Friday, May 26, 2017

Carole A Walker · Works at Retired I hate to say this but the elderly are expendible. Don't have to pay them their pensions anymore. health care has it's priorities all wrong, forget those who keep themselves high even though thousands are spent on education against drugs and start concentrating on those who really need and want help and furthermore contributed to this country. I am sorry for your loss, it should not be this way. Unlike · Reply · 2 · 7 hrs Julie Ali · University of Alberta Very true. The seniors and handicapped in our society are seen as expensive to treat for what little time they have left. Doctors have the ability to decide life and death; in some cases they make these decisions inappropriately in my opinion. Families should be aware of the expediency decisions of the system that is not designed to treat all of us the same way. Why else was the Grey Nuns Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta putting "Do Not Resuscitate", "Do not intubate", and "No ICU" orders on my handicapped sister's file for a five year period while she was a long term care resident? It's clear to me it was cheaper for the doctors to do the premature termination route against her wishes as stated in the personal directive and against the family wishes--than to do the provision of appropriate care. It's troubling but families need to be willing to ask for the medical notes and review care if they feel that there have been care issues. Be aware that both hospitals and continuing care facilities use the Trespass to Premises legislation to manage advocates with care concerns; retribution includes banning, evictions, removal from hospital with the hospital act and lawsuits. It's a punitive way of dealing with care concerns and I believe that the human rights issues of these harmed citizens are ignored. Like · Reply · 10 mins





May 25, 2017 8:50 pm

Aldergrove family shares Abbotsford hospital horror story

By Paula BakerOnline News Producer Global News
Warning: Graphic content. An Aldergrove family is sharing their hospital horror story that started with a loved-one taking a fall and ended in his death. John Hua reports.
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An Aldergrove family is sharing their hospital horror story with the hopes that it will bring about some change.
John Hehn died in Abbotsford Regional Hospital on Saturday after his heart finally gave out. His family believes the toll of a head trauma and a broken neck was too much for the 85-year-old man to bear.
“This is what I’ll be thinking about the whole time… about my dad dying, will be this is how he died,” Hehn’s daughter Carleen said through tears.
“He shouldn’t have went like that. It shouldn’t have been like that.”
Two days earlier Hehn was sent home from the hospital and told to take Tylenol for his pain.
“The doctor told me that there was no medical reason to keep my dad in the hospital,” Carleen told Global News.
This feedback was given after the elderly man had fallen down a flight of stairs at home. According to Carleen, the hospital’s medical staff diagnosed her father with a fractured skull and nose but no brain bleed.
Wendy Hehn said watching her father suffer at home was a nightmare.
“I thought, ‘Oh my God what’s wrong’. What’s wrong with my dad, why is he here?” Wendy said.
The next day Hehn was rushed back to the emergency room and while scans did not find a brain bleed, they did identify two broken vertebrae in his neck.
According to the family, the doctor who discovered the broken neck said Hehn should never have been sent home in the first place and at the very least should have been kept in the trauma ward overnight.
“If he’d stayed in the hospital that night… maybe they would have found that. Or they could’ve given him pain medicine,” Carleen said. “He had nothing, nothing.”
Fraser Health is now launching an investigation.
The Hehn family also says paramedics never used a backboard or neck brace to stabilize their father on either trip to the hospital.
BC Emergency Health Services is offering condolences but no explanation.
“I know he had a broken neck that entire time and the last 48 hours were horrible,” Wendy said about her father’s injuries.
On top of grieving the loss of a husband and father, the Hehn family is left to wonder how his final days could have gone so wrong.
“It tortures me to think… and I’ll never forget that,” Carleen said.

Families demanding answers from Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Fraser Health

This is not a first-time occurrence for the Abbotsford hospital.
Balraj Gill said her daughter Nimrat woke up with a fever at around 2 a.m. on Feb. 6. She sensed something wasn’t right so she and the girl’s father took her to Abbotsford Regional Hospital.
Gill said she was advised to go home and give her daughter Tylenol. Nimrat’s condition worsened during the night, according to her mother. She started throwing up at home.
Her parents said they rushed her to hospital at 5 a.m. on Feb. 7. They said they waited for hours in the emergency room for X-rays and blood tests.
“Her body colour was changing and she can’t speak clearly,” Gill said. “’Her body is fighting with temperature, fever,’ that was the answer of the doctor.”
Moments later, Gill said Nimrat died. A doctor’s report claimed that Nimrat succumbed to “a large left-sided pneumonia… septic shock related to this with resulting respiratory failure leading to cardiac arrest.”
A similar incident happened in late January involving a 56-year-old woman and prompted her family to demand answers from Fraser Health.
Mary Lou Murphy dedicated her life to helping others. On Jan. 30 Murphy went to Abbotsford Regional Hospital sweating profusely and in considerable pain. After a five-hour wait she was given a shot of morphine and sent home.
“She had been treated in the community for muscular spasm with the appropriate medications,” Fraser Health Medicine Vice President Dr. Roy Morton said at the time. “That was what the discharge diagnosis was from the emergency room.”
A friend said he visited her the next day at home and knew it was something much worse. Murphy died sometime that night.
Murphy and Nimrat’s deaths occurred one week apart.
“Doctors can sometimes have different opinions about the treatment for a patient,” Tasleem Juma, a spokesperson with Fraser Health said.
“They’re making decisions based on information they have at the time.”
However according to the B.C. Nurses Union, there is a chronic staffing shortage at Abbotsford Regional Hospital’s emergency room. In March, the union sounded the alarm by comparing the emergency room conditions at some Lower Mainland hospitals to scenes from television’s M*A*S*H.
The union says there should be 88 nurses in the ER but there are currently 32 missing.
Some of the complaints from nurses at the hospital include grossly congested hallways, psychiatric patients being held in recliners and limited bathroom facilities, according to a release from the union.
At the time of the union’s complaints, Michael Marchbank, president and CEO of Fraser Health, acknowledged the authority has 30 vacant positions, but said they have “significantly expanded the specialty training” they do.

~ with files from John Hua and Jon Azpiri



Carole A Walker · 
Works at Retired

I hate to say this but the elderly are expendible. Don't have to pay them their pensions anymore. health care has it's priorities all wrong, forget those who keep themselves high even though thousands are spent on education against drugs and start concentrating on those who really need and want help and furthermore contributed to this country. I am sorry for your loss, it should not be this way.
UnlikeReply27 hrs
Julie Ali · 

Very true. The seniors and handicapped in our society are seen as expensive to treat for what little time they have left. Doctors have the ability to decide life and death; in some cases they make these decisions inappropriately in my opinion. Families should be aware of the expediency decisions of the system that is not designed to treat all of us the same way.

Why else was the Grey Nuns Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta putting "Do Not Resuscitate", "Do not intubate", and "No ICU" orders on my handicapped sister's file for a five year period while she was a long term care resident? It's clear to me it was cheaper for the doctors to do the premature termination route against her wishes as stated in the personal directive and against the family wishes--than to do the provision of appropriate care.

It's troubling but families need to be willing to ask for the medical notes and review care if they feel that there have been care issues. Be aware that both hospitals and continuing care facilities use the Trespass to Premises legislation to manage advocates with care concerns; retribution includes banning, evictions, removal from hospital with the hospital act and lawsuits. It's a punitive way of dealing with care concerns and I believe that the human rights issues of these harmed citizens are ignored.
LikeReply10 mins



Amanda Schofield
How does being short staffed equal poor quality of care?
It's a choice not to give adequate care.. I don't understand how not enough staff, chairs or beds, changes the need for an X-ray, blood work or a proper medical examination.
UnlikeReply310 hrs
Lauren Stepney
If you are understaffed the ratios of patients to nurses and dr's are too high causing things to get missed. If I have 8 patients instead of 4 because two people called in sick or there's a vacant line there's no way I can do for 8 in my shift what I normally do for 4. Not only that but if I miss my meal breaks I'm tired and hungry and might miss something I would have otherwise noticed.
LikeReply20 mins
Julie Ali · 

Poor staff:resident ratios in continuing care in Alberta results in care issues and non-compliances that are tolerated by the government despite all its chatter of abuse will not be tolerated.

The paper work done to assess and monitor residents in the continuing care system does not mean that care is appropriate, and reasonable. It's difficult to reconcile the chatter of the continuing care providers who tell families that they do not have enough money and the chatter of the government of Alberta which tells us that PCBF (patient care based funding) is providing more money for those with complex needs.

As the population ages, the needs of residents increases but the number of staff and their qualifications aren't matching the increased demands of the residents they serve. The issues in continuing care are being reported by families but are not being responded to by the government of Alberta because the only role of government is to be a bank apparently and hand out money to facilities to do as they see fit. Just recently the long term care facility in Lacombe which is run by AHS -the health authority was cited for non-compliances that were reported to the GOA by student nurses. Its strange that the student nurses would report non-compliances to the standards of care when this was a facility run by AHS where I would imagine CCHSS audits and Quality Reviews would be done. Why are the problems being missed by the regular audits? Good question. And why are accomodation problems which are the only audits the public see --reporting non-compliances over four years for this facility? Another good question. I think it boils down to the matter of the basket case of oversight by the government in Alberta.

http://rdnewsnow.com/.../ahs-investigation-reveals...
In a statement released late Tuesday, AHS confirmed the investigation was launched after concerns were raised in March by RDC nursing students completing their practicum at the facility.

A release from the Wildrose party earlier in the day said those concerns included expired catheters, soiled sheets and overflowing garbage, improper sharing of medication, lack of proper medication training and management, lack of dementia care training, and a lack of proper training for risk management.
LikeReply1 min








AHS investigation reveals serious long-term care problems at Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre
May 10, 2017 - 12:53pmUpdated: May 10, 2017 - 5:10pm

rdnewsNOW file photo

Three staff members have been placed on leave following an Alberta Health Services internal investigation into the quality of long-term care provided at the Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre.
In a statement released late Tuesday, AHS confirmed the investigation was launched after concerns were raised in March by RDC nursing students completing their practicum at the facility.
A release from the Wildrose party earlier in the day said those concerns included expired catheters, soiled sheets and overflowing garbage, improper sharing of medication, lack of proper medication training and management, lack of dementia care training, and a lack of proper training for risk management.
Brenda Huband, Vice-President and Chief Health Operations Officer for AHS Central and Southern Alberta says actions have been taken to address the concerns.
“We take these concerns very seriously and we responded quickly with our investigation and audits with support from Alberta Health,” she said.
According to AHS, the list of actions being taken at the facility includes:
- Thorough health assessments of all 75 residents in long-term care;
- Physiotherapy and falls risk assessments on all residents;
- A thorough cleaning of the site, with support and guidance from Infection Prevention and Control professionals, of all resident care areas, including medication rooms, medication carts, and tub rooms;
- Improved communication between caregivers and residents/families, and between caregivers;
- The introduction of education sessions for all staff to ensure they understand health service and accommodation standards for continuing care;
- Working with stakeholders to introduce a resident and family council that can meet regularly to ensure high quality care is maintained;
- Three staff have been placed on leave.
AHS says its review, which concluded last week, highlights the need to shift to a more resident and family-focused care model.

“It is best practice in continuing care to develop care plans with input from residents, their families if they choose, and a multi-disciplinary care team,” says Huband. “Our care planning process should respect that this is their home and should take into account their desires about the care they want and need.”


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