Thursday, April 13, 2017

Children’s Services Minister Danielle Larivee said the government is taking things one step at a time and with its eyes on the budget.--------- Julie Ali · University of Alberta Hope we fire the entire crew at the end of this junk. Pre-election media attention at its finest. We don't see any interest in the most vulnerable citizens such as those in the continuing care system. But of course there is money for the kids in daycare so parents can work. Why don't we have money for the seniors in senior care? I guess the seniors don't make for good photo opportunities do they? And the election promise of 2,000 long term care beds? I guess it just vanished. Poof. Like · Reply · Apr 8, 2017 11:10pm Neil West Are you saying that their term is up? They can't still do those things? Like · Reply · 40 mins Julie Ali · University of Alberta Neil West Sure they can change things but I doubt that the will is present for them to do this. Their record to date is not inspiring. In terms of the 2,000 long term care beds they were actually decreasing long term care beds in Sundre until public resistance resulted in a change of action. With reference to unmet seniors' needs such as requests to deal with retribution issues in continuing care there was a weak response by Sarah Hoffman for a banning policy and an internal to AHS appeal process. I don't see how having a policy to ban folks and an internal process to tidy up loose ends is a solution to unjust acts of banning by continuing care providers do you? A far more equitable matter would be to ensure that the legislation used to ban folks-the Trespass to Premises legislation is amended to ensure an independent appeal process but government appears to want to have the hammer to use on citizen ants so it has not bothered to amend the legislation. This is curious to me since the purpose of the MLAs is to provide legislation and legislation changes to help citizens and if they can make legislation at the speed of light that benefits the NDP folks like the donations legislation then why not legislation for families impacted by retribution in continuing care? Recently the Elder Advocates of Alberta met with the Justice Minister and colleagues to ask for increased oversight and transparency with reference to power of attorney arrangements to ensure that some protections are in place for seniors at risk of financial abuse. The ministry refused to consider the registry and suggested that abused seniors go to court without any access to their own cash. Not a good solution in my opinion. The record of the NDP folks is poor and the placebo office creation of the Seniors Advocate doesn't do much to improve the poor record. It would also help if the Seniors Minister actually met with Seniors advocates like Ruth Adria who is an unpaid volunteer working tirelessly on behalf of seniors doing the work government is not doing. In addition the Ministry of Justice should have the courtesy to respond to Ms. Adria's request for solutions to the POA abuses that are problematic for all seniors and especially for those living in the continuing care system as noted in here: http://www.ascha.com/.../CCTransitionsReviewanRecommendat... Transitions in Continuing Care Report and Recommendations for Improvement Prepared by: Transitions in Continuing Care Working Group May 28, 2014 Outstanding financial issues may prohibit transfer to another site. In addition, there is no recourse for an operator when an Enduring Power of Attorney is in effect and the appointed attorney is not acting in the best interest of the resident. **** The work of Ms. Adria, a recent award winner from the John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights is a model---that government should strive to emulate instead of wasting decades covering up the problems of the system and their own failures to deal wtih these problems. ww.jhcentre.org/news-blog This year’s awards recipients are Robert P. Lee Gerald L. Gall Award 2016 Paula Kirman Human Rights Champion 2016 Ruth Adria Human Rights Champion 2016 Kristina De Guzman Human Rights Champion 2016 Roy Pogorzelski Human Rights Champion 2016 The John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights envisions a world that manifests a culture of peace and human rights in which the dignity of every person is respected, valued and celebrated. We work to advance a culture of peace and human rights through educational programs and activities, community collaboration and relationship building guided by the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. http://elderadvocates.ca/ Like · Reply · Just now · Edited

Neil West
Are you saying that their term is up? They can't still do those things?
I guess I am saying this in a way.
The NDP folks had the chance to be open and accountable with us but instead chose the good old Tory way of secrecy and double crossing us.
In my books as a stay at home mummy this indicates the NDP folks are not living their values.
They may be nice folks like my MLA is --Dr. Bob Turner but they are pretty clueless about building relationships.
You don't build relationships by ignoring us for years as the MLA for Riverview has done in the case of Ruth Adria.
You don't build relationships by signing off on the work of an MLA as Dr. Bob did by handing me over to Hoffman and crew at Alberta Health.
You especially don't build relationships by meeting with us with the minds already made up as in the case of the Justice minister and crew who won't be doing a registry for power of attorney contracts but have no better solutions to the problems of financial abuse other than to tell seniors who have no access to their money to go hire a lawyer.
Genuine human contact and help provided to constituents is all politics really is. It doesn't in the end matter how much gets done as verified by the work of the Hancock who was a nice MLA but not very useful in getting things done. However Hancock did sometimes answer his mail and when needed he did pony up the help as in the case of my younger son where he wrote a letter as the education minister to say my son could get an IPP. That is being there when it counts.
The MLAs I have encountered are all nice people. But they need to be doing work. So far in the continuing care system there is no work done or the work is spurious and ineffectual like the banning policy that targets the citizens and makes no mention of the retribution side of the issue. It's a problem that government has not learned from the firing of the PCs and we have to fire a new group of folks to reiterate this message--we're the bosses. When we don't get what we require, we fire. And when the NDP folks already know of the problems in continuing care and simply ignore them until it is convenient--like just before the next election -we understand we are being played and played.
Not a good way to be in the world.
http://edmontonjournal.com/news/local-news/premier-notley-set-to-unveil-centres-picked-for-affordable-daycare-program?fb_comment_id=fbc_1406010659444933_1409039442475388_1409039442475388#fcac9ad5b20148


NDP announce additional $25-a-day daycare spots across 22 Alberta centres

Published on: April 6, 2017 | Last Updated: April 6, 2017 7:26 PM MDT
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Affordable Child Care in Alberta
The Alberta government announced Thursday April 6, 2017 that 22 pilot Early Learning and Child Care Centre will receive funding to demonstrate the importance and viability of $25-a-day child care in Alberta.
Premier Rachel Notley unveiled daycare locations Thursday that will host the province’s $25-a-day childcare pilot program, as she was flanked by about 20 children working intently on arts and crafts.
The $10-million program creates about 1,300 daycare spots across the province in 22 centres. About 250 of those spots will be in Edmonton; the government expects about 119 new childcare jobs will be created.
The pilots are designed to test out different childcare arrangements, with the government hoping to introduce universal $25-a-day childcare when the province’s finances allow for it.
The facilities chosen for the pilot will offer all their spots for $25 a day and it will be left to each daycare to decide how to select people for the openings.
“We know they’ll be oversubscribed. To be clear, these are pilots. We know that they don’t meet the demand,” said Notley, speaking at the Intercultural Child and Family Centre in central Edmonton. Children wondered freely through the news conference, even interrupting it at one point to show off a particularly good piece of artwork to the premier.
The daycare spaces include 30 in Anzac, 68 in Bonnyville, 75 in Camrose, 36 at Edmonton’s ABC Head Start, 40 at Edmonton’s Africa Centre, 71 at Edmonton’s Bissell Child Care Centre, 63 at Edmonton’s Intercultural Child Centre, 40 at Edmonton’s Oliver Centre, 61 in Fairview, 28 in Grande Prairie, 81 in Lac La Biche, 96 in Peace River, 34 in Provost and 77 in Westlock.
Affordable child care was one of the key planks in the NDP’s election platform but, like other promises, it has been slow to get off the ground due to the province’s finances.
Children’s Services Minister Danielle Larivee said the government is taking things one step at a time and with its eyes on the budget.
Taking some the stress off Alberta’s books was a $7-billion commitment to childcare over 10 years in the federal budget. The government expects about $30 million to $70 million of that money will be sent Alberta’s way.
“We’re certainly hopeful that the dollars the federal government has promised will be able to expand this,” said Larivee. “We also need to do the evaluation to make sure that we roll it out in a way that makes sense across the province broadly.”
The government estimates about 357 Albertans will be able to join the workforce due to the additional daycare spots.
“We expect we’ll be getting phone calls right away because this is a wonderful thing for parents,” said Carole Massing, president of the board at the Intercultural Child and Family Centre.
It also means the childcare workers will be getting a pay increase, said Massing.
“We’ve been here for seven years and the people who have been with us have never had a raise. It’s very well-deserved,” said Massing.
sxthomson@postmedia.com
twitter.com/stuartxthomson
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Julie Ali ·
Hope we fire the entire crew at the end of this junk. Pre-election media attention at its finest. We don't see any interest in the most vulnerable citizens such as those in the continuing care system. But of course there is money for the kids in daycare so parents can work. Why don't we have money for the seniors in senior care? I guess the seniors don't make for good photo opportunities do they? And the election promise of 2,000 long term care beds? I guess it just vanished. Poof.
Neil West
Are you saying that their term is up? They can't still do those things?
LikeReply40 mins
Julie Ali ·
Neil West Sure they can change things but I doubt that the will is present for them to do this.
Their record to date is not inspiring.
In terms of the 2,000 long term care beds they were actually decreasing long term care beds in Sundre until public resistance resulted in a change of action.

With reference to unmet seniors' needs such as requests to deal with retribution issues in continuing care there was a weak response by Sarah Hoffman for a banning policy and an internal to AHS appeal process.
I don't see how having a policy to ban folks and an internal process to tidy up loose ends is a solution to unjust acts of banning by continuing care providers do you? A far more equitable matter would be to ensure that the legislation used to ban folks-the Trespass to Premises legislation is amended to ensure an independent appeal process but government appears to want to have the hammer to use on citizen ants so it has not bothered to amend the legislation. This is curious to me since the purpose of the MLAs is to provide legislation and legislation changes to help citizens and if they can make legislation at the speed of light that benefits the NDP folks like the donations legislation then why not legislation for families impacted by retribution in continuing care?

Recently the Elder Advocates of Alberta met with the Justice Minister and colleagues to ask for increased oversight and transparency with reference to power of attorney arrangements to ensure that some protections are in place for seniors at risk of financial abuse. The ministry refused to consider the registry and suggested that abused seniors go to court without any access to their own cash. Not a good solution in my opinion.

The record of the NDP folks is poor and the placebo office creation of the Seniors Advocate doesn't do much to improve the poor record. It would also help if the Seniors Minister actually met with Seniors advocates like Ruth Adria who is an unpaid volunteer working tirelessly on behalf of seniors doing the work government is not doing. In addition the Ministry of Justice should have the courtesy to respond to Ms. Adria's request for solutions to the POA abuses that are problematic for all seniors and especially for those living in the continuing care system as noted in here:

http://www.ascha.com/.../CCTransitionsReviewanRecommendat...

Transitions in Continuing Care Report
and
Recommendations for Improvement
Prepared by:
Transitions in Continuing Care Working Group
May 28, 2014
Outstanding financial issues may prohibit transfer to another site. In addition, there is no recourse for an operator when an Enduring Power of Attorney is in effect and the
appointed attorney is not acting in the best interest of the resident.
****

The work of Ms. Adria, a recent award winner from the John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights is a model---that government should strive to emulate instead of wasting decades covering up the problems of the system and their own failures to deal wtih these problems.

ww.jhcentre.org/news-blog

This year’s awards recipients are

Robert P. Lee
Gerald L. Gall Award 2016

Paula Kirman
Human Rights Champion 2016

Ruth Adria
Human Rights Champion 2016

Kristina De Guzman
Human Rights Champion 2016

Roy Pogorzelski
Human Rights Champion 2016

The John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights envisions a world that manifests a culture of peace and human rights in which the dignity of every person is respected, valued and celebrated. We work to advance a culture of peace and human rights through educational programs and activities, community collaboration and relationship building guided by the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
http://elderadvocates.ca/
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