Tuesday, June 13, 2017

-Alberta’s ongoing long-term care crisis During the 2015 election, the NDP promised to open 2,000 public long-term care beds by the end of 2019, including 500 new beds in 2015. An October 2016 report from Parkland Institute shows that “the newly elected NDP government failed to deliver on its commitment to open 500 long-term spaces in 2015” (page 12). The report also explains that the NDP’s promise of 2,000 long-term care beds is much too small to address Alberta’s long-term care crisis.-------------Julie Ali Maybe the Friends of Medicare need to focus less on the Parkland Institute and more on this Auditor General report: http://www.oag.ab.ca/.../rep.../Better_Healthcare_Report.pd

https://www.oag.ab.ca/

Better Healthcare for Albertans: A Report by the Office of the Auditor General of Alberta
There is nothing more important to each one of us than our own health and the health of our families.
 
Healthcare is the biggest and most important service the government provides to Albertans.
 
Albertans are paying for the most expensive healthcare system per capita of any province in Canada, yet we are not receiving the level of care provided by the best performing health systems in other jurisdictions.
 
We have some of the best medical professionals in the world, and many of the building blocks are in place to create a better and more integrated system of care. But medical professionals and providers continue to work in administrative silos, and not around the needs of the most important participant in the system—the patient.
 
Better Healthcare for Albertans: A Report by the Office of the Auditor General of Alberta offers an analysis of the root causes behind the lack of progress toward effective integration of healthcare in Alberta. It identifies opportunities based on models from other jurisdictions to take Alberta’s health system to a higher level in a quantum leap rather than through incremental change and reorganization.
 


http://www.oag.ab.ca/webfiles/reports/Better_Healthcare_Report.pdf

Better Healthcare for Albertans: A Report by the Office of the Auditor General of Alberta

http://www.parklandinstitute.ca/the_state_of_health_care_in_alberta

Alberta’s ongoing long-term care crisis

During the 2015 election, the NDP promised to open 2,000 public long-term care beds by the end of 2019, including 500 new beds in 2015. An October 2016 report from Parkland Institute shows that “the newly elected NDP government failed to deliver on its commitment to open 500 long-term spaces in 2015” (page 12).
The report also explains that the NDP’s promise of 2,000 long-term care beds is much too small to address Alberta’s long-term care crisis. The following chart from the report illustrates that Alberta’s population of seniors 85 years of age and over nearly doubled, from 33,273 in 2001 to 61,437 in 2015, while the number of long-term care beds has flatlined over the same period.
chart5.jpg
A recent opinion poll released by Parkland Institute shows 57% of Albertans (including 73% of NDP supporters, 47% of PC supporters, and 51% of Wildrose supporters) would be willing to pay higher taxes to provide more access to long-term residential care for seniors.
While it’s encouraging that the government is adding 200 public long-term care beds in a new Calgary facility and 145 new public beds in a refurbishing of CapitalCare Norwood in Edmonton, the NDP promised an average of 500 new public beds per year in the 2015 election and they haven’t met that target in any of its three budgets.
The main challenge identified in the Ministry of Health’s 2015-16 Annual Report is Alberta’s growing population and changing demographics. The report states, “Over the past 10 years, the province’s population increased at an annual growth rate of 2.6 per cent; and, by 2031, one in five Albertans will be 65 years of age or older” (page 17).
Based on that demographic forecast, it is clear that Alberta’s long-term care crisis is going to get much worse in the coming years unless the province immediately commits to making significant capital investments to build thousands of new public long-term care beds. The long-term care crisis didn’t appear overnight in Alberta and it will take years of consistent, large capital investments in new public facilities to even begin to address the crisis let alone solve it.
http://www.parklandinstitute.ca/the_state_of_health_care_in_alberta

The state of health care in Alberta



Two years into NDP's term and the state of health care in Alberta - a great analysis by Ian Hussey of the Parkland Institute. -
Parkland Institute
May 12
At the halfway mark of the NDP's term, Parkland Institute's Ian Hussey compares the current and previous PC governments on the state of health care and health care spending in Alberta.
At the halfway mark of the NDP's term, Parkland Institute researcher Ian Hussey compares the current and previous PC governments on the state of health care and health care spending in Alberta.
PARKLANDINSTITUTE.CA
Comments
Julie Ali Maybe the Friends of Medicare need to focus less on the Parkland Institute and more on this Auditor General report: http://www.oag.ab.ca/.../rep.../Better_Healthcare_Report.pdf
Reply8 mins
Julie Ali It would also be useful if the Friends of Medicare reported on the continuation of PC error problems in the continuing care system such as the non-compliances at the AHS run long term care facility in Lacombe; if the AHS run facilities are badly run then why would we expect private providers to be any different? http://www.wildrose.ca/leaked_documents_highlight_serious...
Reply6 minsEdited
Julie Ali https://www.oag.ab.ca/
Better Healthcare for Albertans: A Report by the Office of the Auditor General of Alberta
There is nothing more important to each one of us than our own health and the health of our families.


Healthcare is the biggest and most important service the government provides to Albertans.

Albertans are paying for the most expensive healthcare system per capita of any province in Canada, yet we are not receiving the level of care provided by the best performing health systems in other jurisdictions.

We have some of the best medical professionals in the world, and many of the building blocks are in place to create a better and more integrated system of care. But medical professionals and providers continue to work in administrative silos, and not around the needs of the most important participant in the system—the patient.

Better Healthcare for Albertans: A Report by the Office of the Auditor General of Alberta offers an analysis of the root causes behind the lack of progress toward effective integration of healthcare in Alberta. It identifies opportunities based on models from other jurisdictions to take Alberta’s health system to a higher level in a quantum leap rather than through incremental change and reorganization.

Read the Report
Reply4 mins

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