Friday, June 2, 2017

- Dr. F. A. Corbett was a Regina physician who was commissioned in 1920 and 1922 by the infamous Duncan Campbell Scott serving as deputy superintendent of the Department of Indian Affairs to visit the schools and report to Scott his findings. At the Ermineskin school in Hobbema, Alberta, Canada, Corbett found 50% of the children had tuberculosis. At Sarcee Boarding School near Calgary, all 33 students were, "Much below even a passable standard of health" and, "All but four were infected with tuberculosis." In one classroom, he found 16 ill children, many near death who were being made to sit through lessons. Corbett wrote, "In a condition bad in the extreme", ...and were fighting a losing battle with this disease". Corbett expected that their health would deteriorate further through the winter when the children "were kept more closely housed". Within the classroom as the lesson progressed, Corbett reported that, "Sixteen of the children had suppurating glands or, open ulcers and, many sit at their desks with unsightly bandages around their necks to cover up their large swellings and foul smelling sores. They might not live for long, but it seemed that the Principal was determined that, with slate and chalk in hand, the children would die on the road to civilization." ...In the infirmary, Corbett found a child who would not move much farther down that road: "The condition of one little girl found in the infirmary is pitiable indeed. She lies curled up in a bed that is filthy, in a room that is untidy, dirty and dilapidated, in the northwest corner of the building with no provision of balcony, sunshine or fresh air. Both sides of her neck and chest are swollen and five foul ulcers are discovered when we lift the bandages. This gives her pain and tears, from her fear of being touched, intensifies the picture of her misery..." Superintendant Duncan Campbell Scott went on to prevent, "even the simplest effective efforts to deal with the health problems of the Indians along modern scientific lines", owing to Scott's, "active opposition...no action was taken by the department to give effect to the recommendations made". Dr Corbett's 1920 and 1922 visits to the boarding schools in effect, went over the same ground that Peter Henderson Bryce had years earlier covered in 1907 & 1909. Dr Corbett found little had changed since Peter Henderson Bryce's stunning final 1922 report and expose of the schools that was entitled, "The Story of a National Crime", It remains a damning report and one that if not for government suppression, may have helped lead to changes, to potentially prevent the further devastating death tolls of the children housed in these national factories of death. Peter Henderson Bryce's earlier 1922 report was subsequently buried and hidden by the Canadian government. In 2015 Research by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission confirmed 3,200 deaths, undoubtedly many more died, however, the records contain important gaps in the final and unknown death tolls for the Indigenous, Métis and Inuit students sent to these schools and institutions

Anthony Melting Tallow
- Dr. F. A. Corbett was a Regina physician who was commissioned in 1920 and 1922 by the infamous Duncan Campbell Scott serving as deputy superintendent of the Department of Indian Affairs to visit the schools and report to Scott his findings. At the Ermineskin school in Hobbema, Alberta, Canada, Corbett found 50% of the children had tuberculosis. At Sarcee Boarding School near Calgary, all 33 students were, "Much below even a passable standard of health" and, "All but four were infected with tuberculosis." In one classroom, he found 16 ill children, many near death who were being made to sit through lessons.
Corbett wrote, "In a condition bad in the extreme", ...and were fighting a losing battle with this disease". Corbett expected that their health would deteriorate further through the winter when the children "were kept more closely housed". Within the classroom as the lesson progressed, Corbett reported that, "Sixteen of the children had suppurating glands or, open ulcers and, many sit at their desks with unsightly bandages around their necks to cover up their large swellings and foul smelling sores.
They might not live for long, but it seemed that the Principal was determined that, with slate and chalk in hand, the children would die on the road to civilization."
...In the infirmary, Corbett found a child who would not move much farther down that road: "The condition of one little girl found in the infirmary is pitiable indeed.
She lies curled up in a bed that is filthy, in a room that is untidy, dirty and dilapidated, in the northwest corner of the building with no provision of balcony, sunshine or fresh air. Both sides of her neck and chest are swollen and five foul ulcers are discovered when we lift the bandages.
This gives her pain and tears, from her fear of being touched, intensifies the picture of her misery..."
Superintendant Duncan Campbell Scott went on to prevent, "even the simplest effective efforts to deal with the health problems of the Indians along modern scientific lines",
owing to Scott's, "active opposition...no action was taken by the department to give effect to the recommendations made". Dr Corbett's 1920 and 1922 visits to the boarding schools in effect, went over the same ground that Peter Henderson Bryce had years earlier covered in 1907 & 1909.
Dr Corbett found little had changed since Peter Henderson Bryce's stunning final 1922 report and expose of the schools that was entitled, "The Story of a National Crime", It remains a damning report and one that if not for government suppression, may have helped lead to changes, to potentially prevent the further devastating death tolls of the children housed in these national factories of death.
Peter Henderson Bryce's earlier 1922 report was subsequently buried and hidden by the Canadian government.
In 2015 Research by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission confirmed 3,200 deaths,
undoubtedly many more died, however, the records contain important gaps in the final and unknown death tolls for the Indigenous, Métis and Inuit students sent to these schools and institutions
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Julie Ali So utterly disgusting.

ReplyJust now
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