Monday, April 17, 2017

But Anand Sharma, president of the northern Alberta chapter of the Canadian Condominium Institute (CCI), said the group is set to lobby the Alberta government to uphold age discrimination exemptions in housing. He said the CCI wants to protect seniors-only exemptions, but acknowledges the unintended consequence might be upholding the adult-only ones as well.-------- Julie Ali · University of Alberta While I respect that folks want to have peace and quiet I don't really believe that this is a human right. It's more of a human right in my mind to be allowed to live any place folks want to live without age discrimination present. As such I don't support age discrimination in terms of tenancy. I see no reason for any developer putting in caveats to prohibit tenancy to families with young kids. For the Canadian Condominium Institute to lobby the GOA to maintain age restrictions seems a rather regressive move on their part. http://www.calgaryherald.com/kids.../13306415/story.html But Anand Sharma, president of the northern Alberta chapter of the Canadian Condominium Institute (CCI), said the group is set to lobby the Alberta government to uphold age discrimination exemptions in housing. He said the CCI wants to protect seniors-only exemptions, but acknowledges the unintended consequence might be upholding the adult-only ones as well. *********** Even if there are only a few buildings that have the adults only requirement my question is why should we protect the privilege of this group of citizens? I see no need for the seniors only or the adults only exemption; it's discriminatory and it is elitist. For eg, if you a student and there is a shortage of housing opportunities--well then an empty apartment at a seniors only building should be available to that student. It's not as if the seniors are going to be impacted by having young folks around and multi-generation living might actually improve the quality of lives of seniors and adults. Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society worked hard to get age discrimination eliminated in Alberta---mainly with reference to seniors issues ----but it seems that elimination of age discriminiation is also necessary for families.-------

Should age exemptions be present in housing choices? In my opinion, nope. Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society worked hard and got the GOA to get off it's rump to eliminate this sort of age discrimination.
It's time families spoke up and said this sort of elite requirements for housing isn't necessary and why should we allow it?
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#AgeDiscrimination---When Ruth Adria applied to the GOA for an end to age discrimination she was mainly thinking of seniors' issues.
But there also appears to be a subtext to this matter which is that there are seniors only and adults only housing in Alberta.
Its time to get rid of this sort of discriminatory junk.
I see no reason for the seniors and adults only housing exemption in Alberta do you?
Why if folks think that peace and quiet -away from kids is necessary then they can buy a farm and live there.
It's important to understand that housing is neutral --if we so decide it to be and that age discrimination is not and should not be allowed in Alberta with reference to housing options.
ns.

Alberta is the last province in Canada to allow developers, condo boards and landlords to discriminate on who is allowed to live where based on age, except seniors
CALGARYHERALD.COM

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http://www.calgaryherald.com/kids+condos+still+alberta+brewing+fight+looms+over+legal+discrimination/13306415/story.html

Kids and condos still don’t mix in Alberta: Brewing fight looms over legal age-discrimination

TIM QUERENGESSER, SPECIAL TO FINANCIAL POST, FINANCIAL POST  04.17.2017
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Michael Janz and Sally Tang pose with their baby boy, Miles, at Hodgson Park in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday, April 13, 2017. The family has been given eight months to find a new place to live because their condo building doesn't allow children. / FINANCIAL POST
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Michael Janz and Sally Tang pose with their baby boy, Miles, at Hodgson Park in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday, April 13, 2017. / FINANCIAL POST
Raj and Rakesh Dhunna have played a big role in rejuvenating downtown Edmonton
Rakesh and his son Raj Dhunna have played a big role in rejuvenating downtown Edmonton. / FINANCIAL POST
0415 biz free condos
Caitlin McElhone, left, Scott Jendruck, right, and their son, Mason Jendruck, 2, are photographed in the urban neighbourhood of Grandin in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday, April 13, 2017. / FINANCIAL POST
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Scott Jendruck, left, Caitlin McElhone, right, and their son, Mason Jendruck, 2, are photographed in the urban neighbourhood of Grandin in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday, April 13, 2017. / FINANCIAL POST
EDMONTON — Michael Janz and Sally Tang hide two-month old Miles as if he was a bag of drugs when they walk between their car and their suburban Edmonton condo.
“We call him Baby Moses because he’s not allowed in Egypt, and we have to carry him under our coat if we’re going through the parkade,” Janz said. “It’s the glances and stares you get from your neighbours,” Tang added. “They look at you and wonder if it’s a 21-and-older building, why is there a baby? It feels like we’re hiding him.”
Janz and Tang live in an adult-only condo, a common age discrimination applied to multi-unit housing in Alberta, and one brewing a bitter feud between millennial families and family-friendly housing advocates on one side, and developers, industry advocates and seniors on the other, who want the province’s age discrimination in housing maintained.
Alberta is the last province in Canada to allow developers, condo boards and landlords to discriminate on who is allowed to live where based on age, except seniors. But following a human rights challenge, a court has given the government until January 2018 to reconsider what exemptions to a coming ban on age discrimination it will uphold.
Young families such as Janz and Tang’s are pushing to outlaw buildings with bylaws that dictate residents must be older than 18 (though their building is 21 and older).
“It’s a distorted market signal we’re sending to families, that before you even start trying to have children you have to go and buy a single detached home in a neighbourhood — and where can you afford to buy?” Janz said.
But Anand Sharma, president of the northern Alberta chapter of the Canadian Condominium Institute (CCI), said the group is set to lobby the Alberta government to uphold age discrimination exemptions in housing.
He said the CCI wants to protect seniors-only exemptions, but acknowledges the unintended consequence might be upholding the adult-only ones as well.
“It’s kind of all or nothing: either you’re in favour of allowing condos to restrict age or you’re not,” Sharma said. “Are we prepared to tell people that your building is no longer allowed to be a 55-plus building? I don’t think Alberta is ready for that.”
David Shepherd, an Edmonton MLA with the ruling NDP, said he was unaware about the effect of age discrimination rules until constituents, including a single mother who’d left an abusive house only to find it difficult to find a place to live, came to him with tragic stories.
Shepherd said the challenge facing the NDP government is determining just how many buildings in Alberta have discriminatory bylaws in place, since collecting that information would require, in many cases, paying to look at thousands of individual building bylaws.
“There doesn’t appear to be any concrete data on this issue,” he said.
David Cumming, a Calgary-based lawyer who specializes in condominium litigation, said age-discrimination cases aren’t a “burning” issue for his office, and estimates the number of age-restricted buildings in Alberta to be about 10 per cent of the total stock.
The fascinating aspect of the dispute for Cumming, though, is that the legalities of the age-discrimination bylaws are vague at the moment, with courts in the past both upholding and challenging them.
“It’s just an interesting legal issue,” he said. “And if the rules do change, there’s a lot of 40-(year-old)-plus buildings that would have bylaws that are obsolete.”
Alberta’s laws mean a condominium board can technically change its bylaws to discriminate based on age if 75 per cent of members approve.
But Raj Dhunna, chief operating officer of Edmonton’s Regency Developments — which has built several new multi-unit residential buildings in the past few years — said the restrictions are most often put in place by the developer.
Dhunna said Regency, which recently opened a 30-storey condominium, Edmonton’s tallest to date, has not put age-restricted bylaws on its developments, but is considering the idea.
His consideration highlights the non-intuitive economic factors at play. Where some might see an age restriction as limiting the market for a building, Dhunna said the opposite can also be the case.
“I haven’t had any age-restrictions building in the past, but I’m considering it on a project in the future,” he said. “One of the reasons that comes across a developer’s decision-making process is seniors. They want to stay in the same neighbourhood and they’re looking to downsize, and that’s where an Codie McLachlan/National Post Codie McLachlan/National Post
The price to build townhouse units puts them uncomfortably close to what a buyer can pay for a single-detached home in a greenfield suburb, Dhunna said.
“My list price on those units opens me up to a lot more competition,” he said.
But with about 100,000 people per year joining Alberta’s population since 2012, at least partially because it has the highest take-home pay in the country, the issue is not going to soon disappear even though there are signs of life in the province’s housing market.
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. on Monday reported that new residential unit construction in Alberta’s urban centres is showing signs of life. But in Calgary, more than 2,000 new housing units were unoccupied, the biggest inventory on record.
Many newcomers either choose or are forced to rent because of a lack of available or affordable housing, but some also have or may want to have children at some point as well.
My list price on those units opens me up to a lot more competition
For Janz and Tang, they made an offer on a house after the condo board said it wouldn’t let them stay because of their baby. That offer fell through and they are now scrambling to build an infill house in an older Edmonton neighborhood.
They sought — and got — eight months from their condo board to move out, but it’s a race that Janz said has placed undue stress on the young family.
It’s also why they keep Miles out of sight as much as possible.
“It’s a weird feeling because we’re ever so thankful to the condo board for granting us this exemption to stay for eight months,” he said. “We don’t want to rock the boat at all; we don’t even put the garbage down the shoot after 10 o’clock.”
But, he said, the principle is still incorrect. “We also feel this is an egregious wrong that needs to be corrected.”


Julie Ali ·
While I respect that folks want to have peace and quiet I don't really believe that this is a human right. It's more of a human right in my mind to be allowed to live any place folks want to live without age discrimination present. As such I don't support age discrimination in terms of tenancy. I see no reason for any developer putting in caveats to prohibit tenancy to families with young kids. For the Canadian Condominium Institute to lobby the GOA to maintain age restrictions seems a rather regressive move on their part.

http://www.calgaryherald.com/kids.../13306415/story.html
But Anand Sharma, president of the northern Alberta chapter of the Canadian Condominium Institute (CCI), said the group is set to lobby the Alberta government to uphold age discrimination exemptions in housing.

He said the CCI wants to protect seniors-only exemptions, but acknowledges the unintended consequence might be upholding the adult-only ones as well.
***********
Even if there are only a few buildings that have the adults only requirement my question is why should we protect the privilege of this group of citizens? I see no need for the seniors only or the adults only exemption; it's discriminatory and it is elitist. For eg, if you a student and there is a shortage of housing opportunities--well then an empty apartment at a seniors only building should be available to that student. It's not as if the seniors are going to be impacted by having young folks around and multi-generation living might actually improve the quality of lives of seniors and adults.

Ruth Adria of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society worked hard to get age discrimination eliminated in Alberta---mainly with reference to seniors issues ----but it seems that elimination of age discriminiation is also necessary for families.

http://www.cbc.ca/.../age-human-rights-alberta-1.3925515

Ageism to become discrimination in Alberta for first time
'We can now join the rest of Canada'
CBC News Posted: Jan 06, 2017 5:18 PM MT Last Updated: Jan 08, 2017 8:41 AM MT
Age will soon be included as a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Alberta Human Rights Act.

An application to include age as a discriminating factor was granted at a hearing in Edmonton Court of Queen's Bench Friday after it was unopposed by the province.

"We can now join the rest of Canada," said lawyer Allan Garber as he left the court with seniors' advocate Ruth Adria.

While the preamble to the act proclaims all people are "equal in dignity, rights and responsibilities with regard to" many qualities including age, age is not included as a prohibited ground of discrimination in respect to goods and services or tenancies, Adria's application said.
LikeReplyJust now
Geoffrey A Pounder
These people know the rules coming in. It's not as they're taken by surprise.
They decide to have a family, and then they demand the rules be changed – without consideration for their neighbours.

If age-restricted buildings in Alberta are 10% of the total stock, this isn't even an issue.
If specific regions lack family housing (e.g., downtown Edmonton), then provide incentives to landlords in new buildings.
But don't enact new provincial laws to address a problem that does not even exist elsewhere in AB.
LikeReply214 hrsEdited
Peter Hicks ·
This happens all the time. They went in there knowingthe restrictions and now they are cry baby. Just like those who chose to live in the path of the flights taking off and landing and now they want to plane to change course to go into other areas to take the noise away. It is alos like a peoson who marries a physician and then complains that he/she is away to the hospital so often or called away in the middle of a dinner. Grow up you guys.
LikeReply154 hrs
Theresa Voigt ·
Agree with the comments made by G. Pounder and P. Hicks. Why the hell did these two have a child when they live in a "no children allowed" building. Wha-wha-wha-wha! FInd a house or an apartment/condo building that does allow for children. Grow up and take responsibility for your actions and accept the consequences.
LikeReply124 hrs
Deb Takacs Turcott
It's always ok until it happens to you mentality. I get tired of this. I love kids. I work at a school. I have 2 grandsons 4 and a half and 1 and a half. Love them dearly and love hanging out. But do I want to listen to babies crying or kids screaming at all hours 24/7? Not likely. There must be choices and once you sign on to that choice either accept it or leave. I'm tired of one or two crybabies fighting for changes when the rest of us are fine with our choices.
LikeReply124 hrs
Bob Hunter
Wow. They knew the rules going in, and if they didn't it is their problem. If they want to change the building bylaws, there is a process for that but you require a majority of the owners to agree. Good luck with that! Buildings that don't allow children do that for a reason. I have one word for this couple - MOVE. I do not need a nanny government to make all the rules for everyone.
LikeReply63 hrs
Amy Holloway
Personally, I would like to see more age 18+ apartments or age 10+ restaurants. I promise the revenue would INCREASE. No one respects another person's peace anymore. Some parents don't raise their kids, but rather, let society do it, and society pays the price. Sorry, not sorry.
LikeReply12 hrs

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