Wednesday, March 1, 2017

----On Jan. 22, 2004 Kyle, who suffered from mental health issues, was being held in a courthouse holding cell. While moving the teen to calm him down, court constables took Kyle to an elevator and restrained him against the door. But the door came off its track and Kyle fell down the shaft five floors. The 16-year-old was in shackles and handcuffs at the time.-------Lorena Young and her lawyer contend it was lack of proper medication that was responsible for her son acting up the day he died.--------And while Kyle’s death was 10 years ago, Lorena says at times it feels as though she just saw her son 15 minutes ago. “The last time I saw him,” she said, holding back tears, “he walked out the door and said ‘bye, mom. See ya later.’ [With a] big smile. That was Kyle.”-------

http://globalnews.ca/news/1101071/memorial-vigil-held-10-years-after-teen-died-at-edmonton-law-courts/


January 22, 2014 4:52 pm
Updated: January 22, 2014 11:13 pm

Memorial vigil held 10 years after teen died at Edmonton Law Courts

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EDMONTON – Ten years ago to the day, a 16-year-old boy died after falling down an elevator shaft while in custody at the Edmonton Law Courts. And on Wednesday, family and friends came together outside the courthouse to remember Kyle Young.
“He was my son,” said Lorena Young, Kyle’s mother. “I had to be here.”

On Jan. 22, 2004 Kyle, who suffered from mental health issues, was being held in a courthouse holding cell. While moving the teen to calm him down, court constables took Kyle to an elevator and restrained him against the door. But the door came off its track and Kyle fell down the shaft five floors. The 16-year-old was in shackles and handcuffs at the time.
For Lorena, Wednesday’s vigil was the first time she’s been back to the law courts since her son’s death.
“You lose your child, you never get over it,” she said. “I don’t know what else to say, it’s devastating.”
“I will always have my memory,” added Kyle’s sister Amanda. “These are things no one can ever take.”
Following the boy’s death, a fatality inquiry determined the elevator was improperly maintained. It also found the constables acted appropriately.
Those at the memorial Wednesday say it was also an opportunity to advocate for the rights of prisoners with mental health issues.
“In my view, this whole incident would not have happened, he would not have died, if he was on proper medication and treatment,” said defence lawyer Tom Engel.
“It’s a sober reminder, I think, of the plight of prisoners in our province. Prisoners are still being mistreated as we speak here. They’re still not getting proper care for their mental health concerns.”
Alberta Justice has implemented changes, including adding cameras in the courthouse elevators used for moving inmates. Alberta Sheriffs also have to go through use of force and mental health training.
Kyle’s eldest sister, Charmagne, believes the system has likely improved over the past decade, but says “we’re not all the way there.”
“We need to bring attention to the fact that people with mental illnesses aren’t being handled well within the system,” she said. “It’s hard to have faith in a system that allows for this type of thing to happen. And when no one is held accountable for anything, how can you believe in the justice system?”
The Young family was pleased by how many people came out to show their support for Kyle Wednesday afternoon.
And while Kyle’s death was 10 years ago, Lorena says at times it feels as though she just saw her son 15 minutes ago.
“The last time I saw him,” she said, holding back tears, “he walked out the door and said ‘bye, mom. See ya later.’ [With a] big smile. That was Kyle.”


Velvet Martin
 shared a link.
Edmonton prisoner needed pills prior to guard scuffle and fatal elevator fall
While this tragic story goes back a number of years, it tends to bring to mind issues that present repeatedly within the culture of Child Protective Services as well:
A 'kid' (teen) who, at just 16 years of age, died while in the hands of Authorities. The victim was a child with developmental delays who required potent medications - Prozac and Respiradol - yet, had no access to these drugs for 2 weeks prior to his death. Youth with such diagnoses are far too often, those who are the most vulnerable to events of self-destruction or abuse by others. Individuals do not present with disability outwardly, but with invisible developmental disorders, may be potently damaging unless recipients of guidance and support. It seems to me that this kid not only fell to his death, but sadly was slipping unmercifully through "the cracks" well before the ordeal.
Later articles establish that a defective elevator door was the source of the boy's death. Witnessed account leading up to the event demonstrate a coarser and perhaps, darker side to the situation: A kid whose stature, at 125 pounds, hands and feet bound while accompanied by guards each weighing 75 pound more than him, should have failed to prove much of a challenge? Aside from the entire tragedy itself, what troubles me - as stated in the article - "Public fatality inquiries establish the cause, manner, time and other circumstances of a death. They do not determine legal responsibility but may offer recommendations to prevent future deaths." The inability for the Courts to impose culpability which could afford better judicial accountabilty is an absent venue in present Legislation.
Furthermore, in a related article:
Lorena Young, mom of the young victim, attempted litigation as survivor on behalf of her son, yet a number of limations are automatically faced by families:
 - A statement of claim must be filed within a 2-year-period from death.
- "Under Section 8 of the Fatal Accidents Act, the maximum a parent of the deceased minor can receive in damages is $75,000."
- "The lawsuit is also asking for $5,000 to cover funeral costs. Because Kyle, who was 16 when he died, was a minor with no dependents, his mother will not be able to sue for future losses."
- "The inquiry concluded in September, but the report has not been completed." (This was as of mid-February of the following year!)
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Edmonton prisoner needed pills prior to guard scuffle and fatal elevator fall
JOHN COTTER, June 14, 2005
EDMONTON (CP) - A teen prisoner who fell to his death down a courthouse elevator shaft after tussling with guards had not taken his medication for severe behavioural problems for two weeks, a nurse told an inquiry Tuesday.
Sherri Roles was a psychiatric nurse at the Edmonton Young Offender Centre when Kyle Young, 16, was admitted on Jan. 19, 2004, after being arrested by police. Roles testified she met with the boy to determine if he was a suicide risk or posed a threat to other inmates.
"Kyle was very co-operative and calm and participated in the interview," she said. Roles noted the youth said he was doing well and seemed to accept his situation.
The nurse said she asked if he was on medication. Young replied he had been prescribed Prozac and Respiradol for anger and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The boy then told her he didn't have any medication with him and hadn't taken any of his pills for two weeks.
"He definitely needed a new prescription," Roles said. She booked him for an appointment with a staff psychiatrist to obtain the medication.
The appointment was made for the morning of Jan. 22, but he never made it. That was the day Young, who was shackled and wearing handcuffs, was removed from a cell at the courthouse by two guards because he was acting up.
The guards, both over six feet tall and each weighing more than 200 pounds, have testified the boy fell five storeys down the shaft after they pressed him against an elevator door and it popped off its tracks.
On Monday, Young's mother testified her son was like any other normal teenager when he took his pills. She said he had been on medication for behavioural problems since he was six year old.
But when he didn't take his medication, he could "flip out" and would swear, throw things and show disrespect to authority figures, Lorena Young said.
She said Roles' testimony reinforces what she has always known.
"I'm just glad that we found out that Kyle was not on his medication as a fact, not just as the family knowing," she said outside court.
"Now everybody knows because the lady said so."
On Monday Young also testified that staff at the young offenders centre told her that her son wasn't allowed to receive medication from his family.
Roles said that wasn't true.
The nurse also testified she classified the youth as stable with no need for mental health checks.
Earlier Tuesday, Don Livingstone, a supervisor at the centre, testified Young was held in a special security cell the day before he died following a dispute with a staff member.
Staff ordered Young to strip and wear a garment, known as "baby dolls," that was used for young offenders thought to be a suicide risk, Livingstone said. Inmate slang for the garment was "wearing a dress."
Livingstone testified the Alberta government has since discontinued the use of such garments.
Lorena Young and her lawyer contend it was lack of proper medication that was responsible for her son acting up the day he died.
Toxicology tests performed after the boy's death were inconclusive.
His mother has said she hopes the inquiry, headed by provincial court Judge Jerry LeGrandeur, will determine if excessive force was used by the guards and if the elevator door was defective.
A review by Alberta's Justice Department last year said guards used "a modest amount of restraint" and followed "normal procedures" with Young.
Public fatality inquiries establish the cause, manner, time and other circumstances of a death. They do not determine legal responsibility but may offer recommendations to prevent future deaths.

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Sad
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Julie Ali The system is so broken. This poor kid.

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