Tuesday, May 16, 2017

---Approximately 20% of Canadians know a senior who they believe is experiencing abuse, and some studies suggest that 8-10% of seniors experience elder abuse in one form or another. Put another way, 766,247 seniors were abused in Canada last year.-----------From: Edward Redshaw Date: Tue, May 16, 2017 at 11:33 AM Subject: Long-Term Care Residents Need Your Help

The staggering numbers of seniors who are harmed in the system all over Canada should be enough to get government at all levels to take action but these seniors have no voice in our society and so are ignored. What will change this situation? It won't be government folks to do the change business. It will be us. Families of seniors taking action will alter the apathy, indifference and lack of interest of government to that of action. We're the ones who make change happen.

From: Edward Redshaw 
Date: Tue, May 16, 2017 at 11:33 AM
Subject: Long-Term Care Residents Need Your Help
To: Premier@gov.ab.ca, Health.minister@gov.ab.ca, Edmonton.Rutherford@assembly.ab.ca, elderadv@shaw.ca, Advocate Seniors <seniors.advocate@gov.ab.ca>, Seniors.minister@gov.ab.ca, verna.yiu@albertahealthservices.ca, ahs.board@albertahealthservices.ca, tammy.leach@ab-cca.ca,  David.Swann@assembly.ab.ca,, justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca, 


Dear All:

The safety of residents in long-term care homes is a critical issue. How many more elderly residents will become victims of violence before action is taken to protect their safety?

Recently, I read about James Acker, an 86 year-old nursing home resident with dementia who was badly beaten at 2 am by another resident with dementia. Sadly, he died in hospital. Here’s his story. http://www.carp.ca/campaign/resident-safety-long-term-care-homes/

Tragic stories like this are reported regularly. The details are similar only the names and faces change. As the Toronto Star reports, more than 10,000 Canadians are abused annually by their nursing home co-residents. This is a crime for which no one is paying a penalty. Why is this allowed to happen over and over again?

I urge you to address the problems in long-term care homes which are leading to violence, injuries, and death.

I urge you to rally government to identify immediate solutions and create a plan that can be implemented to protect residents from violence, be it from a co-resident, visitor or health-care worker. This is especially important with the increase in dementia patients who require special care.

Media has reported repeatedly on dementia patients who became victims of violence by long-term care staff.

Long-term care facilities are homes to tens of thousands of vulnerable Canadians. These facilities should provide enhanced care and support, not put the safety of their residents at risk.

Please take action now. The number of victims is rising each day, each year.

One day it could be me. It could be you. Don’t seniors who have contributed a lifetime to Canadian society deserve to be protected better – and not forgotten, neglected, beaten, and violated?

If the answer is yes. Real action needs to happen today, tomorrow and the next to put protections in place.

Additional facts:

One study revealed that 42% of nurses in Ontario had witnessed at least one incident of elder abuse in the past three years.

Approximately 20% of Canadians know a senior who they believe is experiencing abuse, and some studies suggest that 8-10% of seniors experience elder abuse in one form or another.

Put another way, 766,247 seniors were abused in Canada last year.


The number of seniors is expected to double over the next 15 years and CARP anticipates that the number of seniors being abused will in turn increase significantly.

W5 uncovered at least 1,500 cases of staff-to-resident abuse and neglect in nursing homes across Canada in 2013. That number is likely higher due to under-reporting of incidents.

Please let me know what action you will take on this matter.

Sincerely,

Edward Redshaw


Sent from my iPhone

Displaying 8940F281-1A7C-453F-86CD-787E9FFADB90.jpg




No comments:

Post a Comment