Thursday, June 1, 2017

Good Samaritan Society Preparation begins again --June 1, 2017

Since mum and dad were cooking up a storm at their place I am going to get gifts. This is good as younger boy only had a grilled cheese sandwich for lunch. I have nothing ready for supper so the food handout is coming at a good time.
It is getting really nice outside. I thought it was going to rain but it hasn't happened yet. I put the clothes out to dry and they're almost all dry.
The garden is a big mess. There are ants everywhere. They are making massive colonies and I am tempted to call in the pest control folks.
Since I have to get Helva's door latch replaced this Saturday I might as well muddle about in the garden. If I hack through the overgrowth and dig out the ant colonies things might be a bit nicer in the garden. At least I won't be subject to ten million ants moving dirt over the sides of the raised beds.
The rhubarb is hatching more limbs. There may be enough to put into the dal soon.
Well it is almost time to take Rebecca back to the Villa. I will get her POC and stroller in the van and have her in rush hour traffic soon.
I have my list of readings to do for the lawsuit and will begin that job as soon as I am back home again.
Most of this lawsuit is placid time where you sit around waiting for the next step in the retribution process. Occasionally, the folks who are suing me follow the risk management process of the Good Samaritan Society which involves successive steps I guess.
In any case, there isn't much I can do about the retribution business since I am not the government of Alberta and since the politicians prefer mummies get sued to shut us up.
Meanwhile in that case in Ontario we had families who also yapped but their family members could not be saved.
Sometimes folks you have to speak since the provincial governments all over Canada provide no oversight and folks die in the continuing care system as indicated in this case.
BREAKING
Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer pleads guilty to 8 counts of 1st-degree murder
Tells court she injected victims in long-term care homes with insulin with the intent to kill
By Kate Dubinski, Kerry McKee, CBC News Posted: Jun 01, 2017 10:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jun 01, 2017 11:39 AM ET
Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer, who admits killing eight people in long-term care homes, says in court today that she injected patients with insulin with the intention…
CBC.CA


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/wettlaufer-court-nurse-killings-plead-guilty-1.4140973




BREAKING

Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer pleads guilty to 8 counts of 1st-degree murder

Tells court she injected victims in long-term care homes with insulin with the intent to kill

By Kate Dubinski, Kerry McKee, CBC News Posted: Jun 01, 2017 10:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jun 01, 2017 11:39 AM ET
Former nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer enters Woodstock's Superior Court of Justice Thursday morning.
Former nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer enters Woodstock's Superior Court of Justice Thursday morning. (Martin Trainor/CBC )
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Former Woodstock, Ont., nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer has pleaded guilty to eight first-degree murder charges, making her one of Canada's worst serial killers.
Wettlaufer also pleaded guilty to four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault in the Superior Court of Justice in Woodstock.
"You realize that first-degree murder is punishable with life in prison?" Justice Bruce Thomas asked Wettlaufer.
"Yes, your honour," she answered.
Wettlaufer stood up straight and spoke clearly and concisely as she pleaded guilty to the charges.
She confirmed that she was not intoxicated by drugs or alcohol while injecting victims with insulin with the intent to kill.
"You knew this could be fatal?" Thomas asked Wettlaufer.
"Yes, your honour," she answered.
Later today court will be shown a video confession made by Wettlaufer, which runs longer than two hours.
Family members in Wettlaufer court
Family members of Elizabeth Wettlaufer's victims arrive at the Woodstock courthouse on Thursday. (Kerry McKee/CBC News)
Family members have been told to prepare for a long, tough day in court as the onetime nurse was expected to plead guilty to charges stemming from her time at homes in Woodstock, Paris, and London, often as the registered nurse overseeing the night shifts.
Wettlaufer, now 49, was charged with murder, as well as four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault, last fall. All the incidents, in three Ontario communities, allegedly occurred between 2007 and 2014.
"She will be telling us why and how, and we will all know the final moments of our loved one's lives," Susan Horvath, the daughter of Arpad Horvath, one of the seniors Wettlaufer is charged with killing, said before Thursday's hearing.
Horvath told reporters outside court that Wettlaufer will also reveal her motive, and a "long video" would be shown to the court.
Each charge will be dealt with separately, Horvath said.
"There are so many counts and so many people. They'll be going through every one individually."
On Wednesday evening, family members met with the Crown and were told Wettlaufer was expected to plead guilty, but there was a slight possibility she could change her mind.
Wettlaufer's mother, Hazel Parker, told CBC News her daughter has asked that her parents not be in court for her appearance Thursday. They instead were planning to speak to her Wednesday night by telephone from the Vanier Centre for Women in Milton, Ont.
Follow our reporters live from court:
Parker said her daughter has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and is receiving medication.
"What has been lost in the media is that had Beth not come forward, police never would have known any of this. She's dealing with this the best she can," Parker said.
Media outlets were told Wednesday in an email from the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General that "significant developments in this case are anticipated tomorrow."
PlayPoster of video clip
Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer: 'She was such a nice person'
The National
JUMP TO BEGINNING OF THE TRACK WATCH
ADJUST VOLUME
00:00 02:39
SHARE FULLSCREEN
Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer: 'She was such a nice person'2:39
Wettlaufer waived her right to a preliminary hearing in April and instead opted to go straight to trial.
The families of those Wettlauffer killed were told their victim impact statements will likely be read in court June 26 and June 27. Typically, victim impact statements are entered on the day of sentencing.


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