system? Why are we allowing continuing care facilities such as the Lacombe long term care which is run by the health authority -AHS --to have staff without required training to do the work at the facility? Why did this situation arise and why did it continue until a group of nursing students went as a group to complain? Why were the concerns of families not heard? Why did AHS and Alberta Health's own auditing teams not reporting these problems or were they found and everyone was simply accepting this junk? Who mentors who when the health authority itself is non-compliant? What is Alberta Health doing about the non-compliances of the health authority? Isn't it an oxymoron situation to have the health authority in charge of non-compliances not able to avoid non-compliances in a facility that it runs? Should we not have an independent auditing agency apart from Alberta Health and AHS to give us the real facts of these audits? When will we get such audits? I am speaking of the quality audits done by Alberta Health and AHS when enough folks complain to them. And of course of the CCHSS audits that was leaked in the case of the Lacombe long term care facility by a public spirited employee.


Julie Ali shared Lori Dekervor's post.
34 mins
Five staff at Pioneer Manor have been fired for sharing inappropriate SnapChat images of long-term care residents.
CBC.CA


Julie Ali
Just now
Photographs of residents is a no - no in a long term care facility in Ontario. But in Alberta you can work without required training and do the use of restraints on residents without proper protocol following and it's all good. Folks get put on holidays in Alberta for failures.
I'm guessing it's time we had an independent auditing body. Independent of AHS and Alberta Health which are oversight bodies that apparently can't find the problems in the audits they do every two years but a group of nursing students can find the problems.

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Julie Ali

11 mins

What is so curious to me is that privacy breaches such as sharing photographs among staff of vulnerable seniors in an Ontario long term care facility-- is considered harmful enough to get you fired but failing to work properly, lacking training that results in harm and other such failures in professional work won't get you termination but mentoring by AHS in Alberta? What the heck?
Why are we accepting poor professional standards in the continuing care system? Why are we allowing continuing care facilities such as the Lacombe long term care which is run by the health authority -AHS --to have staff without required training to do the work at the facility? Why did this situation arise and why did it continue until a group of nursing students went as a group to complain? Why were the concerns of families not heard?
Why did AHS and Alberta Health's own auditing teams not reporting these problems or were they found and everyone was simply accepting this junk? Who mentors who when the health authority itself is non-compliant? What is Alberta Health doing about the non-compliances of the health authority?
Isn't it an oxymoron situation to have the health authority in charge of non-compliances not able to avoid non-compliances in a facility that it runs?
Should we not have an independent auditing agency apart from Alberta Health and AHS to give us the real facts of these audits?
When will we get such audits? I am speaking of the quality audits done by Alberta Health and AHS when enough folks complain to them. And of course of the CCHSS audits that was leaked in the case of the Lacombe long term care facility by a public spirited employee.






Five staff at Pioneer Manor have been fired for sharing inappropriate SnapChat images of long-term care residents.
CBC.CA

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So let me get this straight. We have staff taking Snapchat pictures in a long term care facility in Ontario and they get fired.
Meanwhile in the Lacombe long term care facility there was ongoing non-compliances with the full knowledge of AHS staff present at the facility with 4 years of non-compliant accommodation reports and yet no one is fired?
What are we? The mentoring province?

Or just the province that accepts crappy care of the most vulnerable citizens?

Very pathetic. What is required here is some good old terminations like what happened in the Pioneer Manor.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/pioneer-manor-staff-fired-1.4181269

5 Pioneer Manor staff fired after 'inappropriate' Snapchats

Pictures of long-term care residents — mostly vulnerable— were shared with front-line employees.

CBC News Posted: Jun 28, 2017 1:10 PM ET Last Updated: Jun 28, 2017 1:20 PM ET
Five staff at Pioneer Manor were fired after sharing inappropriate photos of long-term care residents, the city said today.
Five staff at Pioneer Manor were fired after sharing inappropriate photos of long-term care residents, the city said today.
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Five front-line staff at Pioneer Manor have been fired for sharing 'inappropriate' Snapchat images of long-term care residents.
Catherine Matheson, general manager of community development for the city, said a complaint from a Pioneer Manor staff member prompted the investigation.
"Inappropriate pictures were taken of residents...vulnerable seniors, most of them," Matheson said.
Matheson said that in some of the photos, patients were aware their picture was being taken. But even with a resident's permission, the accused staff were breaking policy.
Catherine Matheson
Catherine Matheson said police have been notified about the privacy breach. (Supplied- Catherine Matheson)
"Staff are not to have cell phones in use during the time they are working with the residents in our facility," she said.
"To take a picture of an individual then forward it is breaching that person's privacy and rights. That itself is grounds enough for us to be very concerned."

Police have been notified

Snapchat is a mobile app, which takes pictures that delete themselves after a few seconds.
Matheson said the nature of the photos "will not be shared," but the city has contacted police, who will conduct their own investigation.
Pioneer Manor is also in the process of bringing in a third party to review their privacy policies. This should help alleviate any confusion about what's expected of staff, Matheson said.

With files from Casey Stranges, Markus Schwabe
  • Julie Ali
Why are employees fired for privacy breaches in Ontario--but not for non-compliant care in facilities in Alberta? You would think that care breaches would be considered more egregious as offences.

In Alberta we have an AHS run facility at Lacombe with significant levels of non-compliances and failures in staff training and yet no one has faced censure, disciplining or termination.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/leaked-report-prompts-calls-for-further-investigation-into-use-of-restraints-in-alberta-seniors-facilities-1.4116124

As a result of the findings of the Lacombe hospital review, AHS placed three staff members on administrative leave, ordered more staff training, and launched investigations.
********************************************

The Wildrose Party has indicated the failures in oversight and operation at this facility by both AHS and Alberta Health. Professional staff were not trained and were not working within the requirements of their job descriptions. We only found out about these problems because a group of nursing students complained.

Who is interested in patient safety and health? Apparently no one. This sort of situation in Alberta goes on with the full complicity of the GOA. Until the junk is made public.

http://www.wildrose.ca/leaked_documents_highlight_serious_concerns_with_level_of_care_at_lacombe_hospital_and_care_centre_wildrose

Serious breaches that were found as a result of the investigation include:

lack of proper training in medication management and assistance (for those managing medication);
lack of proper training in dementia care (for those assisting clients with dementia); and
lack of proper training in risk management, fall prevention, CPR, palliative/end-of-life care, safe lifts, restraints, and bathing.« less
  • Just now
  •  
Troy Dubé
  • Troy Dubé
I'm not at all surprised by this behaviour. I don't believe for a second that the City of Sudbury was all that surprised by it either.




Julie Ali
1 min
Gotta admire AHS and Alberta Health. We pay them for what? For nothing I guess. A group of nursing students has to do the audit that show us the problems.

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May 09, 2017

Leaked documents highlight serious concerns with level of care at Lacombe Hospital and care centre: Wildrose

Leaked documents show a system in flux at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre (LHCC) and bring to light serious concerns about the level of care provided at the facility, the Wildrose Official Opposition said today.
The documents outline an investigation that was launched in April 2017 as a result of “serious concerns raised about care quality at the site” brought forward by Red Deer College practical nurse students who were completing their practicums at the facility.
Serious breaches that were found as a result of the investigation include:
  • expired aseptic sterile supplies like catheters;
  • soiled linen and garbage overflowing into hallways;
  • slings being used communally without a clear, consistent cleaning process;
  • medication left unsecured, unlabeled, unattended;
  • lack of proper training in medication management and assistance (for those managing medication);
  • lack of proper training in dementia care (for those assisting clients with dementia); and
  • lack of proper training in risk management, fall prevention, CPR, palliative/end-of-life care, safe lifts, restraints, and bathing.
“The findings of this investigation are incredibly concerning, and show that Albertans in the Lacombe area are not receiving the care they deserve, Wildrose Leader Brian Jean said. “If it hadn’t been for the nursing students who were adamant about bringing their concerns forward, these unacceptable standards could have persisted.”
As the documents outline, a formal report is pending. Wildrose is calling on the NDP government to ensure that report is made public to ensure transparency and accountability.
“There are serious failings at the LHCC that must be addressed in order for faith to be restored in our health care system,” Wildrose Lacombe – Ponoka MLA Ron Orr said. “Patients and their loved ones have seen inadequate levels of care that are simply unacceptable, and that must change. Wildrose will hold the NDP government to account to ensure that significant problems found in the initial investigation are fixed.”
Wildrose spoke to concerned residents in Lacombe about the findings of the initial investigation. Lois Cookson’s 89 year old stepfather was a patient at LHCC and said that “he was dying before our eyes in the Lacombe Hospital” with problems that included incorrect testing, filing of testing under the wrong patient’s name, and providing the wrong antibiotic.



Leaked report prompts calls for further investigation into use of restraints in Alberta seniors facilities

'We want to ensure we're using restraining as a last resort,' says senior Alberta Health executive

By Kim Trynacity, CBC News Posted: May 16, 2017 6:00 AM MT Last Updated: May 16, 2017 6:00 AM MT
Health advocates are calling on the provincial government to increase oversight of the use of restraints in seniors-care facilities.
Health advocates are calling on the provincial government to increase oversight of the use of restraints in seniors-care facilities.
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Recent findings of absent or improper monitoring in the use of restraints at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre have prompted calls for greater oversight into how and why restraints are used in seniors facilities across Alberta.
A review of the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre found that "multiple clients" were being physically restrained with no indication the practice had been ordered by a physician.
The review was conducted only after nursing students from Red Deer College raised concerns in March during a practicum at the facility.
Leaked documents with details of the review were made public by the opposition last week, when Wildrose Leader Brian Jean told the legislature conditions in the facility were "appalling."
Sandra Azocar, Friends of Medicare
Sandra Azocar, executive director of Friends of Medicare, says the government needs to tighten up its oversight of how restraints are used in seniors-care facilities. (Linked-In)
According to the documents, some clients "had seatbelts without physicians' orders in place, monitoring, review or documentation in the care plan."
Similar problems were also found with the use of "pharmacological restraints," which are prescribed medications that Friends of Medicare health advocate Sandra Azocar said are another way to describe "sedation, anti-depressants, and anti-anxiety medication."
Under AHS procedures noted in the review, a physician or care team is required to monitor a patient restraint prescription each month.
But that wasn't always the case at the Lacombe facility, where "medication reviews by the physician did not always occur at a minimum of once a month," according to findings of the review.

Concerns raised by seniors and families

Azocar said the use of restraints and medications has frequently been raised as an area of concern in meetings across Alberta with seniors and their families.
"There's quite a bit of a theme happening across the province in seniors care, when it comes to the use of these (restraints)," said Azocar.
Family members are often worried "there's a bit of an overuse," she said.
Friends of Medicare thinks there should be greater oversight of restraint usage in all facilities.
"It's definitely an area where the province needs to put a little bit more oversight and certainly focus on, in terms of how do we make somebody's life a little more bearable when they're in a facility," said Azocar.
Lori Sparrow, senior health executive for AHS central zone, wouldn't comment on the Lacombe findings, because of an ongoing investigation into the problems discovered there.
But Sparrow said every facility is expected to follow a "restraint procedure."
"If it's found that restraint-as-a-last-resort procedure is not being followed," said Sparrow, "then we'll go in and investigate and provide additional education and training for all those who are involved."

Restraints should be 'a last resort'

Sparrow said patients who are restrained are required to be monitored and reassessed every three months, or more often if necessary.
"We have a least-restraint policy," said Sparrow. "We want to ensure we're using restraining as a last resort."
Restraint should only be used when a patient poses a danger to themselves or others, she said.
Sparrow said facility audits are performed every two years to ensure standards are being followed.
Despite concerns expressed to Friends of Medicare about restraints, performance measures tracked by the Canadian Institute of Health Research show the rate of usage of chemical and physical restraints in Alberta is below the national average, and declining.
As of November 2016, the CIHI data shows 6.9 per cent of residents in Alberta long-term care facilities were restrained, compared to the national average of 7.4 per cent. The Alberta percentage compared to 8.6 per cent the previous year.
The Lacombe Hospital and Care facility is now under investigation by Alberta Health Services
A review of operations at the Lacombe Hospital and Care Centre uncovered problems with the use of mechanical and pharmacological restraints. (Google)
There has also been a steady drop in the use of anti-psychotic drugs in Alberta as a restraining measure in seniors care, according to the CIHI report.
What CIHI calls "potentially inappropriate" use of anti-psychotic drugs in Alberta long-term care facilities has dropped in recent years, from a peak of 36 per cent in north zone facilities in 2012-2013 to 24.8 per cent in 2015-2016. CIHI said the measure tracks "the percentage of residents who receive an anti-psychotic medication without a diagnosis of psychosis."
CIHI said the overall number for Alberta is now at 18.1 per cent, compared to 26.5 per cent in 2012-2013.
Anti-psychotic drugs, according to CIHI, are "a class of medication used for the treatment of acute and chronic psychosis" that could have adverse effects, especially on seniors. They are deemed appropriate, however, "when used in the treatment of chronic mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia and to manage psychosis," such as hallucinations.
As a result of the findings of the Lacombe hospital review, AHS placed three staff members on administrative leave, ordered more staff training, and launched investigations.
One investigation is being conducted under the the Protection for Persons in Care unit of Alberta Health.
The group responds to reports of potential abuse of patients in hospitals or nursing homes, in addition to examining accommodation standards.



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