Thursday, June 1, 2017

Julie Ali 1 min · CBC News · Elizabeth Wettlaufer admits to the murders. She has mental illness and yet she was able to murder people without any sort of detection. How is this possible? Medication is strictly monitored in facilities and so this must mean that audits did not find the medication problems or if they did nothing was done about these matters--such as an indepth investigation. So this means that if this nurse had not admitted to these murders, there might have been more of them. Wow. What sort of auditing system is there in Ontario? It's got more legislation, it's got resident rights, it has public revelations of audits and critical care incident reports for long term care on a website and we still don't get protection for defenceless seniors in care? http://www.cbc.ca/…/wettlaufer-court-nurse-killings-plead-g… Parker said her daughter, who has been staying at the Vanier Centre for Women in Milton, Ont., has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and is receiving medication. "What has been lost in the media is that had Beth not come forward, police never would have known any of this. She's dealing with this the best she can," Parker said. Wettlaufer waived her right to a preliminary hearing in April and instead opted to go straight to trial. Ex-nurse who killed 8 seniors says she got 'a laughing feeling' after injecting patient Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer, who admits killing eight people in long-term care homes, said in court that she injected patients with insulin with the intention of… CBC.CA LikeShow more reactionsCommentShare


CARP tells us that they have been informed about abuse, neglect and fatality in continuing care in Canada and feel that a public inquiry needs to be done now that Elizabeth Wettlaufer came forward with the murders of seniors.
So great. Finally after decades of work in Alberta, Ruth Adria might have some one at CRAP --I mean CARP contacting her to offer their help? Where are you CARP folks? Only here when a nurse tells us about the mess in the continuing care system in Ontario?
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The sort of betrayal that devastates a family. It's the sort of betrayal that I felt when I saw the Do Not Resuscitate orders and the No ICU orders. Then the No intubation orders. My sister was under physician orders for premature termination at the Grey Nuns Hospital. There is no betrayal worse than that of encountering professionals who don't want to save a life but instead end it. Premature termination that is perfectly legal in Alberta because it is a doctor order.



And of course there are those with mental illness like this nurse who do succeed in termination events.  In this case, the termination ends were not perfectly legal.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/wettlaufer-court-nurse-killings-plead-guilty-1.4140973

Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer felt 'red surge' before killing elderly patients

Injections of insulin were used to kill seniors in long-term care homes in 3 Ontario communities

By Kate Dubinski, Kerry McKee, CBC News Posted: Jun 01, 2017 10:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jun 01, 2017 8:54 PM ET
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She was angry about her career and her life, and her elderly patients, some suffering from dementia, were easy prey.
Former registered nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer, 49, who pleaded guilty in Superior Court in Woodstock, Ont., today to 14 charges including first-degree murder, attempted murder and aggravated assault, told the court that a "red surge" would come over her when she was about to kill someone.
Wettlaufer worked at homes in the Ontario communities of Woodstock, Paris and London, often as the registered nurse overseeing the nightshifts.
In October, Wettlaufer was charged in the deaths of eight residents at nursing homes in Woodstock and London. In January, she faced six additional charges related to seniors in her care. She worked at the facilities between 2007 and 2014.
Family members of Wettlaufer's victims were faced with a long and emotional day in court. Some broke down in the courtroom as Wettlaufer entered her pleas.
Superior Court Justice Bruce Thomas told the families, "I can't imagine the betrayal" and said their strength dealing with what they saw in court impressed him.
They have already heard that the ex-nurse told police she used insulin pens to administer lethal and non-lethal doses of the drug to kill eight people and seriously harm six.
Family members in Wettlaufer court
Family members of Elizabeth Wettlaufer's victims arrive at the Woodstock courthouse on Thursday. (Kerry McKee/CBC News)

'A laughing feeling'

Wettlaufer stood up straight and spoke clearly and concisely as she pleaded guilty to the charges.
"You realize that first-degree murder is punishable with life in prison?" Justice Bruce Thomas asked Wettlaufer.
"Yes, your honour," she answered.
In one case, a victim's family had thanked Wettlaufer for her care, having no idea she had just killed the patient.
After injecting another of her victims, she got what she told police was "a laughing feeling."
She left on a Caribbean cruise the next day.
Wettlaufer confirmed that she was not intoxicated by drugs or alcohol while injecting victims with insulin with the intent to kill.
"You knew this could be fatal?" Thomas asked Wettlaufer.
"Yes, your honour," she answered.

Chilling video confession

"I honestly thought God wanted to use me," Wettlaufer told police during an almost three-hour taped confession that was played in court Thursday afternoon.
Wettlaufer says on the tape she had resigned from her last job, with Saint Elizabeth Health Care, after five weeks because she was told she would be caring for diabetic children at a school in Ingersoll, Ont., and she feared she wouldn't be able to keep herself from harming them. She told police that was her "breaking point."
On the tape, Wettlaufer describes how she killed her first victim, James Silcox, while working at the Caressant Care home in Woodstock.
She told police she knew Silcox had dementia and said "there were others before him" whom she tried to kill.
She said the home kept insulin in the refrigerator, which gave her "easy access" to it.
After Silcox died, Wettlaufer said she felt awful, but "just went home to bed."

'She must be the next'

She claimed that another one of her victims, Mary Zurawinski, told her she believed she would die soon, which Wettlaufer said was a trigger for her.
"She didn't hurt the nurses or anything, she was just very outspoken and feisty, and one night she said, 'You know, I'm going to die tonight,'" Wettlaufer told police. "I said, 'Are you sure?' and she said, 'Yeah, put me to bed. I'm going to die.' So I said, 'OK, then.'"
Wettlaufer said she got another one of the nurses on duty to help her get Zurawinski to bed.
"And I thought, 'Well, she must be the next one.' I had a feeling inside of me that she must be the next one."
Caressant Care suspended Wettlaufer several times before firing her. Wettlaufer told police that within a month of being fired from the Woodstock home, she was hired at Meadow Park in nearby London. In the taped confession, Wettlaufer tells police that Meadow Park managers knew she had been fired from Caressant Care for medication errors, but she was told they believed "in second chances."
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'I'm not going to forgive her'

Susan Horvath, the daughter of one of the seniors Wettlaufer has admitted to killing, spoke to CBC News on her way into court Thursday.
"She will be telling us why and how, and we will all know the final moments of our loved one's lives," said Horvath, whose father, Arpad Horvath, was murdered.
Horvath later told CBC Radio's As It Happens, "I'm not going to forgive her for nothing, she knew what she was doing."
Nursing Home Probe 20170601
Susan Horvath, daughter of Arpad Horvath Sr., one of former nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer's victims, takes a break outside of the Provincial courthouse in Woodstock, Ont., on Thursday, following the portion of Wettlaufer's video confession where she spoke about Mr. Horvath's death. (Peter Power/Canadian Press)
During her taped confession, Wettlaufer said she laughed when a co-worker suggested that Arpad Horvath's blood sugar had spiked dangerously due to a past stroke, and not due to her attempts to kill him with insulin.
Shortly after that section of tape was played in court, the victim's son, Arpad Jr., left the courtroom with help from court staff, tears streaming down his face.
Arpad Horvath Jr is a tough man. He just left the courtroom w help from court staff. Weeping, tears streaming down his face.

Bipolar disorder diagnosed

Wettlaufer's mother, Hazel Parker, told CBC News her daughter had asked that her parents not be in court for her appearance today.
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Parker said her daughter, who has been staying at the Vanier Centre for Women in Milton, Ont., has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and is receiving medication.
"What has been lost in the media is that had Beth not come forward, police never would have known any of this. She's dealing with this the best she can," Parker said.
Wettlaufer waived her right to a preliminary hearing in April and instead opted to go straight to trial.
The families of those Wettlauffer killed were told their victim impact statements will likely be read in court June 26 and June 27, when Wettlaufer is scheduled to be sentenced.
The police investigation into Wettlaufer began last September after Toronto police became aware of information she had given to staff at a psychiatric hospital in Toronto that caused them concern, a police source told The Canadian Press.
Records from the College of Nurses of Ontario show Wettlaufer was first registered as a nurse in August 1995, and resigned Sept. 30, 2016.
The Live Blog from the court on June 1:
With files from John Lancaster and Laura Fraser



Julie Ali
1 min

Elizabeth Wettlaufer admits to the murders. She has mental illness and yet she was able to murder people without any sort of detection. How is this possible? Medication is strictly monitored in facilities and so this must mean that audits did not find the medication problems or if they did nothing was done about these matters--such as an indepth investigation. So this means that if this nurse had not admitted to these murders, there might have been more of them. Wow. What sort of auditing system is there in Ontario? It's got more legislation, it's got resident rights, it has public revelations of audits and critical care incident reports for long term care on a website and we still don't get protection for defenceless seniors in care?
http://www.cbc.ca/…/wettlaufer-court-nurse-killings-plead-g…
Parker said her daughter, who has been staying at the Vanier Centre for Women in Milton, Ont., has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and is receiving medication.
"What has been lost in the media is that had Beth not come forward, police never would have known any of this. She's dealing with this the best she can," Parker said.
Wettlaufer waived her right to a preliminary hearing in April and instead opted to go straight to trial.

Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer, who admits killing eight people in long-term care homes, said in court that she injected patients with insulin with the intention of…
CBC.CA

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Meanwhile we have CARP asking for a public inquiry.  I doubt that there will be one because in Canada there is no interest in seniors or their deaths. I imagine the folks in the Government of Ontario shuddering at the very idea of a public inquiry.

In Alberta the inquiry would lead to the yapping of families and end the silencing of the advocates by retribution events of banning and lawsuits.

Nope there won't be a public inquiry. There won't be anything other than the usual spin.



And where has CARP been all these years while Ruth Adria has been working all by herself to get the word out on neglect, harm, premature termination (euthanasia), fatality and abuse to the public?  Where has CARP been? Yapping no doubt with government and doing nothing.

 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/seniors-deaths-long-term-care-1.4141487

Seniors group calls for inquiry into abuse and deaths in long-term care homes

Nurse said she killed patients using insulin, knew that long-term care home didn't monitor insulin supplies

By Kate Dubinski, CBC News Posted: Jun 01, 2017 1:18 PM ET Last Updated: Jun 01, 2017 4:47 PM ET
(Theo Heimann/Getty Images)
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A national advocacy group for seniors is calling for a public inquiry into abuse and deaths of elderly patients in Canada.
The call comes on the same day as former Woodstock, Ont. nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer, pleaded guilty to killing eight seniors and harming six others while she worked in long-term care homes in three Ontario communities.
"The murder of these eight elderly residents in their long-term care facility puts a disturbing spotlight on long-term care," said Wanda Morris, the vice president of advocacy for Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP).
"What is worse is that this case is not an isolated incident. For years, we've heard stories about residents who suffered or die to neglect, abuse and violence in facilities meant to be providing care."
Elizabeth Wettlaufer in Court June 1, 2017
Former nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer enters Woodstock's Superior Court of Justice Thursday morning, where she is expected to plead guilty to first-degree murder charges. (Martin Trainor/CBC )
In a videotape confession to police, Wettlaufer said she knew the long-term care home in which she worked didn't monitor insulin supplies. She told court she understood she was going to cause harm by injecting seniors, some with dementia, with insulin that they weren't prescribed.
The national advocacy group wants a public inquiry into the "abuse, neglect and untimely deaths of long-term care residents in Canada," according to a statement.
"CARP is very concerned about attitudes and behaviours towards our most vulnerable Canadians in long-term care," Morris said in the statement. "A public inquiry is long-overdue."




If CARP has been so concerned about the CRAP that has been going on in continuing care in Canada where the heck were they when the families were yapping about problems in Alberta?
I'd say CARP isn't concerned about seniors or the abuse of seniors. Nope. If CARP members were interested they'd be helping advocates who have been doing the mountain of work in Alberta --like Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society. Has CRAP -- I mean CARP ever met with Ruth Adria? So if they haven't please don't tell us that CARP really cares. If CARP really cares, it would be lobbying government big time. It has the resources. It just doesn't have the balls.

The Canadian Association of Retired Persons, an advocacy group for seniors, is calling for a public inquiry into abuse and deaths of elderly patients in Canada.
CBC.CA

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