Monday, May 8, 2017

following the money at the advocates Office-- Post # 2

I decided to look at the costs of the health advocates and compare their expense to that of Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society. Ruth Adria pays for all the costs of her work by herself. She helps families all over Alberta. We get deliverables.
Now in contrast we pay out millions of dollars for the health advocates who are not helping us because they can't help us. Their job is to move families forwards and the legislation that they operate under means that they have no power to change the problems families face in the continuing care or health care systems. So then why are we paying millions for folks to provide us with advice? Can't we just give the money to Ruth Adria and get her to do what the health advocates aren't able to do which is system wide change and legislative changes?
 Or is that the whole purpose of the health advocates? To keep citizens busy with problems that can't be solved by this office?
The millions we spend on useless advocates could be spent on real advocates like Ruth Adria.
In addition we are spending millions more on yet more useless offices such as the Protection for Persons in Care Office and the Ombudsman Office.
Instead of these fake offices why not give the money directly to the citizens who can then hire lawyers to defend themselves and their families from the system and the government itself?



Health Advocate Financial Summary 2016 Budget 2016 Actual 2015 Budget 2015 Actual Total Costs 2015-2016 Salaries ...
READINGCHILDRENSBOOKS.BLOGSPOT.COM


Health Advocate
Financial Summary
2016
Budget
2016
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Actual
Total Costs 2015-2016


Salaries and Employee Benefits
$743, 000
$ 689, 320
$ 723,000
$ 499, 373
$ 736,205
$ 655,925


Travel and Accommodations
$ 13,000
$ 6,287
-
$ 8,971



General and Administrative Services
$ 79,000
$ 40,598
$ 45,000
$ 147,581



Total
$ 835,000
$ 736,205
$ 768,000
$ 655,925



Mental Health Patient Advocate Financial Summary







Salaries and Employee Benefits
$ 746,000
$ 546,817

706,782



Travel and Accommodation
$ 14,000
$ 12,209

12,975



General and Administrative Services
$ 130,000
$ 44,940

65,007



Total
890,000
603,967

$ 784,763



Mental Health Patient Advocate Financial Summary
2014/2015
2013/2014
2012/2013
2011/2012
2010/2011
Total Costs 2010 -2014

BUDGET
$955,000
$955,000
$985,000
$934,000
$875,000
$784,763
$843,000
$834,000
$880,290
$879,971

EXPENSES
$784,763
$843,000
$834,000
$880,290
$879,971


SURPLUS
$170,237 *

*The 2013/14 surplus was in keeping with the Government of Alberta’s fiscal restraint
$112,000
$151,000
$53,710
-$4,971


Alberta Health Budget
(total)
2017
















21.4 billion
2016 Budget
(in thousands)














20,165,323
2015
Constructed Budget

(in thousands)











19,339,776

2014 Constructed Budget
(in thousands)













18,857,072
2013 Constructed Budget
(in thousands)
















16,641,824





2016 Actual
(in thousands)








20,460,025
2015 Actual
(in thousands)







19,638,955
2014 Actual


(in thousands)







18,566,985
2013 Actual
(in thousands)











16,512,348









2012 Actual
(in thousands)






15,485,218

Elder Advocates of Alberta Society





1992-2017

0




Note 3 Reporting Changes (in thousands)
Effective April 1, 2013, responsibility for the Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions was transferred to the Department of Health from the Department of Innovation and Advanced Education.


Comparatives for 2013 have been restated as if the Department had always been assigned with its current responsibilities.
Net Liabilities on March 31, 2012 is made up as follows:
Net liabilities as previously reported $ (289,028)
Transfer from the Department of Innovation and Advanced Education (1,050)
Change in Net Financing provided from General Revenues 1,050


Net liabilities at March 31, 2012 $ (289,028)




Alberta health spending rises over $20 billion, even as province tries to 'bend the cost curve'

Published on: April 15, 2016 | Last Updated: April 15, 2016 8:23 AM MDT
Alberta Premier Rachel Notley gives the thumbs up before Finance Minister Joe Ceci delivers the 2016 budget in Edmonton on Thursday April 14, 2016.
Alberta Premier Rachel Notley gives the thumbs up before Finance Minister Joe Ceci delivers the 2016 budget in Edmonton on Thursday April 14, 2016. JASON FRANSON / THE CANADIAN PRESS
Alberta is set to surpass $20 billion in health spending for the first time this year, as the NDP government moves ahead with major investments in continuing care spaces, information technology and midwifery services.
Though critics blasted the government for failing to do more to rein in the province’s biggest area of expense, Health Minister Sarah Hoffman defended her approach of planned, cautious moves to slow the growth of spending.
“We are not going to be looking at moving wrecking balls through essential hospitals, like we saw in the 1990s. That certainly didn’t benefit us and it left us with a big backlog,” Hoffman said.
“If we had a freeze, we would be looking at having to lay off staff. And we need to reduce wait times, and if you cut access for MRIs, CT scans and cancer surgeries, it would do the opposite.”
The health budget unveiled Thursday largely followed the playbook the NDP government laid out last fall with its first budget. As expected, overall health expenditures are budgeted to rise this year by about $507 million, or three per cent, from projected spending in 2015-16. In subsequent years, the government plans to have annual increases of around two per cent, well down from the average six-per-cent hikes seen under the Progressive Conservatives.
Alberta Health Services receives the bulk of the funding, $14.3 billion, which includes a $175-million increase this year.
Fourten billion (dollars) is bigger than many provinces’ operating budgets. — Health Minister Sarah Hoffman
However, the money is being provided in more restrictive envelopes, with specific amounts set aside for home care, continuing care, ambulances and other areas.
“When our premier was in opposition, we were incredibly frustrated, and I think Albertans were frustrated and wanted to see more transparency,” Hoffman said. “Fourteen billion (dollars) is bigger than many provinces’ operating budgets.”
Hoffman said the province has asked AHS to boost funding for midwives by $1.8 million in each of the next three years. That is expected to help an additional 400 pregnant women get access to a midwife each year.
health graphic
Hoffman has said her government’s efforts to “bend the cost curve” on health spending over time is particularly focused on three big expenses: doctors, hospitals and drugs.
With physicians, the government and the Alberta Medical Association have begun negotiations on controlling the rise in doctors’ pay, including reforms to change how doctors are compensated.
The budget makes a start in that direction with a $63-million increase this year in physician pay, much lower than recent history. Hoffman said the government is also looking at making better use of other health services and professionals such as nurse practitioners, and HealthLink.
As for reducing hospital use, one of the government’s main approaches is to add new continuing care units. The budget features $165 million over the next two years to help build 25 projects announced last fall that are expected to add 2,000 new long-term care and dementia spaces. An additional $100 million in each of 2018 and 2019 have been earmarked for future continuing care projects.
Wildrose health critic Drew Barnes said Albertans are angry not just at high levels of spending but at perceptions the money is not being well spent. He noted recent statistics showing lengthening wait times for cancer surgeries despite an increase in funding last year.
“My concern with the $500 million extra they want to put in next year, are Albertans actually going to have better results,” Barnes said. “There has been a lot of talk about bending the costs curve, but we just haven’t seen it.”
The entire capital budget to build health infrastructure is nearly $3.5 billion over the next five years, though more than a third of it will be eaten up by construction of the new Calgary Cancer Centre.  A final estimate for that project has yet to be announced, with construction not ready to start until 2017 or 2018.
No new funding was announced for major health projects in Edmonton, though Hoffman noted there is money to continue planning redevelopments of the Misericordia and Royal Alex hospitals, and potentially a new medical lab facility.
As well, $400 million will go toward creating a new “clinical information system” that will help create a single health record for patients that can be accessed throughout the health network. The system is expected to be rolled out first at University Hospital, and then expand to other facilities across the province.
Sandra Azocar of the advocacy group Friends of Medicare called the budget a “relief” for people who depend on health care: “A three-per-cent increase is not ideal, but it will allow the government some time to find where else we can find efficiencies and cost containment.”

RELATED

Other highlights:

• A total of $500 million in the capital budget over the next five years is still unallocated. It will go to future health projects that have yet to be determined.
• An increase of about $6 million for mental health services. Interim Liberal leader David Swann, who co-authored a recent review of the mental health system, said the amount is a “pittance” to address the high level of unmet need. However, he said the province needs to clarify lines of responsibility for mental health before more money is invested.
• Funding for Primary Care Networks will jump by $64 million to $233 million. The increase comes after a year in which PCNs were expected to self-fund part of their operations by using $50 million in accumulated surpluses.
• Within the AHS budget, there are increases of $67 million for home care and $126 million for community and continuing care.
kgerein@postmedia.com




Alberta Health budget woes trigger administrative cuts

Alberta Health Services says budget cuts should not have any impact on clinical staff

CBC News Posted: Mar 14, 2013 12:06 PM MT Last Updated: Mar 14, 2013 6:26 PM MT
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Alberta Health Services says it plans to cut administrative costs by tens of millions of dollars to deal with a budget squeeze.
The provincial health "superboard" announced plans Thursday to cut its administrative costs by at least 10 per cent. Included in the cuts is a three-year compensation freeze for all management, which affects roughly 10,000 of their 100,000 staff members.
AHS hopes the move will save nearly $35 million over the next three years. The head of AHS says the budget cuts should not have any impact on clinical staff.
hi-chris-eagle-ceo-ahs-852-3col
Alberta Health Services CEO Dr. Chris Eagle says he thinks there can be a lot of saving on the administrative side. (CBC)
Dr. Chris Eagle says AHS has other priorities.
"Really focusing on chronic disease management and really trying to make sure that the use of hospitals is for the most essential, but not for the degree of services that we are using right now," he said.
The AHS board met Thursday in Lethbridge to plan the administrative cost savings. A full budget will be approved by the board in early April.
AHS will review executive salaries and is also in the process of reviewing the size of its senior leadership team. It says it hopes to have the leanest, most effective team possible when the review is completed later this year.

Finance minister agrees with austerity measures

There will also be a hiring freeze on all non-critical administrative positions, and all new hiring will be focused on clinical care.
AHS is also freezing all travel except in the "most exceptional, care-related and business circumstances," and cutting expenses for the use of consultants and external facilitators.
"Albertans want front-line services and they want to make sure the administration piece is as minimal as possible," said Alberta's Finance Minister Doug Horner. "I think that's just prudent business on part of AHS and listening to what Albertans told them."
Health care in Alberta got an increase in funding in the recent provincial budget of more than three per cent, moving funding up to $17.1 billion. But that falls shy of 4.5 per cent that was anticipated by health officials.
Horner said AHS made the right choice in freezing wages for top staff while facing budget pressures.
"I'm glad to see that they're following our lead," he said. "We did the same thing with our management and opted out two or three weeks ago, as you know, we froze saleries for all of the management and opted out for the next three years."

Opposition weighs in

But opposition MLAs were not as impressed with the plan.
"We calculate that there is about $2 billion spent on administrative costs, executive salaries, expense accounts and they're talking about saving $35 million over three years," said Wildrose Official Opposition Leader Danielle Smith. "I mean this is baby steps. It's nice they are paying lip service to this. We actually do need, though, to see them take some real action."
The opposition also says front-line health-care workers are very frustrated with having to deal with too many layers of management.
"We're not getting ahead of the game," said Liberal health critic David Swann. "We're not dealing with front-line issues adequately. We're still struggling it seems to me in management issues and lack of community care."




Office of the Alberta Health Advocates
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 422-1812
Health Advocate
780 422-1817
Executive Assistant
780 422-1817
Office Administrator
780 422-1812
Director, Office of the Alberta Health Advocates
780 641-9671
Health Advocate Representative, Edmonton
780 941-9675
Health Advocate Representative, Edmonton
780 641-9672
Health Advocate Representative, Edmonton
780 641-9673
Health Advocate Representative
780 422-1812
Mental Health Patient Advocate
780 422-1812
Patient Rights Advocate
780 422-1812
Patient Rights Advocate




Communications
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 427-5344
Director
780 643-9358
Assistant Director, Corporate Communications
780 427-5795
Executive Assistant
780 422-6522
Public Affairs Officer
780 427-0791
Public Affairs Officer
780 422-7951
Public Affairs Officer
780 644-5509
Public Affairs Officer
780 415-0953
Public Affairs Officer
780 643-6350
Public Affairs Officer
780 415-1231
Public Affairs Officer
780 427-5397
Web Content Coordinator
780 638-2943
Administrative Support




HIA Policy, Privacy and Security
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 422-5340
Director
780 427-8089

780 415-1403
Senior Manager
780 641-9600
HIA Policy Analyst
780 427-2629
HIA Policy Analyst
780 422-5712
HIA Policy Analyst
780 644-3571
HIA Policy Analyst
780 415-8949
Strategic Policy Advisor
780 643-9343
Privacy and Security Manager
780 427-3177
Database Audit Analyst
780 644-5553
Privacy Advisor
780 427-7139
Privacy Advisor
780 422-8642
Privacy Advisor
780 427-1222
Privacy Data Administrator
780 644-3606
Senior Security Analyst
780 638-3151
Security Analyst
780 643-9150
Security Advisor
780 644-7407
Netcare Access, Security Specialist
780 644-7938
Provincial eHealth Policy Advisor




Addiction and Mental Health Branch
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 641-8644
Executive Director, Addiction and Mental Health
780 643-6371
Assistant to the Executive Director
780 641-8641
Administrative Support
780 415-2817
Admistrative Assistant
780 415-0616
Administrative Assistant




Mental Health Unit
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 415-2609
Director
780 427-4305
Grant and Contract Coordinator
780 427-1731
Advisor, Child, Youth and Family
780 641-8643
Policy Advisor, Mental Health
780 427-3117
Policy Advisor, Mental Health
780 644-7540
Assurance and Strategy Advisor




Addiction Unit
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 643-9353
Addiction Director
780 641-8642
Manager, Harm Reduction
780 644-3304
Policy Advisor, Addiction
780 427-8088
Manager, Addiction
780 422-1361
Policy Advisor, Addiction
780 643-6852
Advisor, Addiction
780 641-8629
Policy Advisor




Continuing Care Branch
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 638-4495

780 644-3621
Executive Director, Continuing Care
780 638-3105
Executive Directors Assistant
780 644-1041
Office Administrator




Health Standards, Quality and Performance
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 422-8989
Assistant Deputy Minister
780 644-0424
Executive Support


Additional Employee Listings


Name
Phone
780 427-0624




Health Funding Team
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 427-1857
Manager
780 427-3395
Senior Analyst
780 427-8671
Senior Funding and Evaluation Analyst




Compliance Unit
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 427-2143
Auditor






Compliance and Monitoring Branch
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 415-2174
Executive Director
780 427-5796
Assistant to the Executive Director
780 415-1446
Assistant to the Executive Director




Investigations
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 644-2216
Manager, Investigations
780 644-7828
Senior Compliance Investigator
780 644-8398
Licensing Processor
780 643-9139
Senior Compliance Investigator
780 427-7433
Senior Compliance Investigator
780 427-1737
Senior Compliance Investigator
780 644-4913
Senior Compliance Investigator
780 415-6032
Compliance Analyst
780 643-9473
Compliance Analyst
780 415-1443
Compliance Analyst
780 415-1497
Compliance Analyst
780 415-1432
Compliance Analyst
780 415-1444
Compliance Analyst






Protection for Persons in Care
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
Toll Free Number 1-888-357-9339

780 427-0552
Manager, Protection for Persons in Care
780 427-0643
Nurse Consultant / Complaints Officer
780 422-1314
Nurse Consultant / Complaints Officer
780 422-7177
Complaints Officer
780 427-7396
Complaints Officer
780 644-7549
Intake Complaints Officer
780 427-9134
Program Officer
780 427-0658
Administrative Assistant






Audit and Planning
Organizational Unit
Name
Phone
Title
780 415-2857
Director
780 422-1975
Manager
780 638-4517
Team Lead, Risk Based Audit Analytics
780 415-1416
Senior Compliance Research Analyst
780 415-1441
Senior Compliance Research Analyst
780 644-3141
Senior Compliance Investigator
780 415-1448
Audit Lead
780 638-3561
Audit Lead
780 415-1405
Audit Lead
780 644-2994
Audit Lead
780 415-1425
Auditor
780 422-7124
Accountability Specialist














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