Monday, May 15, 2017

In July 2016, Merwan Saher reported that only 16 per cent of Alberta’s child welfare case workers are complying with provincial rules that require them to make personal contact on a regular basis with the foster children they supervise.


If only 16% of child welfare case workers are making regular personal contact with the children in their care then it seems clear to me that there will be problems in oversight. I mean most parents are providing contact with the kids they have in home so why not the public parent of the government of Alberta?
If case workers aren't trained to do their work then they need to be upgraded. If more education is required this should be done. And if this is about not enough time (i.e. more money is required) then I guess the GOA will have to put up the money.
If there is money for everything else like the dumb climate leadership plan that is a wash because you can't convince me that putting a carbon tax on all of us and then returning the money to most of us will result in a change in behaviour--well if there is money for spin of this magnitude then there is money for our most vulnerable children in Alberta.
Unless of course the money is to be used for other useless projects like the propping up of alternate health programs of dubious benefits to the populace of the Pure North type. http://www.cbc.ca/…/alberta-health-carl-amrhein-pure-north-…
CBC INVESTIGATES
Alberta Health deputy minister lobbied for funding for private health foundation
Carl Amrhein advocated for Pure North while with Alberta Health Services
By Charles Rusnell, Jennie Russell, CBC News Posted: May 11, 2017 7:00 AM MT Last Updated: May 11, 2017 11:09 AM MT


http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/first-nations-health-leader-added-to-alberta-child-intervention-panel


First Nations health leader added to Alberta child intervention panel

Published on: May 8, 2017 | Last Updated: May 8, 2017 3:51 PM MDT
Members of the public in attendance at the Alberta government's new Child Intervention Panel held at Government House in Edmonton on February 1, 2017.
Members of the public in attendance at the Alberta government's new Child Intervention Panel held at Government House in Edmonton on February 1, 2017. LARRY WONG / PHOTO BY LARRY WONG/POSTMEDIA
A provincial panel examining Alberta’s child death review and intervention system has added a local First Nations health leader to its ranks.
Tyler White, CEO of Siksika Health Services and president of First Nations Health Consortium, will join 11 MLAs and three experts on the Ministerial Panel on Child Intervention.
The all-party panel was launched in February to streamline Alberta’s child death review process and find ways to improve the child intervention system, following a scathing report last year from the auditor general.
In July 2016, Merwan Saher reported that only 16 per cent of Alberta’s child welfare case workers are complying with provincial rules that require them to make personal contact on a regular basis with the foster children they supervise.
Also, Saher and youth advocate Del Graff both released reports showing a vast over-representation of indigenous kids in the system.
With the panel wrapping up work on the child death review and turning its attention to child intervention, it decided it needed aboriginal expertise.

RELATED

“It’s a tragic reality that indigenous children are overrepresented in Alberta’s child intervention system. We can and must do better,” said Danielle Larivee, minister of Children’s Services. “We have heard from leaders and community members that we need to bolster First Nations perspectives on the panel.”
White has more than 19 years experience in First Nations health care, including as co-chair of the Joint Action Health Plan and as a member of the Alberta Mental Health Review Panel.
The Ministerial Panel on Child Intervention will review legislation, policies, data and past recommendations, including those from the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate and the Auditor General of Alberta. It’s expected to make recommendations later this year.
mjarvie@postmedia.com



Julie Ali · 
If the child welfare workers aren't making contact with the children in their care then how do they know the children are safe? Do they just assume that if the children are alive-- that they must be fine?

http://calgaryherald.com/.../first-nations-health-leader...

In July 2016, Merwan Saher reported that only 16 per cent of Alberta’s child welfare case workers are complying with provincial rules that require them to make personal contact on a regular basis with the foster children they supervise.
*******
What happens then when a child dies? Does the case worker's work get reviewed to find out why there were no regular face to face meetings to ensure the child's safety?

Does anyone in government actually get in trouble at any time for any failure in performance? I am also curious how it is possible to have government make rules that most of the workers don't follow. Why bother to make the rules in the first place?
LikeReplyJust now
Why even bother to make rules requiring case workers to make personal contact with children they are responsible for if the majority of them aren't doing this? I mean a rule is supposed to be followed. If parents break the rules for their kids, they get penalties. Why then does the public "parent" of the government of Alberta and its agents--the child welfare case workers get off the hook for failures to follow the rules?
In this case, the contact with the kids seems to be an essential rule that we should have the public parent respect and comply with and yet only 16% of the public parent's agents complied. The rest of them? I guess they just assumed if the children under their care were alive, they were fine. Until they weren't.

A provincial panel examining Alberta’s child death review and intervention system has added a local First Nations health leader to its ranks. Tyler White, CEO of Siksika…
CALGARYHERALD.COM

Sad
Comment

Comments
Julie Ali If they aren't in contact then how do they know the kids are safe? Do they simply assume they are?

Reply
1
7 mins
Velvet Martin Correct they ASSume

Reply5 mins
Julie Ali Velvet Martin And so when a kid dies, it's still assumed that the case worker did his or her job?

Reply3 mins


s

No comments:

Post a Comment