Tuesday, March 28, 2017

--#WeAreTheChange-----------10) What all of this stuff seems to mean is that the continuing care industry in Alberta needs to do more work in improving care provision--as well as complaint resolution-- as do all the other partners in care--the government of Alberta, AHS, Covenant Health and independent businesses like Medigas and such like. We need to have the focus on patient and resident health and safety not on the profit bottom line or the image of everyone. We need a central repository for all adverse events and recommendations that get tracked and implemented. This is sort of recommendation implementation across the system is unlikely to happen because government and its partners are more interested in image than performance as indicated in the child welfare system deaths that are ongoing. Liability issues plague critical incident cases of abuse, harm and deaths and so there won't be any change by the partners in care. We aren't partners in care---- according to government, health authorities and the continuing care industry ---because we are the customers who are being serviced. We are units to be moved around in the continuing care system without rights and respect. As such, we don't count. In terms of change individual families are limited to one time media deals for rousing the public from its stupor. What is interesting is when families join up to rouse the public. This sort of joining up --uniting for change under umbrella organizations like The Elder Advocates of Alberta Society is essential for real change to result. Once a critical number of families have said their stories we will have change in continuing care as in the health care system. It is already happening. It's only sad that it will be up to families to ensure that change happens.



Julie Ali feeling thankful.
26 mins
Rebecca called yesterday and she seems more rousable. We asked for day time BIPAP use scheduled in.
I told her to get on the BIPAP this afternoon.
If she is more awake tomorrow I will pick her up for a home visit.
Meanwhile I am in the middle of preparing for questioning. I will be grilled next week by the Good Samaritan Society lawyers. I will then go to court.
I don't know too much about the court process but I am learning. This is the first time this stay at home mum has done more than go to the library for library books to read at home.Life was just not every lively until the Good Samaritan Society sued me for my blog and e-mails about Rebecca.
I learned the following steps are part of the risk management processes of continuing care companies in Alberta:
1) The complaint resolution process is murky.
2) I found no adverse event protocol.
3) The government of Alberta sends you to AHS.
4) AHS can't do anything because these are private businesses and the government of Alberta has given AHS no powers to interfere.
5) So what does Alberta Health and AHS do in these situations? Usually they stall for as long as they can. Then, with a critical number of complaints from many families at a facility-- they do an audit. Alberta Health did a Quality Audit of the Good Samaritan Extended Care in Millwoods in 2014.
6) Prompted (I guess) by the Alberta Health folks, AHS folks got of their tidy behinds and did a Quality review in 2014.
7) From the Protection for Persons in Care investigation of 2015 there was chatter of these audits and this was the only way I found out about these audits.
8) When the FOIP request for audits was made to Alberta Health we got the CCHSS audit done in January 2015. No sort of paperwork came with this audit to inform us of the other audits that were withheld for mysterious reasons by both Alberta Health and AHS.
Since I did not know about the other audits until I got the PPIC investigation information (which was heavily redacted so most of it was not available) --I found out that the government of Alberta had withheld information. Wow. It's so neat. I mean I can't go to the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta to contest information that is withheld by the government when I don't know it is being withheld can I?
This sort of stuff kind of is out of the realm of stay at home motherhood.
In any case, I have not got the information. Alberta Health is mum. AHS is mum. The entire world is mum.
8) The Good Samaritan Society told us they would give us the independent consultant review of respiratory services that they commissioned in 2014 but they only gave the report to AHS--possibly along with a request for more money. I never got the review because it was deemed not fit for me to have.
All I got told about this report is that the Good Samaritan Society was losing money on the delivery of the respiratory program.
9) The PPIC abuse cases confirm two incidents of abuse. I have the reports and they also indicate that a mitigating factor for the abuse is that Rebecca is her own decision maker. What the heck? Rebecca was her own decision maker at the Villa Marguerite but she is managing there with a compliance program that is set up by the business and AHS (AHS makes the care plans at this place and the business delivers the care).
So being your own decision maker does not get the care giver organization off the hook in terms of ensuring health and safety in my opinion. Risk management agreements should not abrogate the requirement for proper compliance program provision especially for the handicapped citizen.
10) What all of this stuff seems to mean is that the continuing care industry in Alberta needs to do more work in improving care provision--as well as complaint resolution-- as do all the other partners in care--the government of Alberta, AHS, Covenant Health and independent businesses like Medigas and such like. We need to have the focus on patient and resident health and safety not on the profit bottom line or the image of everyone. We need a central repository for all adverse events and recommendations that get tracked and implemented.
This is sort of recommendation implementation across the system is unlikely to happen because government and its partners are more interested in image than performance as indicated in the child welfare system deaths that are ongoing.
Liability issues plague critical incident cases of abuse, harm and deaths and so there won't be any change by the partners in care. We aren't partners in care---- according to government, health authorities and the continuing care industry ---because we are the customers who are being serviced. We are units to be moved around in the continuing care system without rights and respect. As such, we don't count. In terms of change individual families are limited to one time media deals for rousing the public from its stupor. What is interesting is when families join up to rouse the public. This sort of joining up --uniting for change under umbrella organizations like The Elder Advocates of Alberta Society is essential for real change to result. Once a critical number of families have said their stories we will have change in continuing care as in the health care system. It is already happening. It's only sad that it will be up to families to ensure that change happens.
In Alberta the morass of legislation that has been set up by the former PCs and ignored by the NDPCs means that the change will not come through the legislation that is present or that maybe created but through the public itself. Change actually never comes through government because government is all about private interests. This is why it is kind of an oxymoron to think of government being about the public interest. If this is the case that government does not serve us but serves private interests-those of the elite bureaucrats and executive staff milking the system dry--those of politicians in power-and those of folks like those in big oil--then we might as well privatise government for the most part and do as much of the work in the private sector for better results. I see no point keeping around a public entity in its massive form (with no deliverables) when we could have a small entity with a private work force with deliverables.
Going through a lawsuit is a prolonged process much like getting my Msc degree. It's tedious, requires work in spurts and then there is defending your work. It requires the willingness to keep going and never quit. Next week I will be going through questioning and I will write about this process so you will all find out how to defend yourself when you are sued by the continuing care industry in Alberta.
In my opinion, every experience is good experience. It helps you become a stronger person. You can then help others. As a member of the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society I can now be useful to Ruth Adria who has for decades gone through the sort of stuff I am going through right now. I can help other families who are being sued by the care provider. The government of Alberta won't help families. That is not the job of government. Apparently the job of government is to make laws. These laws do not protect families or the residents. What these laws do is to provide a framework for cover up of poor compliance, failures in care, neglect, abuse and death in some cases. Not all continuing care facilities are in a mess; some appear to work albeit with too few staff who have specialized training.
There is not much I can do to change the poor performance of the government of Alberta and the health authorities whose main purpose seems to be to ensure that the elite at these places retain their perks. All I can do is write about my family and the experiences we go through. I can write about a modern day saint --in Ruth Adria who does not quit. I am not Ruth Adria. But I am following her.
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Ruth Adria of Elder Advocates of AB says she's been banned for helping families with quality of care & abuse concerns

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#WeAreTheChange--#FollowingRuthAdria---It's funny that we go to government and public bodies for change.
These are not the places for change.
Families are the places for change.
When we unite under umbrella organizations like the Elder Advocates of Alberta Society and the John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights, the world changes.
We join together.
We tell our stories.
We change the world.
Government follows us.
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