Thursday, June 8, 2017

“It’s important that we work together to get the right strategy, the Made in Alberta strategy,” she told the Journal.

I continue to be amazed at the faith of NDP voters with reference to the party. It's like the blind loyalty of the PC voters with reference to the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta. We don't need to have loyalty folks. We need to have a requirement for performance rather than promises.

As the voters and citizens of a democracy we need both the work and the results of the work. So far I've seen only the same promises of the PCs regurgitated by the NDPCs.
It's troubling but only two more years to go of poor performance and we hire new folks.

While it is true that we need to work together as per the chatter below we also need to have something present for families who are struggling with the care of family members with dementia. Just making working groups, gathering for discussions and rip roaring fun isn't my idea of performance.

What we need are actual working plans translated into strategy with policy/procedures resulting from this work. Based on the time it takes for the over extended and underfunded AHS folks to do the policy and procedure maybe the large staff at the Alberta Health department should get cracking on the strategy, the policies and the procedures which will help families actually get reliable services, supports and appropriate care for family members. So far other than the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital I see no sort of dementia helps in place. Maybe the government is depending on groups like the Alzheimer's Society to do the work the government is plainly not able to do?


Why have both the PCs and NDPCS failed at a dementia strategy? Could it be that they don't want to succeed?

#WingingIt--Frankly I am bewildered that the major department of Alberta Health can't come up with a dementia strategy despite working since October 2014 for this purpose. How many people do you need to make a strategy?
Let me think. I would say just one. The Minister of Health.
These are some suggestions I have for the Minister:
1) Provide a care plan to all dementia patients and have them in long term care placements rather than warehoused in SL4- Dementia wards where I don't see any sort of interactions going on.
2) Make communities for these patients--because they are patients in home like environments where family and friends are welcomed. Don't go the hospital route but have RNs required. Why? We're dealing with a friable population of seniors and don't think that you can hand them over to LPNs with limited training or personal care attendants for the purpose of changing diapers and we'll be happy with this sort of minimal care. Nope. These folks are still human beings and deserve the quality care of all of us.
3) Provide helps for families struggling with dementia patients at home. What we have now is a fragmented home care system that is pretty useless. I guess handing over home care to the private sector doesn't result in good outcomes. Why not have AHS provide home care via the AHS folks --not through a group of piecemeal providers?
4) Provide the training to staff. We can't expect staff to learn about dementia by magic. There are mental health services required. There should be integrated care plans provided by specialists. We don't seem to have such support at present.
5) Ask families to be part of the working groups. Why aren't we? What are we? Machines to be worked on? We're the owners of the entire system. We run government.

I continue to be amazed at the faith of NDP voters with reference to the party. It's like the blind loyalty of the PC voters with reference...
READINGCHILDRENSBOOKS.BLOGSPOT.COM

LikeShow more reactions
Comment
http://edmontonjournal.com/news/politics/alberta-dementia-strategy-coming-soon-health-minister-promises?fb_comment_id=fbc_1444333008922606_1444756805546893_1444756805546893#f1757c22fd8c2b4

Alberta dementia strategy coming soon, health minister promises

Published on: June 5, 2017 | Last Updated: June 5, 2017 5:52 PM MDT
Deputy Premier Sarah Hoffman
Alberta Health Minister Sarah Hoffman. DAVID BLOOM / POSTMEDIA
Alberta health officials are hashing out the details of a provincial dementia strategy, to be unveiled in the coming weeks.
Dementia cases are set to skyrocket as the population ages, with one in every 30 Albertans projected to be living with the disease by 2025.
For Alzheimers Society CEO Michele Mulder, a provincial strategy is critically important.
But Mulder, much like Health Minister Sarah Hoffman, doesn’t want to rush it.
“It’s important that we work together to get the right strategy, the Made in Alberta strategy,” she told the Journal.
Ideally, Mulder said, the strategy needs to focus on the future and be comprehensive enough to meet the complex needs of people living with the disease.
A strategy has been in the works since October 2014, and Alberta Health mentioned the project in its 2015-16 annual report.
It’s still nowhere to be seen, but Hoffman said Monday developing the plan is a priority for her department.
Alberta Party Leader Greg Clark recently blasted Hoffman in the house over the lack of a provincial strategy, saying he was concerned about the government’s commitment to dementia care.
“Without a strategy, how do you know what you’re doing and why you’re doing it and if the resources are in place that you need?” he asked.
In response, Hoffman cited increases in long-term care and dementia care spaces as proof the province is taking steps to deal with the growing numbers of people suffering from cognitive impairment.  

Sights set on supports

On Monday, Hoffman said along with more care beds, a big part of the strategy will focus on partnerships with community agencies.
“We’re also working to make sure we’ve got the right strategy with the right resources to keep families as close together as possible, and of course keep residents safe,” Hoffman said.
For Mulder, the ideal plan will work hand-in-hand with the upcoming national dementia strategy, and improve the quality of life of dementia patients and their care-givers.
Mulder said it would also keep dementia patients in their homes or home communities for as long as possible.
“That’s the goal we all want to work for,” she said.  
egraney@postmedia.com


20 Comments
Sort by
Julie Ali · 

As far as I can determine the GOA approach to the upcoming dementia Tsunami is to ignore the sea. In other words, there is no strategy, there is no plan and everyone is winging it.

What this means for families is that we have to take care of our own at home. Families with enough money might be to pay for private care providers. Putting your family member in the continuing care system is not ideal. The Patient Care Based Funding business  (PCBF) is pretty poor in my opinion. Apparently PCBF is supposed to provide more money for more work but this does not seem to be the case in the experience of our family. I'm not sure what sorts of helps are available for dementia patient actually but I am not optimistic about the integrated care plans for these patients.

Also the dementia cases do not appear to be considered long term care patients where there are at least RNs around. These patients are considered supportive living-4-Dementia cases and I don't know if this is the right place for these folks.

In any case, my feeling is that families are the primary caregivers of patients with dementia. This means burnt out spouses, extended family acting as personal care attendants 24/7. I guess there could be home care of sorts but our experience of home care was that it was a fragmented system with many providers and the entire business was more work than just doing it yourself.

I would not depend on the GOA for a dementia strategy. Best to make up a care plan by yourself or with the help of the Glenrose Rehabilitiation Hospital where you can get competent help from a geriatric specialist. But just remember--the family is going to have to do the work of caring for dementia patients because the GOA has been waffling on a strategy just as it has been waffling about the long term care beds and the underfunding of the continuing care system. All talk. All spin. No action.
LikeReply2Jun 5, 2017 9:41pm
Dar Dealmeida
Waffling you must be talking about the previous government! The NDP government will repair the broken system and when they mean family is number one, they mean keep,the family close because they are our loved ones! It's the Conservatives that want to privatize health care and force people to care for their own entirely and of course by doing this they know if it happens to them they will have the money and the means to hire the care!
LikeReply6 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Dar Dealmeida I doubt that the NDP folks are any more interested in families than the PCs were. They used the stand up for your families spin to get us to vote for them.
Since they got to the GOA they are basically not interested in anything to do with families as far as I can determine.
Where is the change in the continuing care system? Our families are there and I've yet to see any changes.
LikeReply2 hrs
Dar Dealmeida
Good plan, keeping patients near families is number one! Second is ensuring that the private care centers are operating properly. Sufficient staffing is my concern! We do not need care givers in the kitchen and laundry areas - care givers should stick to the patients! I believe private centers often cut corners because they are more concerned with their take home then the people!
LikeReply6Jun 5, 2017 2:20pm
Dar Dealmeida
Cut costs that is!
LikeReplyJun 5, 2017 5:24pm
Julie Ali · 

Yeah it is a good plan. No need to build long term care facilities if the dementia cases can be serviced more cheaply in SL4-Dementia wards. Even better if they are home because the family can service the patient. It's a win win for the partners in care. For the burnt out spouses, children and extended family-its heart work and the time of our lives.
The dementia strategy like most of the work done at Alberta Health and AHS appears to be all chatter and then poor decision making as in the case of the $14.2 million wasted on the Pure North program for no deliverables. Far better to develop humane dementia communities where the end of life might be decent rather than fragmented. But then we'd require a government with the public interest in mind-- to do this sort of work.
LikeReply1Jun 5, 2017 9:44pm
Peggy Beres · 

You are so right about that! And staff training is of paramount importance. My husband is in a for profit care facility, and my friends husband is in advanced stages of dementia/altzheimers. And one of the caregivers actually asked her what was wrong with her husband. If they are working there they should know that! And I also agree that I think the bottom line comes first!
UnlikeReply1Jun 7, 2017 11:43am
Dar Dealmeida
Julie Ali
I can tell you that dealing with family issues like this during the Conservative reign was an absolute disaster! During Klein's years they shut doors down and laid off care workers so that people (taxpayers) had to be moved away from family just so that they could find a bed! This was insanely bad and unfair to family! At least we know that the NDP group will not avoid Albertans that can no longer vote!
LikeReply12 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Peggy Beres The lack of training of staff is amazing. You have downgrading of the professionals as a cost saving move. The physician is replaced with a nurse practitioner. With all due respect to the NPs, I doubt they can do the same job as the physician. We have work previously done by specific professionals such as respiratory therapist outsourced to nurses who do not have the pulmonary training to do this sort of work being expected to meet the need of respiratory residents.

We have residents without updated care plans and no appropriate supports and services for their disabilities. The ability to service those with mental health disabilities is abominable. The lack of supports for staff who are expected to handle a wide range of patients as if they were magicians is mind boggling. When I asked for a referral for mental health services once I read in the nursing notes of the comments of the nurse accepting the referral. She commented that the sister could not refer. What the heck? If a patient is in long term care, and the family is asking for a referral there should not be this song and dance to get the referral.

Meanwhile we have the chatter from successive health ministers that abuse will not be tolerated. What are non-compliances, poor staff:resident ratios, lack of training other than abuse of these human beings without any resident rights and seemingly without human rights as well? They're a captive customer pool lacking a voice in our society. And when famillies complain or discourse publicly we face retribution. Time to get together as families and keep changing the political parties until this junk ends. Pronto. It's been forty four years of failures with the PCs and now two years with the NDPCs. Families are not going to stay silent any longer.
LikeReply5 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Dar Dealmeida I really doubt that the NDP folks are dealing with family issues. In my family's case what have the NDP folks done? Let's see. They downgraded my handicapped sister from long term care to SL4 status, they did not amend the Trespass to Premises legislation to allow for an independent appeal process, they pretend the solution is a banning policy by AHS when a residents' rights legislation is long over due in Alberta.

What have the NDP done for the families whose kids died in the child welfare system? They did #PanelPolitics. Just like the PCs did their Roundtable of Spin. They make legislation that increases secrecy about child deaths and they tell us that every child death will be investigated.

If you ask me this group is worse than the PCs. At least with the PCs we knew they were not representing us.

We trusted the NDP and voted for them. This betrayal of the most vulnerable citizens in Alberta will not be forgotten by families. We are going to vote them out. Better to have the wolves we know of rather than the sheep who pretend to be our friends.
LikeReply4 hrsEdited
Heather Barrett
She needs to leave the leg and look to rural areas as well she was asked to visit an area raising funds for a CT scanner but rural Alberta was certainly not her prority!!! Wait tell it's her mother grandmother etc trying to find a bed close and quick not quite so simple!! Looking forward to hearing her solutions haven't seen much success with anything she has put forward well except her apology when she speaks unpolitically correct!!!
Troy Dixon · 

This has been addressed locally ....waiting on government feed ....
LikeReply1Jun 6, 2017 5:19pm
Julie Ali · 

She has travelled everywhere. Now is the time for her to make decisions that matter to families in the continuing care system. So far all I have seen is public relations spin. Troubling.
Maybe families need to go to the minister's constituency and talk to the voters there. We don't get heard.
LikeReply5 hrs
Richard Guyon
This comment is collapsed. Undo
John Paterson · 

I have an idea. Let's go $94 billion dollars in debt by 2020, so we don't have the money for the dementia onslaught. Yeah.
UnlikeReply4Jun 5, 2017 9:40pmEdited
Harvey Bishop
John Paterson You can thank the Alberta PCs, after Peter Lougheed left office, for virtually depleting Alberta's finances from multitudes of very costly scandals and neglect. They also badly neglected health care in Alberta. Time to play catch up.
LikeReply1Jun 5, 2017 10:01pm
John Paterson · 

At worst, the PC'S left a $17 billion dollar debt. The NDP is adding $80 billion to that. When we are paying $3-4 billion dollars a year in interest, or more if interest rates rise, and they will rise under Trudeau, there is no money for catching up. It will be one year after another and after another of cutbacks and more cutbacks until we are doing nothing more than paying interest. After three years, it's time to lay to rest any argument about PC mismanagement.
LikeReply3Jun 5, 2017 10:14pm
Dar Dealmeida
John Paterson
At least now we know the debt is being spent on needed infrastructure, job creation, diversifying the economy - what makes the province strong! Previously with the Conservatives it went to pad their back pockets and to the top 1% - you know the tax evaders!
LikeReply7 hrs
John Paterson · 

No. We dont know how the NDP is spending the money. For all we know Soros is getting everything. Building infrastructure through debt financing just means selling the infrastructure later on to meet the conditions of creditors. It eventually means not owning a thing and still having debt to pay.
UnlikeReply16 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Dar Dealmeida Debt is being collected for what? In one case, the PCs gave the Pure North folks $10 milion upfront. The NDPCs then added to this bill by giving this alternative health program with no deliverables that I can see another $4.2 million.

http://www.cbc.ca/.../sarah-hoffman-pure-north-alberta...
Health Minister Sarah Hoffman either misled the legislature or her senior staff withheld critical information from her about health safety issues related to a program offered by a private alternative health foundation to which she approved millions of dollars in funding, an internal briefing note shows.

In a March interview with CBC News, Hoffman said she knew nothing about serious health safety issues identified in government documents related to the Calgary-based Pure North S'Energy Foundation before she approved a $4.2-million grant to the foundation in October 2016 for a primary-care clinic.

On April 10, in response to questions from Wildrose MLA Tany Yao, Hoffman told the legislature she still had no specific knowledge of health risks associated with the foundation's alternative health program.

But an Alberta Health Services (AHS) briefing note shows that on Sept. 28, 2016 — a month before her ministry signed the $4.2-million grant agreement — Hoffman's office was told health officials had previously identified the "potential for negative health effects" resulting from the foundation's distribution of high-dose supplements to vulnerable populations.

"Either she has misrepresented the facts inside the house, or her staff haven't provided her with the appropriate information, both of which should be very concerning," Wildrose accountability critic Nathan Cooper said in an interview.
*******

How do these decisions help citizens? We have science projects that deliver results and health programs required in seniors care but the NDPCs simply continue the bad decision making of the Tories to promote a program with no benefits to citizens and possible health risks.

Also how does a loan of $235 million to the orphan well program help us? This is the liability of big oil. Why are we financing their polluter pay work? Why was $30 million from federal money meant for economic stimulation given to big oil to ensure this "loan" is tax free? The NDP folks are far more wasteful than the PCs if you ask me. Sure the PCs had a Tapcal Fund, blew up hospitals and built a Sky Palace. But we have the NDPCs deceiving us with their pre-election chatter where there was no mention of a carbon tax.This carbon tax is a greenwashing GST that in no way reduces the use of oil by citizens. How can it? They are taking from us all to return to most citizens the tax. The rest of the revenue goes to other greenwashing projects that could not be possible because without our cash they are not economically feasible. If you ask me this so called climate leadership plan is nothing but buffing up the image of big oil to the world which isn't buying it.

Meanwhile we have poverty, seniors, handicapped folks and nothing done about these matters. Where is the job creation? I guess citizens who are unemployed are making their own jobs by starting their own businesses. The NDP folks are lost in the wilderness and won't be rehired because they have no map, no plan and are putting us into major debt for no damn reason.
LikeReply2 hrsEdited
Julie Ali · 

Harvey Bishop Where is the catch up in the continuing care system? Is the health care system the only priority? What about seniors and handicapped citizens in the continuing care system?
LikeReply17 mins
Yvonne Spornitz · 
Works at Red Deer PCN

The simple fact is people are living to a MUCH older age than in olden days! Some memory loss can occur in later years, and the fact we are living well beyond our ancestors is the prime factor in rates rising
Donald Melnick · 

Dementia caused by trying to calculate how far NDP will leave our children in debt.
LikeReply2Jun 6, 2017 4:09pm
Dar Dealmeida
At least our educated children know it is for the future and it's wise to spend now - low interest rates, seriously needed infrastructure, job creation, creating economic diversity - they are brighter then the people that spout about the debt and are suckered in by the fear mongering opposition!
LikeReply7 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Dar Dealmeida Infrastructure to a certain degree was required. There was deferred maintenance for no good reason during the PC error. But we did not need to subsidize the orphan well program of the oil and gas industry that is sitting on billions in assets. What was needed in this case was courage and backbone -both of which was absent.
The handover of federal economic stimulation money to pay for the interest charges of a $235 million "loan" indicates only the willingness of the NDP folks to be the PCs and subvert the public interest in favour of the private interests of big oil. Way to go NDP folks!
As for the "suckered by the fear mongering opposition" crack didn't we have this same line proposed to us by the PCs as we booted them out? This line is guaranteed to get Albertans like myself to vote anything but NDP. We're not fear mongering. We are expressing genuine concern with the size of the debt. Where is this money coming from? Are there plans to siphon money from the Heritage Trust Fund? Are the folks in the GOA simply ignoring the fact that citizens are working to pay taxes that are being used irresponsibly? This is poor governance and we know it.
LikeReply2 hrs
Sian George · 

Well this is not right ... she's two g if she thinks this is an aging problem.
LikeReply1Jun 6, 2017 6:50pm
Shirley Karst · 

Wondering why such a high percentage of seniors having dementia??
Hunno Bunjeman
With her health dementia is just around the corner, every corner
Dar Dealmeida
Mark Mitchell
People who post like you do just demonstrate a lack of intelligence, substance and class!
LikeReply7 hrs
Julie Ali · 
Dar Dealmeida He has a right to say his opinion. I tend to agree with him. I mean I am no fan of the PCs after reading the facts of their history but the NDPCs are no better. Just better spin but same waste of public dollars for the private interests.
LikeReply2 hrs




http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/sarah-hoffman-pure-north-alberta-health-1.4116502


CBC INVESTIGATES

Alberta Health Minister Sarah Hoffman's credibility questioned on Pure North issue

Internal briefing note raises doubts about Hoffman’s statements in legislature

By Jennie Russell, Charles Rusnell, CBC News Posted: May 16, 2017 5:00 AM MT Last Updated: May 16, 2017 5:00 AM MT
Health Minister Sarah Hoffman has said she knew nothing about health safety issues related to the private health foundation her ministry recently funded.
Health Minister Sarah Hoffman has said she knew nothing about health safety issues related to the private health foundation her ministry recently funded. (CBC News)
1412 shares


Facebook




Twitter




Reddit




Google




Share




Email


Related Stories

Health Minister Sarah Hoffman either misled the legislature or her senior staff withheld critical information from her about health safety issues related to a program offered by a private alternative health foundation to which she approved millions of dollars in funding, an internal briefing note shows.
In a March interview with CBC News, Hoffman said she knew nothing about serious health safety issues identified in government documents related to the Calgary-based Pure North S'Energy Foundation before she  approved a $4.2-million grant to the foundation in October 2016 for a primary-care clinic.
On April 10, in response to questions from Wildrose MLA Tany Yao, Hoffman told the legislature she still had no specific knowledge of health risks associated with the foundation's alternative health program.
But an Alberta Health Services (AHS) briefing note shows that on Sept. 28, 2016 — a month before her ministry signed the $4.2-million grant agreement — Hoffman's office was told health officials had previously identified the "potential for negative health effects" resulting from the foundation's distribution of high-dose supplements to vulnerable populations.
"Either she has misrepresented the facts inside the house, or her staff haven't provided her with the appropriate information, both of which should be very concerning," Wildrose accountability critic Nathan Cooper said in an interview.
The Wildrose obtained the briefing note through a freedom of information request and provided it to CBC News.
Hoffman's press secretary Tim Wilson did not acknowledge an interview request from CBC News last week. Hoffman has also repeatedly refused to answer questions about lobbying and allegations of conflict of interest involving her deputy minister, Carl Amrhein, who was a participant in the Pure North program.
Pure North is a privately run, non-profit foundation that offers an unproven alternative health program involving high doses of supplements, including vitamin D. The foundation focuses its work on vulnerable populations and operates free programs at homeless shelters and drug recovery centres.

'Potential for negative health effects'

The September 2016 briefing note was prepared for Hoffman and AHS chief executive officer Dr. Verna Yiu. Called "Issues and Key Messages," it was intended to alert them to issues about Pure North contained in AHS records that were to be released to CBC News under freedom of information.
Dr. Verna Yiu
A briefing note prepared for AHS Dr. Verna Yiu outlined concerns with the Pure North alternative health program.
Pure North at that time was seeking a total of $50 million in funding to "improve depression and anxiety in the homeless and those suffering from addictions in Calgary and Edmonton" through high-dose vitamin supplements and the removal of mercury-based dental fillings. The briefing note states there is "insufficient evidence" that either treatment works.
CBC News reported in early April that Alberta Health gave Pure North $10 million in December 2013, against the advice of ministry officials, to expand its program ultimately to thousands of Alberta seniors.
The briefing note specifically warns Hoffman and Yiu about an incident, identified by CBC News as occurring at the Calgary Drop-In Centre in 2013, in which AHS dietitians raised concerns about Pure North's supplement program.
"The concerns were about the potential for negative health effects [from the] non-evidence-based practice of providing megadoses of vitamins and minerals exceeding recommended levels," the briefing note states, adding an additional concern was that "the individuals offered these megadoses may not have the ability to properly assess the safety of what is being offered."
A Pure North spokesperson has said the foundation was not told about the drop-in centre incident. Despite the concerns of public health officials, Pure North points to research studies it says show the program is safe and effective.

Minister should be aware of risks

Dr. Alun Edwards, a senior AHS medical director, is quoted in the briefing note as saying the Pure North program "hits the borderline for appropriateness."
Cooper said it is "concerning" that AHS has detailed safety concerns with the Pure North program, yet Hoffman does not appear to be investigating them.
Nathan Cooper
Wildrose accountability critic Nathan Cooper says Hoffman needs to explain a briefing note that appears to contradict her public statements. (Legislative Assembly of Alberta)
"The minister absolutely must be aware of any risks or concerns with the ongoings of the program," he said. "She is the one that needs to be responsible to ensure that those who are engaged in the program are safe and receiving appropriate care."
When Hoffman became health minister in 2015, she refused, based on advice from her officials, to give Pure North more funding for its seniors program. But in October 2016, her ministry signed a grant with the foundation for a nurse-practitioner-led primary care clinic in Calgary. The grant is worth up to $4.2 million over several years.
Hoffman has insisted Pure North will not be offering any of its alternative-health treatments at its primary care clinic and it will not refer patients to its other program.
Cooper said the Wildrose will continue to press for answers from Hoffman in the legislature.
"We are seeing a track record from this government of a lack of openness and transparency" Cooper said. "And now we see the health department ducking and weaving on a very, very important issue of transparency."  

No comments:

Post a Comment