Thursday, April 13, 2017

The surprising part about Dekervor, and the thirty or so families who have joined her to mount a class action suit against Revera, is that she and they have come forward. I believe elder abuse is pervasive in Canadian long-term care. The problem is, it’s also hidden, and thus hard to fight. Whistleblowers are few and far between and family members often either don’t recognize abuse if they see it or fear reprisals or even worse care if they rock the boat. Those who do complain have a hard time being heard and making their stories stick because facilities and their “experts” hold all the cards. Think David and Goliath without the happy ending.

I am going through the accounts. For the past few years I have been paying for Rebecca's stuff like her Telus bill and now I am adding up the total. It's a bit of a problem getting paid as AISH isn't a big amount. So I spread the costs about.
Then after the bills I am going to look at the taxes. There are a pile of papers in a bag that I have collected so it will be first sorting the things there. Most of the time I have to reconfigure my brain for taxes and it takes me a week or so.
I want to get through taxes before older boy comes home for the visit to us. He's only got a few days and I do not want to (again) be covered in paper and too busy with lawsuit work to yap with him.
The paper from the lawsuit is still on the floor. I haven't got to tidying it up as yet so the dustballs in the writing room are multiplying.
The geraniums have not been watered. I read a few books yesterday and rehydrated. The comments I put on FB and newspapers were grumpy such as this one on BananaGate:
http://readingchildrensbooks.blogspot.ca/…/04/bananagate.htm
Julie Ali So much time wasted on this issue when serious problems in funding for children with special needs could be dealt with it. Bananagate might be the marker story for the NDP error.
**
I begin to think that the brains of politicians are wired for #MediaAttention and even #BananaGate gets them to blab endlessly for no reason on the merits of snacks in the LEGISLATURE while real problems like the poor funding for special needs kids and the lacklustre services get left somewhere in NeverLand.
But let me not get grumpy yet again.
I will go through the AISH account.
I will plan to buy an extra mask for Rebecca so that she is not without a mask when the one she is using has an unfortunate problem
I will think about the upcoming meeting with the Villa Marguerite staff and the folks at AHS who come to monitor us for no reason that I can determine. I mean our contract for Rebecca is with the Villa Marguerite and yet we have high end Supportive Living staff at the yearly care conference meeting to put in their two red cents into the conversation.
As for Rebecca I am supposed to do the hair cut but as my brain is pretty fried I will think about doing the hair cut tomorrow. I will check today if the hair stylist who did my hair cut is there tomorrow. It's ugly outside which is another reason to do the hair cut tomorrow.
Right I feel like a pudding. I will go for my walk after banking stuff is done and after the silver dollars of the morning minutes are spent. Spring is very far away based on the colour of the clouds, the unhappy swag of the boulevard tree swaying outside and the indignant honking of the Canada geese who don't seem to be ready for the brisk breeze pushing them forwards into the future.
But first the bills. I also will put the story of Lori Dekover on the blog as I investigate Revera--the company owned by the public servants of Canada.
families turned fighters take on ltc goliath revera for elder abuse 2
BY AMAZINGSUSAN ADVOCACY, TOWARD BETTER CARE
Arthur Ross Jones died in excruciating pain because workers at the long-term care facility where he resided failed to provide the care he needed after a fall. Like many cases of elder abuse, this one may have gone unnoticed had daughter Lori Dekervor not found (almost by accident) a stinking, gaping, infected hole at the base of her father’s spine. Justifiably enraged by the discovery, Dekervor took her case to the provincial ombudsmen, and tried for justice via multiple official channels. Then, dissatisfied with the results, she decided to take legal action in the hope that bringing her father’s story to light might help others avoid the same fate.
I was deeply saddened when Lori told me what happened to her dad, but I wasn’t shocked. Nor was I shocked to hear the stories of others who had similar experiences with long-term care giant Revera, which, coincidentally, include Sue T., the friend of a friend whose elderly parents lived in a facility run by Revera. More about Sue’s story in coming weeks.
The surprising part about Dekervor, and the thirty or so families who have joined her to mount a class action suit against Revera, is that she and they have come forward. I believe elder abuse is pervasive in Canadian long-term care. The problem is, it’s also hidden, and thus hard to fight. Whistleblowers are few and far between and family members often either don’t recognize abuse if they see it or fear reprisals or even worse care if they rock the boat. Those who do complain have a hard time being heard and making their stories stick because facilities and their “experts” hold all the cards. Think David and Goliath without the happy ending.
Here’s an introduction to Dekervor’s class action story (watch the segment here on W5):
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