Sunday, May 7, 2017

Raymond Stelmashuk says for the past few days, the city has been dumping piles of sand two kilometres away from his grandmother's home, asking residents to fill and move their own bags. "I made and moved 600 bags, between 600 and 650 bags," he says, standing on the flooded streets of the western tip of Pierrefonds-Roxboro, a hard-hit borough in Montreal's West Island. As he looks at the flooded home his late grandfather built from a one-season fishing shack, Stelmashuk starts to cry.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/montreal-pierrefonds-flood-1.4103807

Grandson fills 600 sandbags, but can't save home for grandmother, 93

Montreal mayor insists there is no shortage of sandbags in borough of Pierrefonds-Roxboro

By Jaela Bernstien, CBC News Posted: May 07, 2017 4:04 PM ET Last Updated: May 07, 2017 6:43 PM ET
Raymond Stelmashuk says if the borough had been more supportive, his 93-year-old grandmother might have been able to keep the home her husband built from a fishing shack.
Raymond Stelmashuk says if the borough had been more supportive, his 93-year-old grandmother might have been able to keep the home her husband built from a fishing shack. (Jaela Bernstien/CBC)
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Jaela Bernstien
Jaela Bernstien is a journalist with CBC Montreal.

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Raymond Stelmashuk says for the past few days, the city has been dumping piles of sand two kilometres away from his grandmother's home, asking residents to fill and move their own bags.
"I made and moved 600 bags, between 600 and 650 bags," he says, standing on the flooded streets of the western tip of Pierrefonds-Roxboro, a hard-hit borough in Montreal's West Island.
As he looks at the flooded home his late grandfather built from a one-season fishing shack, Stelmashuk starts to cry.
'People aren't sleeping, people are losing everything and they're worried about getting their feet wet.'- Raymond Stelmashuk
The house has shifted off its foundation because of the floodwaters and may not be salvageable.
He's had a sleepless week, like many of his neighbours, racing to save their homes by buying sandbags or renting pumps to fight the rising water.
But it was all for nothing.
On Sunday, Stelmashuk said the home, at the end of Gouin Boulevard West, near the L'Anse-à-l'Orme nature park, was a total loss.
Flooded pierrefonds-roxboro home
Stelmashuk says the home shifted off its foundation, and to save it they’d likely have to spend well over $100,000. (Jaela Bernstien/CBC)
He says the fire department and authorities drive by multiple times a day, but they're not stopping to help.
"There's not a city person around, nobody's around. They keep coming and going, but they're not helping anybody."
At first the city pitched in, Stelmashuk says, but as the flooding worsened the support dwindled.
Earlier this week, six borough employees for Pierrefonds-Roxboro came by in a pickup truck with a single pallet of sand, he says.
"They didn't want to get their feet wet, so they asked where to put it as close as possible to their truck. Which is ridiculous," he says.
"People aren't sleeping, people are losing everything and they're worried about getting their feet wet."
Stelmashuk and his family were finally forced to move his 93-year-old grandmother out of her home.
"My grandfather built the house … This shouldn't be happening and the city should be way more organized."
Flooded home Gouin West
This picture was taken on Saturday, when the water inside was inching up towards the floorboards. Stelmashuk says by Sunday morning water was gushing through the home. (Jaela Bernstien/CBC)
The house overlooks the L'Anse-à-l'Orme bay, but normally there's a safe barrier of grassy fields between the backyard and the water.
'There is no issue in Pierrefonds of lack of sandbags.'- Denis Coderre, Montreal mayor
But now the water floods past the fields, into the yard, through the house and into the street in front.
Stelmashuk believes that if the city had called on the military for extra help earlier, they could have saved the home.
The hardest part, he says, is what the loss will mean for his grandmother.
"She thinks she's coming back too. That's the hard part. She actually thinks she's coming back, but she's not."



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Julie Ali
  • Julie Ali
A very sad story. His poor grandmother will have such a hard time going through the transition period. Such a stressful situation for this family and others.
  • 2 minutes ago
Kuock Gheng
  • Kuock Gheng
"...."There's not a city person around, nobody's around. They keep coming and going, but they're not helping anybody."....." 

From my understanding, that's what happens to every single of us when natural disaster hits anytime, exactly like Katrina at New Orleans ... NOBODY will stop by your house to help you, man, if you are not VIP or superstar of the country. 

Stop all the false hope and get ready ...
  • 52 minutes ago
Lieschen Mueller
  • Lieschen Mueller
The grandson should be proud, the city employees who did not want to get their precious toes wet, not so much!
  • 52 minutes ago
Ryan Johnson (Nibiroo Azimuth)
  • Ryan Johnson (Nibiroo Azimuth)
Can we start talking about Planet X Nibiru and the pending Polehshift yet? The azimuth of the Sun is insane! It's not rising or setting in the right spot. Our poles are shifting, our planet is wobbling, sending our Jet Streams into erratic disarray. Montreal can only cloud and fog their skies with the elite's disgusting chemtrails and sky obscuration for so long! Montreal is projected to be underwater soon!
  • 52 minutes ago
Mike Davis
  • Mike Davis
You did your best bud, for whatever that is worth. Best wishes to You and Granny.
  • 1 hour ago
Chris Goetz
  • Chris Goetz
Bless his heart for working so hard to save his grandmothers house. Sad to see his efforts didn't pay off.
  • 1 hour ago
Ture Gustafson
  • Ture Gustafson
I was volunteering today in pierrefonds filling sandbags, and let me tell you, there were shortages and delays getting bags. 
but, the blue collar city workers who are putting in 85-90 hour workweeks are not to blame, perhaps the organizational skills of some of the management could be questioned. 

you have to understand, though, the army and city have to triage what can be saved, and what's already a total loss. they are not going to spend energy where it would be wasted. 
their priority is people's safety.« less
  • 1 hour ago
Mike Smart
  • Mike Smart
I live in Toronto, and I was hit hard in the July 8 2013 storm that hit Toronto. I had just over 3 feet of sewage in my basement. I frantically fought the water but so much water came in so quickly, even with pumps running(from a backup generator, because we lost power as soon as the storm hit) all was lost in less than 3 hours.With only $15,000 worth of sewer backup insurance that was only enough to pay for a new furnace and washer/dryer and few other things. I had to do all the cleanup myself with help occasionally from a student neighbour I paid. I too found the government and city workers did virtually nothing to help. It took until September and 5 dumpsters later to demolish and clean my basement(I had never been so tired) and then another 2 years to rebuild the basement that was very costly to do. This was as well as the huge amount of contents that was damaged or ruined by the sewage, some of which I tried to salvage(very time consuming cleaning) seeing I did not have the insurance to replace these items. It was a nightmare from the first hour of that storm all the way through until 2016, I would never want to go through it again. I really feel for the people across Canada that are having these terrible floods this spring.I think unless you have gone through a disaster personally you cannot fully comprehend the feelings of the victims,I feel your complete exhaustion, the awful sense of anxiety of when will it end, and the terrible sense of loss while trying to battle to save anything you can. I hope the red cross starts fundraising (like last summer for Fort McMurray) where like last year I will give them a generous donation to help my fellow Canadians going through this terrible ordeal.« less
  • 1 hour ago
Julie Ali
  • Julie Ali
@Mike Smart Sounds like you went through hell. I've wondered about the sewer backup insurance and it sounds like it is completely inadequate. 
 I can't imagine how you went through this horror from 2013 to 2016--it must have been really traumatic. My sympathies.
  • 3 minutes ago
Edward Woodward
  • Edward Woodward
Commendable effort Raymond but here is some advice: change your family name to one of Middle Eastern origins and you`ll receive aid and compensation from all levels of government, immediately.
  • 2 hours ago
Julie Ali
This comment is awaiting moderation by the site administrators.
  • Julie Ali
@Edward Woodward Dumb remark but I guess you had to put in the Islamophobia comment in first.
  • 6 minutes ago
Maggie Yfe
  • Maggie Yfe
@Edward Woodward NOT true....and not even relevant to this tragedy!

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