Monday, May 29, 2017

-#Weasling--Jordan’s Principle is named after Jordan Anderson, a five-year-old boy who died in hospital in 2005 while Ottawa and Manitoba squabbled over which government should cover the medical costs of moving him to foster care.-The feds’ weaseling violates both the letter and the spirit of the principle. In its latest ruling, the tribunal makes clear that this failure may have cost lives.-------------Last January, the Human Rights Tribunal ruled that Ottawa was failing in its legal duty to apply Jordan’s Principle, which says that no First Nations child should be denied welfare services due to jurisdictional disputes. Three months later, the tribunal found the feds still had not taken action and issued a compliance order. In October, it issued a second.-------The federal government has spent nearly $1 million defending itself against these tribunal complaints over the last year. It lost every time. If Justin Trudeau means what he says about building a new relationship with Indigenous peoples, he should start doing less to defend his government and more to defend the First Nations children it has for too long let down.--------

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Julie Ali I think the term Weasling sums this junk up best.
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11 hrs
Wolfpaws Yukon Territories Trudeau is a disgrace
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Julie Ali Stephen Harper 2.0
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Here is the baloney from the Liberal Party:


Julie --
I hope you'll take a couple of moments to read this and take a look at what's ahead with me.
We've accomplished a lot together over the past couple of years as a movement, but we still have more work to do. In the months ahead, we need to work as hard as we did during the last election campaign – to make sure that Canada's success is felt by more and more of Canada's middle class.
Like the single mom who shouldn't have to decide which of her children she can afford to send to summer camp.
Or the high school student who needs a good summer job, so that she can save up for next year's college tuition.
Or the senior citizen who has worked so hard for so long, and has earned a secure and dignified retirement.
Can I count on you to be part of this work too?
Julie, as we look ahead, we also have to remember one very important thing: we now know who our competition is – and all of our progress for a stronger middle class is at stake.
Leadership contests are a chance to connect with more Canadians, to welcome new and returning members, and to raise funds for the next election.
The Conservative Party just elected Andrew Scheer as their new permanent leader.
The NDP will be choosing theirs later this year.
And history has shown that these things matter. We need to be ready for the months ahead.
Julie, we can't afford to sit back and say, "I'll wait and make a donation in 2019," or "I'll volunteer when we get a bit closer to the election."
We need to be working hard now, too.
Your donation will make sure that we can continue to deliver real change for Canadians for many years to come.
I hope I can count on you.
Give $5 ➜

Give $30 ➜

Give $50 ➜

Give $100 ➜

Or give another amount:
Thank you.
Justin Trudeau
Justin Trudeau
Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada
And here is the reality of their poor performance.

Failed governance in Harper 2.0.
Mr. Trudeau is turning out to be like Mr. Harper in wasting public dollars on legal matters while failing to pony up the money for disabled First Nations children. Why is Team Trudeau now Team Harper?
I'm guessing that there is no difference between the Conservatives and the Liberals. Both parties represent the elite. And as disabled First Nations kids don't belong to the elite well they simply get screwed.

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Velvet Martin
 shared a link to the group: Protecting Canadian Children.
1 hr


If Justin Trudeau means what he says about building a new relationship with Indigenous peoples, he should start doing less to defend his government and more…
THESTAR.COM

Sad
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Julie Ali It will take brains.

Reply8 mins

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2017/05/29/what-will-it-take-for-ottawa-finally-to-tackle-indigenous-child-welfare-crisis-editorial.html#

What will it take for Ottawa finally to tackle Indigenous child-welfare crisis?: Editorial

If Justin Trudeau means what he says about building a new relationship with Indigenous peoples, he should start doing less to defend his government and more to defend the First Nations children it has for too long let down.
Last week, the Human Rights Tribunal ruled yet again that the government of Justin Trudeau, despite its lofty talk of Indigenous reconciliation, continues to violate its legal duty to First Nations children.
Last week, the Human Rights Tribunal ruled yet again that the government of Justin Trudeau, despite its lofty talk of Indigenous reconciliation, continues to violate its legal duty to First Nations children.  (DAVID BOILY / LA PRESSE)  
Mon., May 29, 2017




When the chief of the Wapekeka First Nation discovered last summer that several children in the community had struck a suicide pact, he contacted the federal government and asked for help.
Ottawa submitted the request to a complex bureaucratic assessment process, which was not yet complete when, six months later, two 12-year-old girls from Wapekeka, Jolynn Winter and Chantel Fox, fulfilled their pact and killed themselves.
The government’s lethargy in this case, and in so many others where Indigenous children in crisis are asked to wait as officials wind themselves up in red tape and jurisdictional disputes, is not only a shameful moral failure, it’s also illegal.
Last January, the Human Rights Tribunal ruled that Ottawa was failing in its legal duty to apply Jordan’s Principle, which says that no First Nations child should be denied welfare services due to jurisdictional disputes. Three months later, the tribunal found the feds still had not taken action and issued a compliance order. In October, it issued a second.
Last week, the tribunal ruled yet again that the Trudeau government, despite its lofty talk of Indigenous reconciliation, continues to break the law. Otherwise, the tribunal concluded, the Wapekeka girls might still be alive.
Jordan’s Principle is named after Jordan Anderson, a five-year-old boy who died in hospital in 2005 while Ottawa and Manitoba squabbled over which government should cover the medical costs of moving him to foster care. Such disputes are disturbingly common and have contributed to a persistent inequity in the provision of child-welfare services to First Nations communities, where the need is often greatest. Jordan’s Principle seeks to redress this injustice.
The tribunal has been perfectly clear that the principle, which was adopted into law in 2007, applies to all First Nations children in all jurisdictional disputes. The department from which a service is first sought must provide that service; it can seek remuneration from other governments or departments later.
Yet Ottawa has again and again tried to narrow the definition, claiming the principle applies only to children on reserves or living with a disability or dealing with a critical short-term condition. The feds’ weaseling violates both the letter and the spirit of the principle. In its latest ruling, the tribunal makes clear that this failure may have cost lives.
In response, the government issued a statement pointing to its commitment to spend $382.5 million over three years to comply with Jordan’s Principle and said it would be “carefully reviewing” the tribunal’s decision. What it didn’t do was commit to immediately and fully apply the principle. The promised money is no doubt welcome, but 17 months and three compliance orders after the original tribunal ruling, anything less than a clear commitment to abide by the law is unacceptable.
The tribunal has attributed the delay to bureaucratic sclerosis rather than lack of political will. But surely political will, if strong enough, can spur change in even the most change-resistant bureaucracy.
The federal government has spent nearly $1 million defending itself against these tribunal complaints over the last year. It lost every time. If Justin Trudeau means what he says about building a new relationship with Indigenous peoples, he should start doing less to defend his government and more to defend the First Nations children it has for too long let down.
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No one cares about the most vulnerable citizens in government. Sure they talk a good talk and then make these feeble attempts at helping but what really is done?
There are sessions with the public, some chatter and then the deliverables are what?
I see this sort of spin everywhere and I have just concluded that government is here to simply act on behalf of the most powerful among us-the elite while the children, the youth, seniors and the handicapped get stomped on.
In other words government is unfair, knows it is unfair, is unwilling to change and yet talks compulsively about change.
It's a problem.
And I doubt that Team Trudeau for all their chatter will do anything. It's just Harper all over again.
Meanwhile in Alberta we have the NDP spinning like the PCs before them about dead kids in the foster care system and you wonder to yourself why is it that these folks can hand over $235 million to big oil -no questions asked to pay for an orphan well program that big oil should be paying for while over 800 kids are now dead in the child welfare system?
You gotta wonder.
And then think, it's all about the elite.


If Justin Trudeau means what he says about building a new relationship with Indigenous peoples, he should start doing less to defend his government and more…
THESTAR.COM

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