Monday, May 22, 2017

CUPE says the study suggests "direct care staffing should be set at a minimum of 4.1 hours per resident each day." The research also shows that, in countries with higher resident care and staffing levels, care quality is better, resident-on-resident violence is lower, as is the use of medications.

More staff:resident time impossible but not more money for big oil --Oddly enough in Alberta --everything is impossible for the residents in the continuing care system like more time with staff, better trained staff, more supports and services and integrated care teams---until there is #MediaAttention and #SocialMediaChangesEverything--then suddenly everything that was impossible before --becomes possible.
So the only way I can figure this out is that the government of Alberta only does the work when we have the attention of the distracted public focused on it.
Most of the time small decisions such as the major money given as a loan to big oil to encourage the industry to do its job in the area of the orphan well program--well this sort of decision of wasting our public dollars is not significant to the public. The public is bamboozled by the miracle of the "loaned" money given with no interest charges---creating jobs.The same jobs that the oil industry eliminated so as to maintain profits and takeover cheap oil companies that were going bankrupt to create the problem in the orphan well reclamation that was already underfunded and where the work was done in a desultory fashion as befitting the emperor and empress industry of Alberta.
Now of course the government of Alberta under the inept and gutless NDP folks has ponied up money to shame the oil and gas industry to take care of its own damn liabilities while the media clones applaud this handing over of our cash for no damn reason that I can determine to create the jobs that everyone is happy about. Meanwhile some ghost landlords (obviously not the one that Stewart Shields yapped with) are promoted by media spin about their happiness over the handing over of this major cash.
It's all very farcical in Alberta. But one thing is for sure. The residents in care won't get $235 million as a loan with interest charges taken care of so as to help out in terms of staff:resident ratios or four hours of time with a staff member. The folks in the continuing care system aren't part of the elite or the emperor and empress industry of Alberta.

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/time-to-care-act-1.3865727

CUPE calls for legislative support for bill aimed at improving long-term care

France Gelinas' private member's bill would mandate each long-term care resident get 4 hours of care every day

CBC News Posted: Nov 24, 2016 2:58 PM ET Last Updated: Nov 24, 2016 2:58 PM ET
Officials with the Canadian Union of Public Employees are calling on the provincial legislature to support a private member's bill that would mandate a four hour daily minimum standard of care for long-term care residents.
Officials with the Canadian Union of Public Employees are calling on the provincial legislature to support a private member's bill that would mandate a four hour daily minimum standard of care for long-term care residents. (Martha Dillman / CBC)
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The New Democrat MPP for the Nickel Belt riding is calling for changes to how much care residents of long term care homes get each day.
France Gelinas is behind a private member's bill, called the Time to Care Act, that would mandate that each person in a long-term care facility get a minimum of four hours of care and attention by staff every day.
"It makes their lives more respectful," she said at a press conference held in conjunction with the Canadian Union of Public Employees Thursday morning in Sudbury, Ont.
"It gives the people who are there to help them the time to do this in a way that is not always rushed."
CUPE is calling on the Ontario legislature to put the bill into law, challenging politicians to show "political will and a non-partisan approach," according to a press release issued by the union.
CUPE represents many health care workers in Sudbury and across the province. The union said that the majority of residents who would be impacted by the bill are more than 80 years old and have multiple chronic conditions, including dementia.
 Jason Harasymchuk
Jason Harasymchuk is a registered practical nurse in Sudbury, Ont. who works in long-term care. (Martha Dillman / CBC)

Long-term care staff supporting changes: CUPE

For the staff who work in long-term care homes, having a law that would guarantee they had enough time to spend with each patient is welcome, said a registered practical nurse in Sudbury.
Jason Harasymchuk says even by having just a few minutes more time each day to spend supporting and caring for residents would make a profound difference.
"And it would make such a difference on the morale of staff who work very hard during the little time they have now to complete tasks and provide care," he said.
"Family members need peace of mind knowing that their loved ones are safe and getting good care."
CUPE says the findings of a Canadian-led international research study, Promising Practices in Long-Term Care, show that better care quality hinges on promoting a care relationship between the resident and caregiver. And that requires adequate staff and an appropriate mix of staff.
CUPE says the study suggests "direct care staffing should be set at a minimum of 4.1 hours per resident each day."
The research also shows that, in countries with higher resident care and staffing levels, care quality is better, resident-on-resident violence is lower, as is the use of medications.










































































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      George Duquette
      • George Duquette
      I know of one lady who is going through a nightmare because she was told she will be evicted snce she can no longer afford her private senior care facility. The vulnerable need to be protected in our society.
      • 5 months ago
      Sam Miller
      • Sam Miller
      This absolutely has to be done. The staff have no time to do anything except RUSH through care getting residents bathed, dressed, fed three meals, undressed, put back to bed.

      Days and evening shifts have THREE PSWs and ONE RPN for 32 residents.
      Night shift has and ONE PSW and ONE RPN for 32 residents.
       Most residents require TWO PSWs to give basic care and do transfers.

      It is an impossible situation and there is lots of neglect. Seniors are getting the MINIMUM of BASIC care and sometimes not... » more
      • 5 months ago
      George Duquette
      • George Duquette
      @Sam Miller My mother started a nose hemorrage and had to wait 15-20 minutes at Cassell Holme before help came. The room was covered in blood,
      • 5 months ago
      Susan Jones
      • Susan Jones
      It's time we put people before profit.


    It is doubtful to me that any government in Canada is going to mandate the number of hours that a resident in the continuing care system gets. The push is to do the work as fast as possible and with as few folks as possible. In addition the dumbing down of the system has been ongoing for decades which means that poorly trained staff will be dealing with increasingly complex cases.
    Without any interest by government in these poor unfortunates it is up to families to do the work of changing the system which requires #MediaAttention #SocialMediaChangesEverything and #SHARESHARESHARE unfortunately to bring these issues of neglect, non-compliances and poor government oversight to the attention of a largely indifferent public.
    In my opinion, the politicians will merely use this issue as a vote gathering ploy and won't do anything with the issue once they are in government as proven by the history to date of the NDPCs in Alberta.
    What's required is a massive public outcry and ongoing accountability required by the public.
    These folks in the continuing care system are the most vulnerable defenceless citizens.
    Why should they suffer because the elite in the government and the industry are simply self serving?
    We're all able to do the work of activism.
    Families need to gather together and kick government rump all over Canada.
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