Thursday, May 11, 2017

AHS investigation discovers serious problems at Lacombe long-term care facility-Comments Post # 1 ------ “We take these concerns very seriously and we responded quickly with our investigation and audits with support from Alberta Health,” Brenda Huband, chief health operations officer for central and southern Alberta, said in a written statement Tuesday.-------



http://edmontonjournal.com/health/seniors/ahs-investigation-discovers-serious-problems-at-lacombe-long-term-care-facility


AHS investigation discovers serious problems at Lacombe long-term care facility

Published on: May 9, 2017 | Last Updated: May 9, 2017 9:22 PM MDT
Lacombe Hospital
The Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre BRICE ROY/LACOMBE GLOBE/QMI AGENCY / POSTMEDIA
Three staff members at a Lacombe long-term care facility have been placed on leave after an internal Alberta Health Services investigation discovered training deficiencies, unsanitary conditions and a lack of safety around medications.
The health authority said Tuesday the Lacombe Hospital and Health Centre has been thoroughly cleaned. Education sessions have also begun for staff “to ensure they understand health service and accommodation standards for continuing care.”
A total of 75 residents live in the long-term care portion of the health centre, all of whom have been re-assessed.
AHS initiated a review and audit only after nursing students completing their practicums at the site came forward with problems they had witnessed.     
“We take these concerns very seriously and we responded quickly with our investigation and audits with support from Alberta Health,” Brenda Huband, chief health operations officer for central and southern Alberta, said in a written statement Tuesday.
The statement was released shortly after the Wildrose Party highlighted the issue during question period in the legislature and released leaked documents from the audit.
According to the documents, the investigation uncovered:
• Inconsistently updated care plans and patient charting;
• Incomplete fall risk assessments, dietary assessments, vital signs monitoring and wound care interventions;
• Deficient training for staff in infection control, medication management, dementia care, CPR, use of restraints, fall prevention and choking response;
• Improper security of private client information;
• Presence of expired aseptic supplies such as wound care products and catheters;
• Dirty products stored with sterile products;
• Used client razors left unattended, and tubs found to be dirty;
• Soiled linen and garbage found to be overflowing into hallways;
• Unsafe medication practices, including a client administering his own insulin when it was unclear if he was competent to do so;
• Medication rooms left unlocked;
• Poor documentation around whether clients had received required tooth brushing and bathing;
• Inconsistent practices to ensure safe water temperatures for bathing;
• High infection rates and antibiotic use.
kgerein@postmedia.com
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According to the documents, the investigation uncovered soiled linen and garbage found to be overflowing into hallways. And much, much more.
Three staff members at a Lacombe long-term care facility have been placed on leave after an internal Alberta Health Services investigation...
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Nicole Glimm For the record this is not the Lacombe Hospital as a whole it's the long term care side of it. As a professional I am glad the issues came to light and are being addressed as they should but as a health care worker I beg people not to blame nursing staff, often it is above and beyond our control. I work with such super dedicated nurses and it's disgusting to see some of the comments here. Walk a mile in a nurses shoes then re-evaluate before throwing out ignorant statements
Linda Maschmeyer I honestly think that when they say it's the staffs fault they're including management, cleaning staff and the whole situation.
Julie Ali While I agree with you that there are many wonderful professionals working in the health care and continuing care system there are also workers who should not be taking care of vulnerable citizens. It's the responsibility of each professional to keep up to date with reference to skills and it is an ethical requirement to report problems associated with care of residents. However, because of retribution nursing staff may work in untenable situations and non-compliances may be tolerated. It's not correct to do this. We can support nurses in their work but where there are non-compliances, failed nursing practice and neglect how are we supposed to support the staff? There is a duty to the residents first.
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22 hrsEdited
Arlene Hewitt Woodfine Julie Ali well said
Reply46 mins
Julie Ali Arlene Hewitt Woodfine I'm living the continuing care dream (myth) in Alberta with my handicapped sister.
Reply35 mins
This comment will also be posted to edmontonjournal.com.
Julie Ali When I spoke about the problems at the long term care facility where my sister was housed I was told by AHS staff that other families had also complained. So why then were there no audits done? Our family asked about the audit trail and we got one CCHSS audit done in January 2015 but the Quality review by AHS and Alberta Health done in October 2014 of the facility was not provided nor were there any other audits. So my question is that why was there only these three audits done on a long term care facility that has been in business for ages? Could it be that government in Alberta waits for families and in this case for nursing students to point out non-compliances before any sort of oversight is provided? What is the role of Alberta Health if it is not responsible for oversight of continuing care facilities? Is it simply a last responder on the scene?
Maureen Schwab The fact that student nurses were the ones to report this while those responsible for the operating of this facility seemed to turn a blind eye is appalling but thankfully these students spoke up. To think that fragile elderly were living in these conditions is deplorable.
Terry Jones Flewelling To finally hear this after years of complaining to managers etc. is a godsend. To admit that it was some students that brought this all on is pathetic. The staff have tried for years to get some help in place only to come up against a deaf ear.
Tina Rodgers 😔😔
Cassandra Black Keep in mind most employee have Codes of conduct that include speaking out against the employer. AHS has such a policy.
Terry Jones Flewelling Joe Public can express their views though.
Lucia Materiale Terry Jones Flewelling it was not like this 10 yrs ago
Marilyn Black Chalmers Cassandra is surprises me that the unions would allow such codes of conduct. So sad for everyone that involved.
Julie Ali Terry Jones Flewelling So I am curious. Why did AHS and Alberta Health not listen to the permanent staff but suddenly when the student nurses complain they start to do their jobs?
Julie Ali Cassandra Black Codes of conduct should not prohibit the requirement to speak for vulnerable residents first. The nursing code I believe indicates does it not that the first duty is to the patient?
Reply33 mins
Julie Ali Lucia Materiale It has been like this for ages. Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society has been documenting this junk for decades. We are only hearing about the problems because of social media.
Reply33 mins




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