Sunday, April 9, 2017

-Four senior citizens are still living inside a former personal-care home near Mount Carmel, eight months after its licence to operate was revoked by Eastern Health. Families of three current or former residents say they were told by the owners it is no longer a seniors home — it is now a boarding house.-----------------A seniors home in Mount Carmel, N.L., that lost its licence last year allegedly delayed getting medical care for a resident, failed to change soiled clothing, and exhibited "disrespectful and abusive behaviour" towards Eastern Health staff. Those allegations are laid out in documents obtained by CBC News through access to information. The records outline dozens of complaints that triggered the inspection and subsequent closure of Riverside Country Manor Personal Care Home in the St. Mary's Bay community last year. "Riverside Country Manor continued a pattern of noncompliance with provincial standards in the following months which compromised the care and well-being of residents," Eastern Health noted in the documents.


So how does this set up make any sense? The seniors home had oversight when classified as a seniors home but now it has a new designation as a boarding house for five people there is no oversight? How is this even possible?
In any case these sorts of loopholes need to be closed. If you are taking care of a vulnerable population of seniors, charging major bucks for service then government needs to do the work of protecting these folks It simply is not enough to say the boarding house is not under health system jurisdiction? Why not?

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Julie Ali
1 min

So let me get this straight. The seniors home got its license yanked but it still operates albeit with fewer seniors and no oversight?
Wow.
You gotta admire the set up.
It's not acceptable.

Four senior citizens are still living inside a former personal-care home near Mount Carmel, eight months after its licence to operate was revoked by Eastern Health.
CBC.CA



Please note that this is not a nursing home but a care home which is easier to close down.
In Alberta -Alberta health and AHS don't do the oversight in any productive or responsible way that I can determine. If they are doing the audits and reviews why can't the public get this information on compliance and follow up to non-compliances as they can in Ontario? Why is it when I FOIP for the information I am not told that some information is not being provided? Why is it that the GOA is secretive and not accountable to us? I'd say it is because government can do whatever it wants to do and it is able to do this junk because the public have not demanded transparency.
As more folks enter the continuing care system there will be demands for increased accountability and transparency. The GOA can either go forwards with the requirements that families are asking for or we will force change on government by voting out the political parties that simply ignore us.
Creation of placebo advocate offices to whitewash problems won't work any more. We see the problems and we see the unfair set up. We want government to give us the deliverables. Both in information and in follow up work. If necessary we want the licenses yanked. Why not? It's our money.


A seniors home in Mount Carmel, N.L., that lost its licence last year allegedly delayed getting medical care for a resident, failed to change soiled clothing, and…
CBC.CA

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Also note that the home is still operating despite the chatter of pulled license:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/mount-carmel-riverside-country-manor-still-open-1.4042881
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CBC INVESTIGATES

Mount Carmel seniors home still housing residents, despite losing licence

New designation means no provincial oversight of Riverside Country Manor

By Ryan Cooke, CBC News Posted: Mar 29, 2017 7:05 AM NT Last Updated: Mar 29, 2017 5:21 PM NT
Riverside Country Manor in Mount Carmel, St. Mary's Bay, has been unlicenced since July 2016.
Riverside Country Manor in Mount Carmel, St. Mary's Bay, has been unlicenced since July 2016. (Eddy Kennedy/CBC)
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Ryan Cooke
Ryan Cooke works for CBC out of its bureau in St. John's.
Four senior citizens are still living inside a former personal-care home near Mount Carmel, eight months after its licence to operate was revoked by Eastern Health.
Families of three current or former residents say they were told by the owners it is no longer a seniors home — it is now a boarding house.
And that means the health authority no longer has jurisdiction.
Among the residents at Riverside Country Manor is a 96-year-old man who never left the home.
"I don't understand that," said Brian Nolan, nephew of that resident.
"Eastern Health, it's just a way for them to clear themselves of the home. There's nobody who checks on these people anymore."
Brian Nolan
Brian Nolan's 96-year-old uncle still lives at Riverside Country Manor. (Ted Dillon/CBC)
Under provincial law, a personal-care home has a minimum of five residents.
A home with fewer residents can be considered a private boarding home, which is not governed by Eastern Health and does not require oversight from any provincial body.

'Please go'

On Tuesday morning, a group of cats lingered and played outdoors, while the building's signage sat on the ground near a garbage box.
When a CBC reporter knocked on the home's door, a female voice from behind the door advised him to leave: "You're on private property. Please go."
Moments later, Nolan walked across the road and agreed to an interview.
riverside
The sign for Riverside Country Manor now sits outside on the ground, near some garbage. The home was stripped of its personal care licence in July. (Ted Dillon/CBC)
After Riverside Country Manor closed, Eastern Health gave the six residents the option of either moving to a different personal-care home or being discharged from the authority's oversight and remaining at Riverside Country Manor.
Some, like Nolan's uncle, opted to stay and live out their remaining years in their home community.
According to Nolan, his uncle pays $1,950 a month to stay there — his entire pension and then some.

Licence pulled last July

Last July, Eastern Health said the decision to revoke the home's licence was made because of significant non-compliance with the personal-care home operational standards, but did not provide specifics.
As CBC News reported on Monday, government documents and inspection reports outlined a litany of alleged issues at the Mount Carmel home.
CBC News obtained those records through access to information.
cats riverside
One of the problems noted in Eastern Health's reports on the home was a pack of feral cats living outside the building. As of Tuesday, those cats remained. (Ted Dillon/CBC)
That list included delays getting medical care for a resident, failure to change soiled clothing, and "disrespectful and abusive behaviour" towards Eastern Health staff.
Between 2015 and 2016, copious complaints were made about, among other problems, a pack of feral cats living outside, the home smelling like urine, and issues with patient care.

Advertising for more residents

While Riverside Country Manor currently has fewer than five residents, there was an advertisement for the home in the local church bulletin as recently as March 5.
"Healthy dining, active living, housekeeping, high speed internet," the ad reads. "Private and semi-private rooms available. Washrooms in all bedrooms."
While Eastern Health is no longer monitoring the home, the authority said it would investigate if there was evidence the building housed five or more residents.
CBC Investigates 2


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/riverside-manor-mount-carmel-1.4036467


CBC INVESTIGATES

Urine stench, delayed medical attention, care concerns behind closure of Mount Carmel seniors home

Residents complained of lack of respect at Riverside Country Manor

By Ariana Kelland, CBC News Posted: Mar 27, 2017 7:00 AM NT Last Updated: Mar 27, 2017 7:00 AM NT
Six residents had to find alternative accommodations after Eastern Health revoked Riverside Country Manor's personal care home licence last year.
Six residents had to find alternative accommodations after Eastern Health revoked Riverside Country Manor's personal care home licence last year. (Eddy Kennedy/CBC)
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Ariana Kelland
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Ariana Kelland is a reporter with the CBC Newfoundland and Labrador bureau in St. John's.

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A seniors home in Mount Carmel, N.L., that lost its licence last year allegedly delayed getting medical care for a resident, failed to change soiled clothing, and exhibited "disrespectful and abusive behaviour" towards Eastern Health staff.
Those allegations are laid out in documents obtained by CBC News through access to information.
The records outline dozens of complaints that triggered the inspection and subsequent closure of Riverside Country Manor Personal Care Home in the St. Mary's Bay community last year.
"Riverside Country Manor continued a pattern of noncompliance with provincial standards in the following months which compromised the care and well-being of residents," Eastern Health noted in the documents.
Among the concerns raised between 2015 and 2016:
  • Allegations the home refused to pick up a patient from the Health Sciences Centre and was inappropriate with emergency room staff.
  • A pack of feral cats living outside the home, and the smell of urine inside.
  • Continued reports of disrespectful and abusive behaviour by the operator and staff towards Eastern Health.
  • Staff were not permitted to call Eastern Health with concerns about residents.
  • Soiled clothes on residents not being changed, despite the operator knowing about it.
  • Delay in obtaining medical care for a resident.
Last July, Eastern Health said the decision to revoke the home's licence was made because of a significant non-compliance with the personal-care home operational standards, but did not provide specifics.
'I had to put a mask on to go into [redacted] room because of the smell. Pampers left in the garbage for days, very dirty.'- Person interviewed by Eastern Health during inspection of Riverside Country Manor
Six residents of the home were told at the time they had to find other accommodations.
The health authority confirmed the home has not applied for a new personal-care home licence, and the prior licence is still revoked.

Warnings weren't heeded

The home was served notice by Eastern Health on Feb. 3, 2016, identifying violations of personal-care home standards and alerting the owner that an inspection would follow. Effective that date, admissions of new residents were halted.
Eastern Health staff did regular visits and a quarterly review was completed on April 12, 2016. Despite warnings from the health authority, non-compliance issues continued.  
In May, Eastern Health's regional manager confirmed a complaint that a resident did not receive appropriate care, and the investigation revealed the home was in violation of five standards.
About a month later, the operator was served notice their licence would be revoked if they couldn't comply to standards by July 8.
Eastern Health checked in four days in a row in June, and while "some progress" was noted, there were violations every day.
The situation came to a head on June 29, when Eastern Health discovered eight violations, and learned the home had five deficiencies under Service NL's fire and life safety protocols.

Feral cats living outside

Between 2015 and 2016, copious complaints were made, including a pack of feral cats living outside, the home smelling like urine, and issues with patient care.
"You have been advised to stop feeding and remove feral cats from your property. The smell of cat urine in your home has been documented numerous times," wrote the regional manager of Eastern Health's personal-care home program on May 2, 2016.
In response to those concerns, the operator said she had contacted an animal rescue group that would capture the cats in the fall.
"This is not acceptable," Eastern Health said. "You are advised to immediately take all necessary steps to rectify this issue."
Service NL also conducted an inspection that noted 10 cats living outside, and one dead cat was located outside an emergency exit.
Riverside Country Manor, Mount Carmel
Riverside Country Manor in Mount Carmel, St. Mary's Bay, has been closed since July. (Eddy Kennedy/CBC)
The health authority took issue with the "appropriate handling of residents' personal-care needs, cleanliness of resident rooms, and the smell of urine (cat and human) in the building."
The operator, meanwhile, said one of the residents refused to let staff enter to clean the room. Some residents had bowel issues that were cleaned up as soon as staff could. And there were struggles to get male residents to change their clothes and flush toilets.
Eastern Health said her responses appear as though she's holding the residents accountable when they shouldn't be.
In October 2015, a social worker noted a post in the communication log book that a resident was denied dessert for three days as a punishment. A staff member denied it.
Soon after, the communication log book, which was used to record resident complaints, such as food concerns and the smell of urine, was discontinued.
It was later revealed that the operator shredded the log book.

2 weeks without a bath

"There were continued reports from Eastern Health staff experiencing disrespectful and abusive behaviour in their interactions with the PCH Operator and [redacted]," an Eastern Health report said.
In January 2016, a resident was "reported to smell of urine, and was dirty [redacted]," the report noted.
"The complaint also indicated concerns with medication administration at Riverside."
One resident complained in 2015 that he had not received a bath in two weeks, and that he needed to see his doctor for test results.
Similar concerns were outlined by another resident, who also complained that the home was cold.

Home owner 'spitey'

Those allegations were laid out in a document titled Resident History at Riverside Country Manor.
There were complaints that the home owner was "'spitey' and left [one] resident's room [and] 'slammed the door.'"
Eastern Health noted this was in violation of standards, "as the home owner was disrespectful towards residents and violated residents' rights."
Some staff also told the health authority that the owner yelled or disrespected the elderly residents.
Riverside Country Manor Personal Care Home in Mount Carmel
Residents who had been living at Riverside Country Manor Personal Care Home in Mount Carmel were relocated. (Glenn Payette/CBC)
The inspection, which resulted in the home losing its licence, consisted of interviews with staff, families, former staff and residents. At that time of the inspection, two residents asked to leave, but requested to return afterwards.
One former staff member noted she "could not stay there any longer saying she couldn't sleep thinking about what was happening," adding one resident would "beg me to give him a bath, he was very smelly and his room was ridiculous."
The inspection found that a staff member signed night logs indicating he checked on patients on May 20, 21 and 22, when he was not even working.
In one case, the health authority learned a resident did not receive medical attention "following a fall where she hit her head and reports from staff that [personal-care home] owner cancelled an appointment for [the resident with a] physician due to resident being sick."

Fear of retribution

In interviews with Eastern Health staff in 2016, some residents noted they were fearful of the consequences of speaking out against the home.
"No, they don't respect me. They wish I wasn't here. They make me feel lousy and no appreciation," said one resident, who later asked to be transferred from the home.
However, other residents noted they felt respected and received all the care they needed, with one saying "she couldn't be treated any better."
Another interview revealed significant concerns about cleanliness.
"I had to put a mask on to go into [redacted] room because of the smell. Pampers left in the garbage for days, very dirty."
On June 10, 2016, the regional director of the long-term care program requested that the home have its licence revoked.
"Despite numerous interventions, there has been insufficient change," wrote Judy O'Keefe of Eastern Health.
Riverside Country Manor Personal Care Home was also one of 22 homes ordered by the fire commissioner in 2008 to close because they failed to install sprinklers.

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