Thursday, May 11, 2017

-Protest for change! We demand our children be safe!---------Troy Taylor Yesterday at 12:17pm · Edmonton, AB Hi all. Friday May 19th at 2:00pm I will be at the government building in Edmonton,seated in a chair with only a sign, in silence such as the voices of our little babies suffering from abuse without protection. Join me! Also,feel free to contact the local media and news to let them know about this protest. I'll be doing so as well. The more pressure,the better. Join me. Love Like Love Thankful Haha Wow Sad Angry Share




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Hi all.
Friday May 19th at 2:00pm I will be at the government building in Edmonton,seated in a chair with only a sign, in silence such as the voices of our little babies suffering from abuse without protection. Join me! Also,feel free to contact the local media and news to let them know about this protest. I'll be doing so as well. The more pressure,the better.
Join me.

Love

Velvet Martin
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Edmonton
Decision to leave children in home after Serenity's death indefensible: lawyer
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Children should never be allowed to live in the same home where a little girl named Serenity suffered fatal injuries, says an Alberta child welfare expert.
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It is pretty clear to me that the folks in the government of Alberta lack common sense as well as any sort of feeling for the children in the child welfare system. Both the PCs and the NDPCs talk a fine talk and sew a fine seam but the emperors of bitumen aren't wearing any clothes.
We're the ones who have to do the work government is not doing. A rally to protest the junk that is going on is long overdue. We need families to come out to the government place and protest. This probably won't change anything but at least we haven't stayed silent and cowed.


I have to say it does not seem logical to take away Serenity and her siblings from this home and then leave the other six children in the same place. We have the case of Serenity who was underweight for some odd reason and had all the signs of abuse and yet the government of Alberta is bleating to us that this still doesn't mean that the other six children are at risk? What the heck is wrong with the folks at the GOA? Would they want their own beloved children in this home? I doubt it.
So if they would not want their own babies in this home why would they leave six other children to the fate of Serenity? It's simply illogical. And not only is it illogical it is also a problem in terms of liability in my opinion. The children should hire a lawyer and sue the government for failing to provide protection for them. It's a farce in the GOA and we're stuck with these folks all the way until the end of the dinosaur error of the PCs and the NDPCs. Will the Wildrose be different? I imagine they won't be. But at least we will change the politicians who smile and try hard to contain their amusement at the questions from Ric McIver who spoke to the Premier about the case and got the rebuttal that it was under the PC watch that these problems occurred. Well so what? It's now under the NDPCs watch that we have six kids in an unsafe home. Get going Ms. Notley. Explain that.

Children should never be allowed to live in the same home where a little girl named Serenity suffered fatal injuries, says an Alberta child welfare expert.
CBC.CA


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/decision-leave-children-in-serenity-home-indefensible-calgary-lawyer-1.4110378

Decision to leave children in home after Serenity's death indefensible: lawyer

'I want justice for my daughter, but I also want justice for the all the other kids,' says Serenity's mom

By Wallis Snowdon, CBC News Posted: May 11, 2017 12:00 PM MT Last Updated: May 11, 2017 2:20 PM MT
Serenity was four years old when she died of severe head trauma in an Edmonton hospital.
Serenity was four years old when she died of severe head trauma in an Edmonton hospital. (Supplied)
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Danielle Larivee says media has 'misinformation' about Serenity case
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Danielle Larivee responds to latest revelations in Serenity case
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Wallis Snowdon
Wallis Snowdon is a digital journalist with CBC Edmonton. She has nearly a decade of experience reporting behind her. Originally from New Brunswick, her journalism career has taken her from Nova Scotia to Fort McMurray. Share your stories with Wallis at wallis.snowdon@cbc.ca

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Children should never be allowed to live in the same home where a little girl named Serenity suffered fatal injuries, says an Alberta child welfare expert.
"They all should have been automatically removed, immediately. There shouldn't have been unequal treatment of the children," said Diann Castle, a Calgary-based lawyer specializing in family law.
"Why would we say the house was unfit to care for three children and leave the other children in it? It's just unexplainable. There is no explanation for such a conduct."
Serenity was four years old when she died of acute head trauma. She weighed only 18 pounds. Her skull was fractured and her body was covered in lacerations and purple contusions. Her body also showed signs of sexual assault.
Before her death in September 2014, the little girl was living with relatives on a central Alberta reserve in a foster care arrangement under the kinship care program.
But when she was still clinging to life in Edmonton hospital, custody of Serenity and her two siblings was transferred back their biological mother. The two siblings were apprehended from the home.
However, other children in the home — up to six grandchildren of the former foster parents —  stayed behind.  
The circumstances of Serenity's death remain under investigation by RCMP.

'History will repeat itself'

The decision to leave the remaining children in the home is indefensible, Castle believes.
"I have certainly no understanding as to why that would happen, particularly with respect to the horrific circumstances that led to Serenity and her siblings being removed from the home," said Castle, who described the situation as appalling. "I was appalled by the facts of this case.
"It would seem to me that history will repeat itself and it's not a safe home for any child living there."
Children's Services Minister Danielle Larivee has said there is no evidence of abuse against the remaining children, and she reiterated that statement Thursday.


She said the province needs clear evidence that a child has been abused before they can been apprehended.
"Obviously, if there was evidence of abuse of a specific child, apprehension would happen. That's what we're here for, to keep the children safe and we're continuing to prioritise their safety."
Larivee said critics of the government response do not have all of the facts, but she declined to provide new information on the case.
She said the ministry is still consulting their lawyers to see if any new details can be made public.
"I understand the frustration that people have with not having those details," she said.
"I would love to disclose all those details. Unfortunately that's not in the best interest of the children involved ... but, in the meantime, I'm confident that we've done everything we can to protect the safety of those children."
The minister said biological children cannot be removed from homes simply because a criminal investigation is underway.
Serenity
This photo of Serenity, taken by her mother, shows how thin the four-year-old had become. She died several days after this photo was taken in September 2014. (Supplied)
Castle said the legal threshold for apprehending children has been met in this case. The Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act dictates children can be removed from the home if there is a probable risk that they will be exposed to neglect, emotional, physical or sexual abuse. Guardians unable or unwilling to provide the necessaries of life, or adequately protect children from harm can also be deemed unfit.
In the 30 years she's worked in the field, Castle has dealt with dozens of cases where children were apprehended from the home for the mere suspicion of child abuse.
"If you have a history of abuse, and you go give birth to a baby at the Foothills [Medical Centre], they will apprehend that baby immediately and you will not get that child back," she said.
Castle believes the kinship care program is struggling to meet its mandate to help place apprehended Indigenous children in safe homes with blood relatives. The reserve-based system is overtaxed and underfunded, and not as reactive as it should be to suspected cases of abuse or neglect, she said.

'I'm just going to keep fighting'

The program operates under the same set of legal restrictions as standard child welfare programs, but there is bureaucratic apathy and bias which makes these children more vulnerable, Castle claims.
"The standards are different and no one says it aloud and maybe I shouldn't be saying it out loud … but there's a difference," Castle said, speaking to her experience in the courtroom. "There are problems and the children suffer for it."
Larivee said workers with the designated First Nations agency were in contact with the family Wednesday. She repeated her statement that the well-being of the children who remain in the home is regularly monitored but said privacy legislation prevents her from saying how often.
"It just seems like they don't care," Serenity's biological mother said Thursday. "Serenity and my other kids that are still alive have suffered serious, serious abuse in that home," she claims.
Frustrated with the government response, Serenity's mother wants to keep her daughter's case in the spotlight. She's helping to organize a rally at the Alberta legislature next Friday calling on the government to investigate failures in the child welfare system.
"I want justice for my daughter, but I also want justice for the all the other kids that are still suffering," she said.
"I'm just going to keep fighting."

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