Saturday, April 1, 2017

Outstanding financial issues may prohibit transfer to another site. In addition, there is no recourse for an operator when an Enduring Power of Attorney is in effect and the appointed attorney is not acting in the best interest of the resident. -----------Transitions in Continuing Care Report and Recommendations for Improvement Prepared by: Transitions in Continuing Care Working Group May 28, 2014--If government will not listen to Ruth Adria may be it will listen to the folks in the continuing care industry who seem to have more power than ordinary citizens in getting government to do its job.--

#GoodSamaritanSocietyLawsuit--Since the government of Alberta does not work for families but works for corporate entities that it supports with our taxes, maybe it will respond to the issue Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society has raised with Alberta Justice folks. The abuse of the Power of Attorney Agreements (POA) is ongoing and will increase. Ruth Adria asked for a registry. Folks at Alberta Justice said no. But what is their solution? In 2014 folks from the continuing care industry raised financial problems such as POA abuse as the number one issue they are faced with (ordinary citizens were not asked to participate in this working group since we don't count).
So if government will not work on the POA issue for the elders in our society and will not do the registry as Ruth Adria has asked for as a partial solution to POA abuses by requirements for scrutiny of a minor sort as well as transparency--what is the government of Alberta's solution?
I mean the baby boomers are going to be in charge of their parents' money soon enough. Not all of us are saints. I'd suggest the Alberta Justice folks get cracking--if not for citizens then for their partners in the continuing care industry.


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Julie Ali feeling happy.
11 mins
After stuffing my brain full of affidavit information I keeled over and slept.
It's like a chalk board process.
I write all over it.
Then I erase the entire.
I begin again.
Now that I am fully in the lawsuit lifestyle of the poor and unfamous what can I tell you about this process?
1) It requires a lot of time.
First you have to write FOIP requests to everyone and their puppy for information like medical records, audits, e-mails, stuff that you can't get until you leap over the barriers placed by government and public bodies ostensibly to protect our "privacy" but in reality to prevent us from easily and inexpensively accessing information that we need to both maintain our health/safety or to defend ourselves in court when we are sued by a continuing care provider in Alberta.
2) You do need some interest.
I have this interest.
3) You can't quit.
Since I am being sued you can't just say-heck I quit.
You have to be the sort of person who will not quit.
When I yapped for years to the Edmonton Public School Board about special education failures with reference to younger boy I got an education in advocacy as well as how the system works.
They listen to you if you are expressing a concern that can get bigwigs in trouble (failing to provide services for a child with a disability) and if you can't be converted into an adversarial parent.
Once you are labelled adversarial by anyone in government or public bodies it is easy for them to dismiss you. This is why a paper trail, tapes of the conversations and third party documents are important. Third party documents include audits, yearly budgets (to show where the money is spent), doctor letters etc. You need to read legislation and be able to interpret it. Legislation is what is required and performance that deviates from the legislation is what the government and public bodies respond to because this is a no no but happens all the time. No one actually does anything about deviations from legislation or the rules because the government and public bodies don't have to do anything. In fact, based on what I have read, most folks in government don't do anything at all for decades but simply sit in their cushy jobs telling us that stuff like anti-SLAPP legislation or an amendment to the Trespass to Premises legislation to allow for an independent of AHS, Covenant Health and Alberta Health appeal process is out of the question. Meanwhile when Ruth Adria asks for a simple registry for POA arrangements this is also a no no for government. Why? I guess the government only responds to business concerns. Well in the government's own report "Transitions in Continuing Care Report and Recommendations for Improvement dated May 28, 2014" the continuing care industry is asking for help as well with reference to POA abuses.
http://www.ascha.com/…/CCTransitionsReviewanRecommendations…
Page 5 of the report indicates these abuses.
Issue #1 Unresolved Legal and Financial Status
Recommendation # 1
Establish a joint Governmental Cross-Ministry and Alberta Health Services working group to
identify strategies for improving access to personal and financial competency assessments,
identifying options when there are capacity or financial challenges and for expediting orders
for Guardianship and Trusteeship when required.
This includes identifying when other mechanisms for alternate decision-making may be used such as
Personal Directives and Enduring Power of Attorney and solutions where there is no alternate decision maker available. It also includes identifying alternatives to the Public Trustee when an individual has too few assets, as well as options for operators when the individual has limited or no capacity to pay or  becomes incapacitated while a resident.
This is a large issue that impacts acute care; addictions and mental health and all of continuing care including home care, AHS owned and operated living option sites, contracted providers and seniors housing operators.
The problem contributes significantly to delays in placement to a continuing care living option and
complicates every step of a transition when not resolved.
The current problem is multi-faceted and includes delays in identifying the need for a capacity assessment (either personal or financial) and subsequent delays in accessing and completing those assessments. It also includes situations where there is no alternate decision maker and/or not enough assets to warrant a Public Trustee, leaving the individual, the health system, contracted care providers and housing operators in limbo.
If a transition occurs and an individual moves into a community seniors living option or is placed into a designated living option without financial matters resolved, it often causes financial hardship for the
individual, delays in payment to the site and a loss of momentum when another organization assumes responsibility for shepherding the process.
If a resident becomes incapacitated while living at the site it can leave the site with no access to assets especially if there is no one else to manage the individual’s financial affairs and in a conflict of interest if the site becomes informal trustee. If Guardianship is required, it often must be obtained before the placement into a designated living option can occur, and/or can take many months to obtain once transferred. When both Guardianship and Public Trusteeship are required, significant delays are experienced as they are separate processes. If financial resources are limited and an application for charges reduction is warranted, this limits living option choices to the individual. Outstanding financial issues may prohibit transfer to another site. In addition, there is no recourse for an operator when an Enduring Power of Attorney is in effect and the appointed attorney is not acting in the best interest of the resident.
Participants on the working group would include but not be limited to representatives of the Office of the Public Guardian, Office of the Public Trustee, Social Services, Alberta Health, Alberta Health Services and contracted partners.
****
If government will not listen to Ruth Adria may be it will listen to the folks in the continuing care industry who seem to have more power than ordinary citizens in getting government to do its job.
What government and public bodies like the Edmonton Public School Board call adversarial the medical and continuing care system call safety issues for staff and ban you for it.
Both sets of systems use these handy dandy made for these purposes measures as a way of defending themselves from legitimate issues that they cannot or will not deal with.
This worked in the past when parents and families had no other recourse to reveal the facts but will not work in the time of social media. The very presence of social media is an assault on the system. The way that social media will be controlled by the elite in the future as it is already being attempted now by controls that Facebook is implementing as noted below this post will be the way that the elite in our society manage public knowledge, truth and dissent.
4) The fact is you can't do this stuff by yourself. You need other mums and advocates. I began with other families, I am following Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society (#FollowingRuthAdria), I am working in the Elder Advocates Working Group, and I am connecting with other families across Canada and the USA. This issue of elder abuse-in whatever form --is a public issue that needs public discourse and exposure by the government of Alberta. Critical Care Violations (CCV) are published about the long term care system in Ontario. Why not in Alberta? Well in Alberta the business interests are protected over the public interest. Apparently profits are more important to the government of Alberta than the health and safety information that should be provided to families. Why? It's all about the image and not the performance. Government looks bad if there are CCV in the public realm and successive media stories helps to boot out useless politicians as we did in the last election to no results with the new politicians.
5) Once you have your network, don't abuse it. I don't call Ruth about every problem. I help Ruth. She has enough on her plate responding day and night to seniors with POA abuse, harm and other problems. She is an unpaid government worker just like Velvet Martin is. All these activists like Leah McRorie are doing the work government is failing to do and why? Government doesn't care, won't do the work, can't do the work and is in secrecy mode. This junk won't change until a whole pile of mummies like us will kick GOA butt which we will do until our families in care are safe and family issues dominate the brains of our hires.
6) Go through the lawsuit. All things pass. A lawsuit is a failure in dialogue. It will be resolved in one way or the other. The public will hear my data and the story of Rebecca will be told.
7) Write the book. Families need to write the stories and self publish if they have to. No one is interested in seniors issues until they are ancient and are in the middle of the junk. Also seniors do not seem to be very willing to shake the government trees in the forest of spin for apples of help.
I would suggest we all join up --mummies and non-mummies to help seniors in all the ways possible.
8) Once the lawsuit is done, keep going. Never quit. Become Ruth Adria.
Here is the way Facebook is being taken over:
From: Reem Suleiman, SumOfUs.org <us@sumofus.org>
Date: Fri, Mar 31, 2017 at 2:31 AM
Subject: Re: Facebook
To: Julie Ali <i
Hey Julie,
Have you heard? Our message reached all the way up Facebook's ivory tower to Mark Zuckerberg. Our long journey and persistence proves just how powerful and influential we can be when enough people speak up...in total, over 250,000 of you!
Last August when Baltimore police killed Korryn Gaines and injured her 5-year-old son Facebook set a dangerous precedent by removing her live broadcast videos at police request.
Over 500,000 people signed petitions to send Facebook a clear message. Together with our friends at Daily Kos, Center for Media Justice, and Color of Change we sent Facebook a public letter signed by 80 organizations to lift up your voice and demand more transparent and accountable content censorship policies.
And Facebook wrote us back.
In October, Facebook's Global Head of Policy Joel Kaplan was forced to send a formal response to your demands. Major news outlets like The Guardian and Reuters covered our correspondence with Kaplan, and our growing movement to bring Facebook's censorship policies to light.
Our combined petitions racked up over 570,000 signatures from people around the world, all calling on Facebook to change their censorship policies and their compliance with law enforcement. We delivered these petitions to Facebook last month, following Mark Zuckerberg’s post about building global community.
In his statement, Zuckerberg mentioned our campaign work several times, including in this paragraph:
"In the last year, the complexity of the issues we've seen has outstripped our existing processes for governing the community. We saw this in errors taking down newsworthy videos related to Black Lives Matter and police violence, and in removing the historical Terror of War photo from Vietnam.”
Our message permeated all the way to the top of Facebook's HQ, so we know Zuckerberg is paying attention.
But this work isn’t done. In the Trump era, it’s more important than ever that people can freely post coverage of protests and not have their data turned over to police, here and across the world. And in Zuckerberg's suggested plan, the company could further expose vulnerable minorities to violence, harassment, and censorship.
So our fight isn't over yet. In fact, we have filed a shareholder resolution against Facebook coming this summer to give Zuckerberg greater accountability to the board. While the work continues, I wanted to report back to you and thank you for speaking up, because your voice matters. Sometimes it feels like signing a petition can have questionable impact, but often the petitions you sign are part of strategic campaigns — and having big numbers of people forces petition targets to listen to our demands. And it worked here, Facebook heard you.
Thank you for your hard work on this. Our work against corporate power grabs is far from done.
Are you in this fight? Donate whatever you can afford now to become a core part of the campaign against the unchecked power of Silicon Valley.
Thanks for all that you do,
Reem, Nicole, and the team at SumOfUs
**********
More information:
2016: the year Facebook became the bad guy, The Guardian, 12 December 2016.
Mark Zuckerberg: Building Global Community, Facebook, 16 February 2017.
SumOfUs is a community of people from around the world committed to curbing the growing power of corporations. We want to buy from, work for and invest in companies that respect the environment, treat their workers well and respect democracy. And we’re not afraid to stand up to them when they don’t.
Please help keep SumOfUs strong by chipping in CA$3 or become a SumOfUs core member with a regular monthly donation.
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http://www.ascha.com/PDF_files/rollout/2014/CCTransitionsReviewanRecommendationsFINAL28_05_14.pdf

Transitions in Continuing Care Report and Recommendations for Improvement Prepared by: Transitions in Continuing Care Working Group May 28, 2014


Issue #1 Unresolved Legal and Financial Status Recommendation # 1 Establish a joint Governmental Cross-Ministry and Alberta Health Services working group to identify strategies for improving access to personal and financial competency assessments, identifying options when there are capacity or financial challenges and for expediting orders for Guardianship and Trusteeship when required. This includes identifying when other mechanisms for alternate decision-making may be used such as Personal Directives and Enduring Power of Attorney and solutions where there is no alternate decision maker available. It also includes identifying alternatives to the Public Trustee when an individual has too few assets, as well as options for operators when the individual has limited or no capacity to pay or becomes incapacitated while a resident. This is a large issue that impacts acute care; addictions and mental health and all of continuing care including home care, AHS owned and operated living option sites, contracted providers and seniors housing operators. The problem contributes significantly to delays in placement to a continuing care living option and complicates every step of a transition when not resolved. The current problem is multi-faceted and includes delays in identifying the need for a capacity assessment (either personal or financial) and subsequent delays in accessing and completing those assessments. It also includes situations where there is no alternate decision maker and/or not enough assets to warrant a Public Trustee, leaving the individual, the health system, contracted care providers and housing operators in limbo. If a transition occurs and an individual moves into a community seniors living option or is placed into a designated living option without financial matters resolved, it often causes financial hardship for the individual, delays in payment to the site and a loss of momentum when another organization assumes responsibility for shepherding the process. If a resident becomes incapacitated while living at the site it can leave the site with no access to assets especially if there is no one else to manage the individual’s financial affairs and in a conflict of interest if the site becomes informal trustee. If Guardianship is required, it often must be obtained before the placement 

into a designated living option can occur, and/or can take many months to obtain once transferred. When both Guardianship and Public Trusteeship are required, significant delays are experienced as they are separate processes. If financial resources are limited and an application for charges reduction is warranted, this limits living option choices to the individual. Outstanding financial issues may prohibit transfer to another site. In addition, there is no recourse for an operator when an Enduring Power of Attorney is in effect and the appointed attorney is not acting in the best interest of the resident. Participants on the working group would include but not be limited to representatives of the Office of the Public Guardian, Office of the Public Trustee, Social Services, Alberta Health, Alberta Health Services and contracted partners.















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