Saturday, April 1, 2017

#ReveraAbuseDeath----Do you know of anyone who is a victim of elder abuse? Tell us your story by emailing ViewerContactToronto@globalnews.ca ------------then who does government serve? / who is helping the families? who is saving the seniors?-------------“We found Mom in a state of urgency where she had a lot if chest pains and could not sit up by herself. She asked to be taken to the hospital and the paramedics found some blood in her [underwear] and a strong odor so they thought she might have a UTI”, Melodie said. “They wanted her to get an X-ray done, so that is when I took her into the bathroom to gown her up and that is when I saw the bruises. I found she had a very large bruise on her shoulder and very large bruising on her chest. I called my husband into the bathroom, I was in shock. We were called to the hospital because of chest pains. Nobody had alerted us to the bruising.”----------------After the assessment, Melodie said she and her family were even more shocked. “They alerted us there was more bruising”, Melodie said, adding severe bruising to Carol’s stomach and vaginal area was discovered. The family said they were now even more concerned for their mother and Melodie called the police over fears something horrific had happened to her. “The day I called the police the police contacted my husband who is the [power of attorney] and told him we needed to meet my mom at the long-term care home,” she said. “They gave us a police escort to [The Scarborough Hospital] to do a sexual assault kit on my mom.” York Regional police are continuing their investigation as they await results from forensic investigators. Melodie said that due to the severe amount of pain from all the bruising, her mother-in-law had to be hospitalized for 13 days. She added that the vaginal bleeding her mother-in-law experienced lasted for eight days.--------The family is launching a lawsuit against Revera Inc. and Mackenzie Place. “Mrs. Hughes and her family will be looking to Revera for payment of damages for Mrs. Hughes’ pain and suffering, out of pocket treatment costs and any extra care costs incurred as a result of her injuries,” the family’s lawyer, Michelle Arzaga, told Global News in an email. “The family’s position is that Revera had a duty to provide a reasonably safe environment for Mrs. Hughes. Revera failed in that obligation (both contractually and at law) which is why she is looking to Revera for payment of her damages.” Melodie said the trauma from the alleged incident “put her in a state of delirium where she couldn’t talk for several days.” “Prior to this happening my mother was fairly independent. She would get up in the morning and make her bed and dress herself several times a day,” she said. “She would walk freely to the dining room. She never needed assistance in feeding. So the trauma from this just turned her info somebody else.” The lawsuit is expected to be launched on Dec. 21.

#ReveraAbuseDeath--It is simply mind boggling to me the litany of abuses at Revera that are tolerated by the federal government. Why isn't the federal government cleaning up the messes at this investment? Or does the federal government simply put pension money into dubious assets and watches the profits grow?
Is this investment not a tad dubious?
Is there no conflict of interest issues when government invests government money into a business that needs government money to do business with and profit from?
How much of the pension funds go to pay for resident care at these businesses?
Why is there no effort by the Public Service Pension Plan folks to ensure that harm does not occur to vulnerable seniors in properties that are owned by the pension plan?
Who will do the clean up of these messes?
Won't be government. Government has money in the game. Government at all levels is complicit in cover up of these problems.
Will have to be us folks.
The families.
Do you know of anyone who is a victim of elder abuse? Tell us your story by emailing ViewerContactToronto@globalnews.ca
#ReveraAbuseDeath

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I did the work
that government
in Alberta
refuses to do
so that the seniors
and handicapped citizens
are suffering
for no reason
that I can determine

I said their stories to you
so that you would change yourselves
as I have had to do
because I could no longer stay silent
I spoke for my sister
and for other families
I asked why they are second class citizens
in the continuing care system in Alberta
and I sought proof

I obtained the documents
of witnessing
and I said them to you
so that you would not be deceived
by the spin that is given to us
the proof is in the audits
we are denied
because they say the truth and not the advertisements 
of performance

I watched the streets of history
and I found the map of discovery
I went every day to observe
and investigate the mystery
I did the work 
that government 
in Alberta 
refuses to do
and I told you all what I discovered

and when I asked help
from everybody
no one came to help me
I had to keep going
I kept speaking of what I was witnessing
the do not resuscitate orders
the R3 goals of care that refused intubation
and the cadre of doctors at the Grey Nuns Hospital
determined to do the premature termination of my sister

I went to three health ministers
and begged for help
my father went from doctor to doctor
all over the city
trying to get admission to a hospital for her
we asked for help   and they denied her services
at the Grey Nuns Hospital   meanwhile we got doctors
dumping her like garbage while spinning their stories
I asked myself

if government is only for the partners
in the continuing care system
if government does not do the work of oversight
if government   upon finding non-compliances
refuses to make public these discoveries
due to the impact on the business interests of companies
then who does government serve?
who is helping the families?  who is saving the seniors?
I did the work    that government    in Alberta    refuses to do


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZDsCJ4rGD4&index=1&list=RD5ZDsCJ4rGD4
ZAZ - "Si jamais j'oublie" [Official Video]


http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/calgary/Calgary+senior+care+home+broke+failing+report+abuse+probe+finds/9483526/story.html

Calgary senior’s care home broke law by failing to report sex abuse, probe finds

MATT MCCLURE, CALGARY HERALD  02.07.2014
A provincial investigation found staff at a Calgary nursing home violated the law by failing to inform authorities when its residents were sexually abused.
The Alberta Health report also determined actions taken by management at McKenzie Towne Care Centre eight years ago were “insufficient” to halt repeated assaults by a male resident on women in the facility’s dementia unit.
“Failure to report is an offence under the Protection of Persons in Care Act and is subject to a fine or imprisonment,” the report said.
“Former management was aware of the alleged abuser’s actions, which were first evidenced in June (2005) . . . and significantly escalated over the next six months.”
Despite the finding, it appears the offences — which at the time carried a maximum fine of $2,000 or up to six months in jail — were never prosecuted.
Alberta Health officials did not respond to questions about why charges were not laid.
The son of one victim, whom the Herald has agreed not to identify, says the problems at the Revera Inc. facility might never have come to light if he hadn’t witnessed one of the assaults with his own eyes and filed the PPIC complaints.
“This is another sad example of how for-profit companies and the Alberta government care for seniors,” he said.
“Those responsible for allowing this to happen should have been charged and the government officials should have either pulled public funding or had people on site to ensure something like this never happened again.”
News of the 2006 investigation comes in the wake of provincial audits of McKenzie Towne prompted by last year’s deaths of two residents.
In both those cases, the elderly patients developed severe blood poisoning after they were left for extended periods in soiled or soaking diapers.
Health Minister Fred Horne had threatened in December to cancel Revera’s contract after the Herald first reported on the incidents.
But after last month’s audits, Horne insisted that residents were safe and there were no systemic problems at the 150-bed facility.
Shannon Stunden-Bower, research director at the Parkland Institute, said the recurring care issues at McKenzie Towne are likely linked to inadequate staffing.
Stunden-Bower co-authored a recent report that found private nursing homes in Alberta provide their residents with 30 per cent less direct care than the minimum recommended by a group of North American experts.
The report also revealed that for-profit facilities also had far fewer registered nurses than recommended to properly oversee care.
“If you don’t have enough people with the right training and supervision, then terrible things like this are going to happen,” Stunden-Bower said.
The sexual abuse investigation in 2006 found the male resident assaulted at least three women in McKenzie Towne’s dementia ward during the six months he lived in the secure unit.
Front-line staff and the facility’s director of care admitted there had been a number of incidents where the man was observed “firmly grabbing” the breasts of female patients.
“The behaviour significantly escalated through the end of 2005 and into January 2006 wherein five separate incident reports were submitted,” the report said.
Caregivers said they attempted to redirect the male resident when he behaved inappropriately.
But a nurse on the ward said staff shortages meant the facility was unable to provide enough one-to-one supervision to prevent repeat attacks, a statement the investigator dismissed as a “rationalization for insufficient intervention.”
The son of one victim decided to file a complaint after he saw the man fondling a bedridden female.
He told the PPIC investigator that staff members he confronted about the abuse said they had been told to “remain silent in informing family members” if their loved ones were assaulted.
“From the director of care right down to the front-line staff,” he said he was left with the impression that they did not seem to “appreciate the gravity of these incidents or even have policies to deal with the situation,” he said in a recent interview.
The report recommended that staff be properly trained on the PPIC legislation and how to deal with and prevent abuse.
Given the large number of caregivers for whom English is a second language, the facility said then that it would not be feasible to have them record incidents on a resident’s chart.
The investigator was also critical of delays in providing written information about facility policies to relatives of residents.
“During previous unrelated investigations at this facility, reference was made to the “Handbook” that was in the process of being produced,” the report said.
“The lack of a reference document . . . appears to contribute to family confusion and misinformation regarding a client’s care and placement.”
Officials with Revera — which operates 242 seniors facilities across North America, including 15 in Alberta — were not available to be interviewed for this story.
But the company issued a statement saying all staff, regardless of their literacy, can now use icons on point of care computer terminals to log an incident when they see it happen.
“Duty to report any alleged, potential, suspected or witnessed abuse is clear in our policies,” the statement said.
“It’s clear from the findings . . . that this situation was unacceptable and we regret any distress that this may have caused the resident(s) and family involved.”
The investigation report indicates that after the son’s complaints were filed, McKenzie Towne promptly transferred the male resident to another facility where he would not have contact with females.
It also shows that in the wake of the investigation, the nursing home finally produced a handbook for families, hired a new care director and promised the province it would mend the relationship with the son who complained through mediation.
But in the subsequent 18 months before his mother died, the son says he tried in vain to arrange a discussion with McKenzie Towne’s management.
“I was never able to sit down with anyone and hear what they were doing to prevent these sort of incidents,” he said. “It made me wonder whether they really had a plan to keep vulnerable residents like my mother safe.”
mmcclure@calgaryherald.com


http://www.calgaryherald.com/monitor+nursing+home+after+senior+left+soiled+diaper+days+Wildrose+wants+independent+seniors+advocate/9237230/story.html

AHS to monitor nursing home after senior left in soiled diaper for two days; Wildrose wants independent seniors’ advocate

JAMES WOOD AND DARCY HENTON, CALGARY HERALD  12.03.2013

AHS to monitor nursing home after senior left in soiled diaper for two days; Wildrose wants independent seniors’ advocate

Cassie Liska at McKenzie Towne Long Time Care by Revera centre in Calgary Friday, Nov. 29, 2013. Liska is the daughter of a former resident who suffered blood poisoning at the centre.

STUART GRADON / CALGARY HERALD

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Health Minister Fred Horne said Monday the system failed in the case of a 73-year-old Calgary woman with bedsores who was left in a soiled diaper in a nursing home for two days after resisting care.

At the legislature, Horne told reporters the situation of Violet MacDonald raises significant questions about how well Alberta Health Services is monitoring the care provided in nursing homes that it contracts with and the provincial standards in place for such facilities.

A provincial report found MacDonald — who was later rushed to hospital in February with severe blood poisoning after the dressings on her wounds went unchanged for two days — had not been provided adequate medical attention at McKenzie Towne Care Centre, owned by Revera Inc.

“In this case, the system has failed this resident and we will do our best to find out why,” Horne said in question period when the case was raised by the Wildrose Party.

Horne said AHS will be on-site at the McKenzie Towne centre to oversee the service being provided until recommendations in the provincial report — calling for the facility to revise its wound management policies and consult with geriatric mental health and ethics experts — are implemented.

He has also asked the province’s Health Quality Council to expand its existing probe into quality assurance in the homecare sector to review continuing care facilities.

The government will also look at the possibility of the provincial Health Department taking a larger role in monitoring and enforcing quality standards.

The provincial investigation was prompted by a complaint from the family of MacDonald, who suffered from mild dementia.

It showed that at times, MacDonald refused care, but still found the facility failed to provide the ailing senior with adequate medical attention, defined as abuse under provincial legislation.

“This is a completely unacceptable situation in any facility in Alberta, I don’t care if it’s public or private or not-for-profit,” Horne said.

Joanne Dykeman, Revera’s vice-president of clinical services and quality, said Monday the company apologized for what MacDonald and her family went through, and acknowledged the case did not meet its standards of care.

“We are deeply committed to making system improvements,” she said.

However, Dykeman said the case was “troubling and complex,” given MacDonald’s health issues and the difficulties of a patient who refused care.

“There were these extenuating circumstances of her own treatment decisions and wishes. It made it very complicated,” she said.

Dykeman said Revera, which is a private business wholly owned by the federal government’s Public Sector Pension Investment Board, follows the regulations and quality standards set by AHS.

MacDonald’s daughter, Cassie Liska, has raised concerns that lack of training, management oversight and staff numbers at the Revera facility contributed to her mother’s poor treatment.

“I’m here to tell her story today with the hope that changes can be made so nobody ever has to endure the abuse that my mother did,” Liska said in a legislature news conference with the Wildrose Party on Monday.

“I am ... scared for anyone who has a loved one that they are not able to be with 24-7.”

After five months in an acute care facility for treatment of her infection, MacDonald was sent back to McKenzie Towne in June.

MacDonald has since died.

The Opposition said the case showed why an independent seniors’ advocate is needed in Alberta.

Wildrose Leader Danielle Smith said the problems within the senior’s health system are comparable to the issues raised by a Calgary Herald-Edmonton Journal investigation into the child welfare system, which showed there were more deaths of children in care than had been reported by the province.

“There does not appear to be tracking of the number of patients who die in care from non-natural causes,” Smith said.

“There doesn’t appear to be accurate tracking of hospitalizations that are occurring because of neglect or inappropriate care. There doesn’t appear to be a consistent way of initiating investigations.”

jwood@calgaryherald.com


http://elderadvocates.ca/deadly-neglect-at-revera-mckenzie-towne-centre-calgary/

Deadly neglect at Revera, Mckenzie Towne Centre, Calgary

Home > Blog > Deadly neglect at Revera, Mckenzie Towne Centre, Calgary
– Violet MacDonald was a resident with dementia at the Centre.
She died in October, after being sent to hospital for Septicemia
{blood poisoning} caused by bedsores that had been
neglected for so long, her flesh had begun to blacken and decay.
This LTC is run by REVERA, a multi-national corporation
that together with Extendicare owns nearly half of the Long Term Care
sector in Alberta. It should be known that our tax dollars help provide
corporations, such as REVERA, with valuable infrastructure.
The death did not become public until two months later.
– Are Calgary Police Service investigating the deadly neglect?
-Has a Fatality Inquiry been scheduled to review the circumstances
which surrounded this death?


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-nursing-home-to-change-wound-care-after-resident-deaths-1.2510287

Calgary nursing home to change wound care after resident deaths

Government audits show multiple problems at McKenzie Towne seniors' home

The Canadian Press Posted: Jan 24, 2014 2:53 PM MT Last Updated: Jan 24, 2014 2:53 PM MT
Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne launched an investigation into the southeast Calgary nursing home in December. The results are now back and reveal some serious problems with wound control and patient documentation.
Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne launched an investigation into the southeast Calgary nursing home in December. The results are now back and reveal some serious problems with wound control and patient documentation. (CBC)
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Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne says a nursing home where two residents died from badly-infected sores over the last year is now under deadline to make changes in how it takes care of wounds and dressings.
The McKenzie Towne Care Centre in Calgary is to track wounds on a computer to make sure no one is missed and a provincial consultant is to check in regularly, Horne said Friday.
Violet MacDonald
Violet MacDonald, 73, died in hospital last October. (Supplied)
The centre also plans to give staff more training, implement updated care plans for residents and explore ways to give families more say.
The 150-bed care centre is run privately by Revera Inc. under contract to the province.
Horne had said in December when reports of the deaths first surfaced that he was considering pulling Revera's contract.
But following audits by his department and Alberta Health Services, which handles front-line care, Horne is satisfied that such drastic action isn't required.
"I don't think the findings of the AHS report, at least as they've been explained to me, suggest that there's a systemic problem in the facility," he said. "In fact, it reinforces for me that the residents who are there are safe.
"There were some quality issues identified, but there's action being taken."
The audits found:
  • Gaps in documenting ongoing resident care and in basic resident information.
  • Management of aggressive and violent behaviour of residents was not up to standard in some cases.
  • Oxygen and chemicals were left unsafely stored in unlocked rooms.

Residents died from blood poisoning

The investigation also found wound care practices weren't always being adequately followed.
"In some areas there would not have been the specialist required with the knowledge around some of the very, very complex wounds that we found in this circumstance," said Brenda Huband with Alberta Health Services. "So we've been able to provide some of the specialists in wound care from Albera Health Services to go in and support, train and educate and ensure that those resources are available at that site."
The audits were ordered after two residents died from blood poisoning.
The first case, that of Violet MacDonald, came to light when her family went public in December with their concerns. Relatives said MacDonald, who was 73 and who had dementia, was left in a soiled diaper for two days last February. They said that infected existing bed sores and caused blood poisoning.
MacDonald was treated in hospital, but was bed-ridden thereafter and died in October.
Nana and me
Breanne Sinclair sits with her grandmother Wyonne Somers nine days before she was hospitalized. It was the last time she was able to have a conversation with her "nana." (Submitted by Breanne Sinclair)
Relatives also said McKenzie Towne staff misled them about how serious the wounds were and once barred the family entrance to MacDonald's room by propping a chair against the door.
The family of Wyonne Somers, 75, said she died last fall after she developed a severe urinary infection and leg sores.

'Changes need to be made'

Breanne Sinclair says she still misses her grandmother, but is relieved the reports identify problems with wound care and patient documentation.
"It's obvious that there's things that are lacking in the facility," said Sinclair. "My question is once the heat is off of them are these changes going to continue to be implemented and monitored?"
Sinclair says the problems would never have been investigated or uncovered had families like hers not spoken out.
"Changes need to be made," she said. "[The health minister] needs to take this seriously. This isn't an isolated incident, if that's what he's insinuating."
Sinclair believes there are widespread problems with Alberta's long-term care system and says the only fix is tougher monitoring.
Revera says an independent third party review of the facility is also being conducted by Dr. Paul Katz, a recognized Canadian leader in geriatric care. The review results are expected by April.
"We take our responsibilities and obligations as long term care providers very seriously," said Revera in a release.
"We are committed to continuous improvement and to providing the best possible resident care through on-going collaboration with Alberta Health Services and the Ministry of Health."
Revera runs 15 seniors homes in Alberta and 242 across North America.
Thank you for voting!
Yes. 90.11%  (1,495 votes)
No. 1.81%  (30 votes)
Only in some of them. 8.08%  (134 votes)
Total Votes: 1,659
https://www.facebook.com/ABSeniorNeglect/photos/rpp.532461186850657/627853453978096/?type=3&theater

This is a photo of my Mom, Wyonne Somers one week after arriving at McKenzie Towne Care Centre in May 2013.

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This photo was taken just days before my Mom passed away in October 2013, 5 short months after entering McKenzie Towne Care Centre in Calgary. Her body had been decimated by the sepsis. Something that could have been prevented IF she had received timely, appropriate and effective care from the wound nurse and other supposedly qualified staff. Notice the obvious deterioration in her appearance in just five months. Is this what Dr. Katz, the geriatric expert retained by Revera to do an independent investigation, refers to as receiving appropriate care in the June 5th Calgary Herald article? Let us know your thoughts.




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http://globalnews.ca/news/2408307/family-in-shock-after-elderly-mother-severely-bruised-at-newmarket-nursing-home/



December 17, 2015 6:17 pm
Updated: December 17, 2015 6:20 pm

Family in shock after elderly mother severely bruised at Newmarket nursing home

WATCH ABOVE: A family is in shock after finding their elderly mother with severe bruising while under the care of Newmarket nursing home. In this exclusive report, Angie Seth speaks to the family who allege their mother was abused and are now planning to file a lawsuit.
 A A 

TORONTO — A Newmarket, Ont. family is looking for answers after their mother was found with severe bruising to her upper and lower body.

Since July 2015, 75-year-old Carol Hughes has been living at Mackenzie Place, a long-term care facility run by Revera Inc. The family said she suffers from dementia.

On the night of Nov. 17, Mackenzie Place called Carol’s daughter-in-law, Melodie Hughes, to tell her they were taking Carol to the hospital because she was suffering chest pains.










Melodie and her husband rushed to the hospital concerned Carol had suffered a heart attack. But what they discovered was far worse.
In a detailed interview with Global News, Melodie recounts what happened that night and the following days.
“We found Mom in a state of urgency where she had a lot if chest pains and could not sit up by herself. She asked to be taken to the hospital and the paramedics found some blood in her [underwear] and a strong odor so they thought she might have a UTI”, Melodie said.
“They wanted her to get an X-ray done, so that is when I took her into the bathroom to gown her up and that is when I saw the bruises. I found she had a very large bruise on her shoulder and very large bruising on her chest. I called my husband into the bathroom, I was in shock. We were called to the hospital because of chest pains. Nobody had alerted us to the bruising.”
After finishing up at the hospital, Melodie and her husband took Carol back to the nursing home. Melodie says she asked the nursing staff about the bruising and if her mother-in-law had a fall.
She said the staff had no knowledge of a fall and there was no documentation to indicate Carol had fallen that night.
The next day, Melodie met with the executive director of the long-term care facility to discuss her concerns.
Melodie said that after she informed Mackenzie Place about the bruising, the nursing staff performed a head-to-toe assessment of Carol, as required by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care when a patient is allegedly injured.
After the assessment, Melodie said she and her family were even more shocked.
“They alerted us there was more bruising”, Melodie said, adding severe bruising to Carol’s stomach and vaginal area was discovered.
The family said they were now even more concerned for their mother and Melodie called the police over fears something horrific had happened to her.
“The day I called the police the police contacted my husband who is the [power of attorney] and told him we needed to meet my mom at the long-term care home,” she said.
“They gave us a police escort to [The Scarborough Hospital] to do a sexual assault kit on my mom.”
York Regional police are continuing their investigation as they await results from forensic investigators.
Melodie said that due to the severe amount of pain from all the bruising, her mother-in-law had to be hospitalized for 13 days. She added that the vaginal bleeding her mother-in-law experienced lasted for eight days.
Mackenzie Place said they had no knowledge of the bruising. They conducted their own investigation after being immediately informed and questioned by the Hughes family.
In a three-page letter outlined to the Hughes family, the long-term care facility provided a full recount of the events of Nov. 17.
They concluded that Carol sustained the bruises due to a fall from getting out of the bathtub. Yet there were no witness accounts to support that theory.
“We extend our sincere apologies to all involved in this difficult situation and are cooperating with all investigations,” Revera Inc. said in a statement to Global News.
“To respect client confidentiality, and because there is an ongoing investigation with York Regional Police, we are unable to disclose the specifics of this matter.”
The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care conducted an investigation related to concerns raised by the family.
The ministry completed their review and issued three written notices to the home regarding late reporting and assessments. There were no findings related to abuse and the ministry said it would “continue to support all investigations.”
But the Hughes family say they want answers.
“They basically told us they do not know what happened to her. They suspect it was a fall,” Melodie said.
“The doctors at our hospital told my husband and I and our family that there is just no supporting documentation to say that this was a fall.”
The family is launching a lawsuit against Revera Inc. and Mackenzie Place.
“Mrs. Hughes and her family will be looking to Revera for payment of damages for Mrs. Hughes’ pain and suffering, out of pocket treatment costs and any extra care costs incurred as a result of her injuries,” the family’s lawyer, Michelle Arzaga, told Global News in an email.
“The family’s position is that Revera had a duty to provide a reasonably safe environment for Mrs. Hughes. Revera failed in that obligation (both contractually and at law) which is why she is looking to Revera for payment of her damages.”
Melodie said the trauma from the alleged incident “put her in a state of delirium where she couldn’t talk for several days.”
“Prior to this happening my mother was fairly independent. She would get up in the morning and make her bed and dress herself several times a day,” she said.
“She would walk freely to the dining room. She never needed assistance in feeding. So the trauma from this just turned her info somebody else.”
The lawsuit is expected to be launched on Dec. 21.
“Somebody has to be accountable and in some form I need to see justice for my mom,” Melodie said.  “And for the several other elderly that have gone through something like this, that don’t have a voice.”
Do you know of anyone who is a victim of elder abuse? Tell us your story by emailing ViewerContactToronto@globalnews.ca 
https://www.facebook.com/ABSeniorNeglect/
And the irresponsibility, neglect & abuse continue at Revera ...


A 99-year-old Edmonton woman was unexpectedly dropped by Revera, the new home care provider she was assigned to just two weeks ago.
CBC.CA

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Here is the latest W5 investigative report about Revera's continued mistreatment, neglect and abuse of seniors in it's many "care" facilities across Canada. Amani Oakley, an Ontario lawyer that specializes in medical malpractice, is representing 30 families in a class action lawsuit against Revera. Please watch and pass this extremely important information along to anyone and everyone you know who has a loved one in a Revera facility OR may be considering placement of a loved one into a Revera property. This episode of W5 can also be viewed on You Tube by searching: Official W5.


W5 is Canada's most-watched current affairs and documentary program, tackling major stories and investigations.
CTVNEWS.CA

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ttp://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/lawsuit-against-revera-nursing-homes-says-father-died-from-lack-of-care-1.3812577

Lawsuit against Revera Nursing Homes says father died from lack of care

Allegations include negligent care, inadequate investigations and failure to meet ministry care standards

By Natalie Nanowski, Andrea Janus, CBC News Posted: Oct 20, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 20, 2016 5:36 PM ET
Arthur Ross Jones was a resident at Main Street Terrace, a Revera nursing home in Toronto. His family alleges he fell twice at the facility but was left to suffer with pressure sores with no medication or assessments. Two weeks after the first fall, he would be found unresponsive with a stage IV ulcer.
Arthur Ross Jones was a resident at Main Street Terrace, a Revera nursing home in Toronto. His family alleges he fell twice at the facility but was left to suffer with pressure sores with no medication or assessments. Two weeks after the first fall, he would be found unresponsive with a stage IV ulcer. (Submitted by Amani Oakley)
A multi-million dollar class-action lawsuit has been launched against Revera Nursing Homes after a woman says her father died from an infected bed sore that went unnoticed and festered into an oozing stage-four ulcer. 
Amani Oakley, the lawyer leading the suit, says the father of her client, Lori DeKervor, was taken to hospital in May 2014 after being found unresponsive in his room at the Main Street Terrace nursing home in Toronto's east end.
Arthur Ross Jones, who went by "Ross," was a resident at Main Street Terrace for about 11 months. His family alleges he fell twice at the facility but was never examined by a doctor and was left to suffer with pressure sores that resulted from him being bed-bound. Two weeks after his first fall on May 12, he was found unresponsive. He died about a month later on June 8, 2014.
"He died a painful 13th-century death, while being looked after by a giant business entity that is making a ton of money on the basis of its promise to deliver reliable, professional health care to our parents," DeKervor said Wednesday in a release. "He deserved better than this."
During a news conference at Queen's Park on Thursday, DeKervor said she was told about her father's falls but was assured by staff that they were minor. She then got a call saying that he had pneumonia. She flew in from San Diego and found her dad in pain.
"He would be screaming and moaning," DeKervor said. "Sometimes he would say, 'stop the suffering.' And I just didn't feel that pneumonia would cause that kind of agony." 
She also noticed a bad odour in her father's room. She stripped him of his clothes and found the oozing wound on his backside. She asked the doctor what it was, and she was told it was a sacral ulcer.
"I had never been made aware that this wound existed," she said. "And I was shocked."
After DeKervor returned home she reviewed her father's medical records. She found that the only pain medication that had been ordered for him was Tylenol. Oakley said there is no evidence he ever received it.
"This is something you would think would happen in some sort of developing country where there are no medical supplies, or in some sort of camp in a war-torn country," DeKervor said. "This isn't something that would happen here."

Allegations include negligent care, inadequate investigations

Currently, DeKervor is the only name on the class-action suit, but Oakley anticipates others will join. On Thursday, Oakley said her office has received numerous calls from people inquiring about the legal action.
In the last few years, the lawyer says her firm has received numerous complaints regarding Revera Nursing Homes and that's why she decided to launch a suit against the company. The allegations against the company include negligent care, inadequate investigations and failure to meet ministry care standards.
Oakley also alleges that paperwork and assessments required by Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-term Care when falls happen in nursing homes were not done.
"Revera is not being taken by surprise here," Oakley told reporters Thursday. "Revera has had notice of these concerns for years and years and years, whether it be directly from relatives who've complained, the residents who've complained or media stories."
The statement of claim was issued by the court in June, Oakley said, and Revera was served earlier this week.

Company says case has no merit

The system currently in place in Canadian courts is not sufficient to respond to concerns like DeKorver's, Oakley said Wednesday. "Courts award very little for pain and suffering. If a person passes away from their injuries, their case drops down to very small numbers because there's no major care component."
During Thursday's news conference, Oakley explained that in a civil action, the court seeks to assign a monetary amount to pain and suffering, loss of income and other factors. But for seniors, some of those factors no longer apply, such as loss of income because they are likely no longer working, future care costs because of their age, or their ability to care for dependents. 
As she considered taking on the case, Oakley said her office's investigation into the company turned up numerous reports similar to Jones's experience.
"We found quite a number of instances of cases of Revera residents being injured, being left unattended, being allowed to fall. Serious situations. For example, one woman ended up with maggots in a wound in a Revera nursing home," Oakley said.
Revera owns homes across the country and says that it provides proper care to its residents.  
"As this matter is before the courts, and with respect for the system and for all parties involved, we cannot speak to the specifics of the lawsuit," said John Beaney, vice president of operations for Revera Ontario.
"We do not believe, however, that this case has merit and intend to participate in the court process."
On Thursday, Oakley called the lawsuit "a game-changer" and the first of its kind in Canada.
"I think that given the sheer magnitude of people coming forward with concerns, it makes sense to join up as a group and see if we can resolve this thing as a group."



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