Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Alberta Health Services is defending its decision to close a 20-bed unit at Alberta Hospital Edmonton in spite of a scathing letter from psychiatrists who describe the move as "disastrous." A group of psychiatrists from the hospital, which provides mental health services, wrote an open letter to Health Minister Sarah Hoffman on March 17, pleading with her to reconsider the decision. But the decision will stand, said Mark Snaterse, executive director for addiction and mental health for AHS. The closures at Alberta Hospital will help fund the opening of many more specialized beds, he said. "The number of beds that we're opening and the services we're expanding are going to far outweigh what we needed to close to make that happen," Snaterse said. The closure of the Alternate Level of Care unit, a program for mentally ill patients who may also be homeless and fighting addictions, is scheduled to happen on April 10. The savings from the program's closure will allow AHS to open 37 new specialized mental health beds of various kinds in Edmonton, with more being promised.---------

I don't see how magically converting a specialised Alternate Level of Care bed at Alberta Hospital to the community transition bed in the community is a good thing.
Based on our experiences as a family it is harder to access services in the community while at the hospital everyone is just there.
In addition asking for help in the community is like asking for resuscitation when doctors are determined to do premature termination-it is difficult if not impossible for mentally ill folks to get the services and supports they need without advocates.
So who will do the sort of oversight and review that psychiatrists at Alberta Hospital were doing? No one.
It's a case of downgrading patients in my opinion and then they try to tell us this is a good thing because these folks are better off in the community.
Right. If this was the case we would not have folks being denied treatment while they are in the community.
The endless bed nomenclature of AHS as it tries to find solutions that are fairly simple are puzzling to this mum. Maybe I could help them out?
1) Have integrated care plans for medical and psychiatric cases that take into account cognitive difficulties such as memory problems and attention deficits. When assessing such residents put them in placements where staff have mental health training rather than expecting the cognitively challenged or the inappropriately medicated patient to manage to get the care they don't even know they need.
2) Have a psychiatrist associated with each resident.
3) Have a medical doctor present for each resident.
4) Do the assessments regularly and if specialists like a pulmonary specialist needs to be doing oversight put that in place because sure as apple trees make apples, the handicapped citizen can't do this stuff without help.
5) Take care of the staff training so that the staff can recognise problems such as deterioration of mental health status before it becomes a major crisis. If you don't train the professionals how do you expect the patient to get the help required?
6) Don't tell the residents to repeatedly do something when they aren't able to do it. Instead do the checks to ensure the patient is safe. Even if this requires hourly checks.
7) Don't just take vital signs and sit on them. What do they mean? Maybe get a doctor involved. Don't wait for family to do the diagnosis no one else is doing.
8) The patient can't tell you the problem. Don't blame the patient.
9) Don't do the do not resuscitate business on patients without insight and don't pretend they have insight and are choosing no intubation.
10) Don't pretend to be thinking of the patient's best interests when you are denying services. Be honest. Say that you are denying services because the patient is not worth saving in your mind. Then tell the family this so we can get a lawyer involved as this family had to do because their family member was denied help. http://edmontonjournal.com/…/family-of-suicide-victim-sues-…
These are some helpful hints.

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Another dumb move by AHS. We get to lose specialized Alternate Level of Care beds at Alberta Hospital for something less in the community; also the number of beds go down from 20 to 15 beds. So how does this help the mentally ill who need specialized supports and services other than moving them from a hospital to the community?
As far as I can tell, the community based mental health services are crappy so why would this be a good thing?


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-health-services-bed-closure-1.4036736

Alberta Health Services defends 20 bed closures at Alberta Hospital

Psychiatrists have described closures as 'disastrous' but AHS says more beds will open elsewhere

By Gareth Hampshire, CBC News Posted: Mar 22, 2017 3:16 PM MT Last Updated: Mar 22, 2017 3:16 PM MT
A 20-bed Alberta Hospital Edmonton unit for patients who may be mentally ill, homeless and battling addictions is scheduled to close on April 10.
A 20-bed Alberta Hospital Edmonton unit for patients who may be mentally ill, homeless and battling addictions is scheduled to close on April 10. (CBC News)
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Alberta Health Services is defending its decision to close a 20-bed unit at Alberta Hospital Edmonton in spite of a scathing letter from psychiatrists who describe the move as "disastrous."
A group of psychiatrists from the hospital, which provides mental health services, wrote an open letter to Health Minister Sarah Hoffman on March 17, pleading with her to reconsider the decision.
But the decision will stand, said Mark Snaterse, executive director for addiction and mental health for AHS.
The closures at Alberta Hospital will help fund the opening of many more specialized beds, he said.
"The number of beds that we're opening and the services we're expanding are going to far outweigh what we needed to close to make that happen," Snaterse said.
The closure of the Alternate Level of Care unit, a program for mentally ill patients who may also be homeless and fighting addictions, is scheduled to happen on April 10.
The savings from the program's closure will allow AHS to open 37 new specialized mental health beds of various kinds in Edmonton, with more being promised.
Mark Snaterse
Mark Snaterse of AHS said the unit being closed will help fund beds in the community to help patients transition back into society. (CBC News)
Snaterse said it's hard for the staff at Alberta Hospital not to see the move as a loss. But he said there will be no job losses and patients will be better served in the long run.
"When someone doesn't need to be in hospital anymore then we shouldn't keep them in hospital, and if somebody is [in] what we call alternate level of care then what we're saying is that person is well enough to be in the community," he said.
He noted 15 new beds for such patients will be available in the community next month. The beds, called community transition beds, will open in three Edmonton transitional homes. Health professionals will provide in-home supports.

20 staff at Alberta Hospital to be reassigned

Twenty-two other new beds have either already opened or are coming onstream at the Royal Alexandra Hospital, with six more being added there in the coming months.
Mark Smith, seniors housing and mental health critic with the Wildrose Opposition, raised the issue in the Legislature Tuesday.
He said the decision is a major concern, especially given front-line workers who are against it weren't consulted.
Hoffman replied by saying the government is investing in front-line services to make sure more supports are available for people.
Snaterse said the 20-bed unit being closed opened late in 2012 but hasn't always been fully utilized, leading AHS bosses to make the switch to supportive transitional housing programs.
He said about 20 staff from the unit — including nurses, psychiatric aides and social workers — will be reassigned to other programs.



All these movements of beds are very confusing. It is also confusing to read this statement by AHS folks:


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-health-services-bed-closure-1.4036736
"When someone doesn't need to be in hospital anymore then we shouldn't keep them in hospital, and if somebody is [in] what we call alternate level of care then what we're saying is that person is well enough to be in the community," he said.



What does this mean? Has the GOA finally decided to reverse its own policy of holding patients in acute care and subacute beds plus in these specialised alternate level of care beds? Have they discovered that inappropriate assessments of citizens leading to placements in continuing care that aren't working that ultimately leads to the eviction to acute care--is their own darn fault?
Or are they now into making new community beds that are less effective than the specialized alternate level of care beds at the Alberta Hospital place? Are they simply adding more jargon to the increasing nomenclature we now have about beds in Alberta? Are they bent on transformation or downgrading every level of service provided to citizens in care?


In my opinion, I tend to trust doctors more than bureaucrats when they are speaking of mental illness cases. If the doctors believe it is better to have these folks in the specialised hospital beds  well--would they not know?  They have the best backgrounds to assess risk and problems for patients.

But nope, Alberta Health Services is moving these ALC patients out into what?
I can't say since the folks at AHS have not told us anything about the replacement beds other than that they are in the community.
Fat lot of good that will do the patients---being in the community.
It will be simply harder to access help.
The beds that are being created in the community sound like a downgraded service provision situation to me.
In a hospital setting you have an integrated care team of psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, laboratory, Physiotherapist, Occupational therapist, social worker etc at hand and able to do the immediate service delivery.
What will be present at the 15 community beds?

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-health-services-bed-closure-1.4036736

He noted 15 new beds for such patients will be available in the community next month. The beds, called community transition beds, will open in three Edmonton transitional homes. Health professionals will provide in-home supports.


See the key words here?  HEALTH PROFESSIONALS. This is SPIN SPEAK. It usually stands for a lower level of service provision with cheaper staff on hand.
Maybe there will be LPNs doing the SL4 type stuff with a psychiatrist coming in once a week or so. Maybe there will be good old people off the street trained as PCAs-personal care attendants. Maybe a NP -nurse practitioner will be around rather than a doctor. When they just have health professionals as the staff-this is code in my book of health care experience for cheap, less and poor service provision.


But who knows. This sort of Houdini move by the GOA (who is the real decision maker behind all AHS work)  reminds me of the downgrade of my sister from long term care to supportive living 4. The "in-home supports" are day time RNs at the SL4 site provided by AHS who are not present on weekends or in the evening. Apparently the LPNs can call them on off hours -- but they are not to be bugged unless someone is dying.

The downgrading of care is achieved by care assessments that AHS is in charge of so can manipulate as they see fit.  There is no plain language documents to explain placement. So I imagine a patient in acute care bed who had a mental health issue who normally would end up in the ALC bed at the Alberta Hospital would now be assessed to go to the community transition bed. And then what? I'm pretty sure it won't be pretty.   So I would imagine the 15 beds that are community transition beds will be less supportive than the ALC beds at Alberta Hospital. Will this sort of downgrade of service provision for the great joy of being in the community be enough? I doubt it. But there you go.

We have the concerns of the real professionals (the psychiatrists) written over by the bureaucrats who  know nothing about mental illness. Other beds are also being opened up elsewhere. But in the end how will all these new names for beds solve the problems of a mental health system in crisis? I have no confidence that changing names of beds, transferring folks from specialized health care teams in a hospital to who knows what in the community is a better deal.

The total number of added units aren't much to deal with the major numbers of mental health cases.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-health-services-bed-closure-1.4036736
Twenty-two other new beds have either already opened or are coming onstream at the Royal Alexandra Hospital, with six more being added there in the coming months.

It is clear to me at least, that this government -despite the infusion of mental health dollars by the federal government --- is not working fast enough or intelligently to solve the problems in the mental health system.

When will government solve these problems? I guess when they go to the professionals for help and advice rather than make dumb decisions based on no real medical data that I can find on how this sort of move will help patients.

I also don't see how the addition of so few beds will help with the major numbers of folks in acute care all over Alberta with psychiatric illness.

The only thing that changes in Alberta is the addition of more bed nomenclature. Now add the term "Community Transition Beds" to the other terms of:

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/assets/about/publications/ahs-pub-2015-2016-annual-report.pdf
Alberta Health Services 2015-16 Annual Report
Page 137
Alternate Level of Care beds
Restorative Care Beds
Acute Care Beds
Sub-acute care beds
Palliative Care beds in Acute Care
Neonatal intensive Care beds
Intensive Care Beds
Long term care beds
Supportive Living 4 Dementia beds
Supportive Living 4
Supportive Living 3
Palliative Care beds in community (PELOC)
Psychiatric beds (stand alone facilities)
Addiction treatment beds
Community Mental Health Beds

While I agree with Alberta Health Services that folks who are stuck in Alternate Level of Care beds should be in appropriate other settings just where are these placements in the community?
My sister spent a year at the Grey Nuns Hospital after eviction from the long term care facility waiting to get into the community but there were no takers. There was chatter of yet another Alternate Level of Care placement if she did not go to the lower level of care placement.
In the end the Grey Nuns Hospital evicted her as well with the use of the Hospital Act. to the SL4 site. I am curious now whether patients from acute care placements were forced to go this ALC site at Alberta Hospital that is now being closed.
If so, isn't this the best place for them rather than the less than able other sites that do not have mental health supports and services much less the ability to take care of such complex care patients? Or is AHS going to assemble integrated care teams for ALC patients with mental health issues that are being transferred out of acute care beds due to budget cuts? I wonder what sort of teams are going to be assembled by AHS since based on our experiences in long term care, the response in the community is to send the resident to acute care thereby making the community placement a waste of time.
So if these ALC patients go into the community and folks at the new transition place can't help them then they will end up back in acute care so what is the point of closing a place that works for one that may not serve these patients well just for the bonus of being in the community?
I note in the recent AHS yearly report that as of March 31, 2016 there were a total of 654 Psychiatric patients in acute care. I am curious how these patients will transition out if there is no backup plan of an ALC beds at Alberta Hospital.
If there is no back up plan other than a community placement without any information provided about the services and supports at these new sites then I am pretty sure this closure will be a flop.
I am also curious what the plan is for the people who are now out of the specialised Alberta Hospital ALC bed and in the community since community services are almost impossible to obtain.
But then again is there ever a plan with AHS? There seems to be mostly chatter and meetings for no purpose at AHS and this is hard to imagine that we are paying for staff to endlessly yap but this is the case.
Also, I don't believe that the community setting will provide these folks with help. It's hard to get any sort of help out of a hospital.
Just looking at the medical file for my sister I note that the mental health professional who was asked to provide services for my sister indicated that these services were very rare and could not be requested by the sister. Heck then who would be requesting the services in long term care then? God? I kept asking and they eventually provided a doctor but the woman doing the referral was grumpy about the deal -it was as if I was asking for gold rather than copper. It is clear to me at least---that it is hard to get such specialised help in long term care once your personal doctor dumps you and if this is the case, how much harder will it be to get this help in the community? This move by AHS does not sound good but as usual the citizens are victims of the quick move and it's done and can't do much to appeal to the less than responsive Health Minister who considers us rodents.
And as usual no one listens to the doctors who must be fed up of the short term thinking at AB Health and we just need to see how the community based services work out. How also does replacing 20 beds with just 15 beds in the form of community transition beds solve the problem of 654 psychiatric cases in the backlog at hospitals?
I am curious if anyone at Alberta Health Services knows what the heck they are doing but maybe they have no background in medicine or mental health and it trial and error (mostly error) all the way out of the ALC bed to the community bed.


Alberta Health Services insists its decision to close 20 beds at Alberta Hospital will be better for patients in the long run as it will fund more specialized mental health…
CBC.CA

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http://edmontonjournal.com/news/local-news/family-of-suicide-victim-sues-alberta-hospital-for-alleged-non-admittance




Family of suicide victim sues Alberta Hospital for $750,000 for alleged non-admittance

Published on: February 26, 2016 | Last Updated: February 26, 2016 3:52 PM MDT
A nursing station inside Building 8 at Alberta Hospital in Edmonton. File photo.
A nursing station inside Building 8 at Alberta Hospital in Edmonton. File photo. JOHN LUCAS / EDMONTON JOURNAL
A mentally ill Edmonton woman’s family is claiming she jumped to her death from the seventh floor of the Chateau Lacombe after being turned away at Alberta Hospital.
And the family says in a recent $753,000 lawsuit against the province that it was the third time she was refused admittance at a psychiatric facility — despite her clear need for treatment — and sent away in a taxi.
In a statement of claim filed in court on Feb. 19, the daughter, parents and brother of Janette Peterson allege she was a diagnosed psychiatric patient who had been hospitalized for suicidal tendencies a number of times.
The family claims she took “definite and extreme steps” to attempt suicide in February 2014 — including renting a hotel room and hiring strangers to harm her — and say that and all of her treatment records were fully available on the net care system for medical professionals to review.
The family alleges that Peterson, who is diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder, had twice tried to commit herself to the Royal Alexandra Hospital’s psychiatric unit for her own personal safety and she was denied admittance, provided with cab fare and told to go home.
According to the statement of claim, Peterson posed a clear and imminent threat to herself on Feb. 22, 2014, and her daughter and a friend took her to Alberta Hospital.
The family alleges Peterson clearly presented as suicidal and likely non-compliant with her medications and the admitting nurse assured them that she would be assessed.
However, instead of assessing or admitting Peterson, the family alleges that the hospital turned her away and called her a cab.
According to the statement of claim, Peterson checked herself in at the downtown Chateau Lacombe and jumped to her death from the seventh floor on Feb. 23, 2014.
The family alleges the death was the result of negligence by the doctors and staff at the two hospitals for failing to admit her, failing to properly monitor her and for failing to notify the family that she had been denied admission.
They claim the defendants, which include Alberta Health Services, Alberta Hospital, Royal Alexandra Hospital, the admitting nurse and several doctors and staff members, have a duty to both Peterson and the general public to admit those who are suffering from mental disorders and are likely to cause harm to themselves or others.
The statement of claim also alleges that the defendants have a duty to ensure that “bed pressure” does not result in patients in demonstrable need being turned away.
Statements of defence have not yet been filed.
Statements of claim and statements of defence contain allegations which have not been proven.




Julie Ali · 
Unfortunately the mentally ill have no voice in our society. Family members get burnt out and when there is no one advocating, the mentally ill patient can fall through the cracks in the mental health system which are very big.

If you are mentally ill you don't have insight and might also refuse treatment. The role of an advocate is therefore essential. When family are not present it is the responsibility of medical staff to advocate and work in the best interests of a patient who has no insight.

When the system fails, the mentally ill patient will have no one and incidents like this happen.

Or you have cases where the system gets fed up and puts a "Do not resuscitate" Order on the patient. This happened to my handicapped sister.

This sort of system wide failures with overburdened family taking care of mentally ill family members, a mental health system that lacks psychiatrists and failures to provide complex care plans for these patients results in tragic consequences that are fully preventable if resources, money and trained staff were allocated. It's curious to me that the death by doctor business in Alberta was provided with extra staff but mental health services don't seem to get a similar increase in funding.

In my opinion, there is no damn reason for any of this junk. The GOA needs to see mental health as health --in other words as a service that must be provided. If you can provide chemotherapy for cancer you can provide mental health beds and treatment for mental health issues of citizens.

The only reason why mental health is not a priority in Alberta is because of stigma, powerlessness of the afflicted and indifference. The mentally ill are discriminated against, can't speak for themselves and families are too burnt out or afraid to speak for them.

Families need to do their best to speak publicly about the stress of caring for mentally ill family members, the problems in accessing psychiatric services, the lack of mental health beds and system wide failures to provide required services.

This family is being very courageous and I applaud them for doing the lawsuit. It's unlikely to change the entrenched system of health bureaucrats at Alberta Health and AHS but at least this family is giving a voice to their harmed family member.
LikeReply1Feb 7, 2017 10:36pm
Darren Thompson · 
Works at RankLogic
Having had a friend with serious depression issues and suicide incidents - it became clear with the hospitals that if you were deemed not a threat to others - then you were released because there was such a huge demand for the bed and resources you were taking up. On a side note - criticizing the family is very low class guys - until you have personally dealt with some who is suicidal - you have no idea how difficult and messed up it is to be the people dealing with them. I always though suicide was an excuse until I had someone that I cared about struggling with it.
Chris Blair
Hey Darren, Let's stick to the facts of the article and not make snide assumptions about other people's experiences with such a delicate subject.
LikeReply1Feb 26, 2016 11:22pm
Darren Thompson · 
Works at RankLogic
Chris Blair what are you talking about Chris - I was talking about the article and the comments on here criticizing the family of the women who died - what are you talking about ?
LikeReply2Feb 26, 2016 11:39pm
Jacquie Dziwenko
Chris Blair, I'm sorry, but where is Darren Thompson's "snide assumptions" in his comment? Criticising the family is in bad form....many families have tried to help and get help for their family member or friend, its not their fault that the psychiatric care centres sometimes let people fall through the cracks. The onus is on the health care professional to provide this help...if hospitals are turning people away when they are obviously unwell...whether with family present or not....that is a huge problem and should not be happening.
UnlikeReply1Feb 27, 2016 10:43am
Julie Ali · 
Jacquie Dziwenko Thank you. Famlies with mentally ill family members beg for help. One doctor at the Grey Nuns hospital indicated that there were no beds in the inn. What the heck? She told our family to call the MLAs.
If you have a critically ill patient with a heart attack they make room for you at the hospital. But if you have a mentally ill patient you are disposable. The doctors at the Grey Nuns Hospital were writing -Do not resuscitate on my sister's files for years. Why? I guess she was not of value. They would never try this junk on a "normal" citizen but for the disabled citizen--it is simply accepted. As is the lack of mental health services.
LikeReplyMar 4, 2017 3:31pmEdited
Helen Loraas Harding · 
Sadly this happens too often- being sent away. It is like roulette and I bet overworked staff. My niece worked in oncology as head nurse. She was depressed and suicidal. Under treatment but still put on a happy face until she committed suicide at home. What could have saved her when her medical staff couldn't get all the dots connected?
Julie Ali · 
If you are lucky you have a psychiatrist with hospital privileges who might be able to get you in.
If you are unlucky you just don't have much luck.
It's a matter of who has some way in and most of the folks don't know how to get help.
I can tell you how to get help.
Write publicly about the problem.
Go to media.
Ask for help everywhere.
And make sure that the politicians are getting the message.
The only way to get help is to become an "emerging issue" for the government of Alberta.
That is the only way folks.
Sad but true.
LikeReplyMar 4, 2017 3:15pm
Carole Carnahan · 
Yup, blame the hospital, why didn't they(family) stick around to make sure she was admitted...I mean they must have left her, as the hospital supposidly got her a cab
Julie Ali · 
If you are burnt out from repeated crises you would understand why this sort of cycling through emergency becomes intolerable.
If you don't understand don't bother to give your ill informed opinion.
LikeReplyMar 4, 2017 3:16pm
Chris Blair
The family couldn't wait around to ensure their suicidal family member was admitted to care and assessed correctly? I never would've left someone in that state of mind in a waiting room. RIP.
LikeReply4Feb 26, 2016 5:33pm
Julie Ali · 
If you have not got a family member with mental illness you will not understand the level of burnout experienced by families
It is an ongoing struggle. This family should not be blamed for leaving a family member at the emergency.

They are to be commended for sticking with the horror of our mental health system and helping their family member as much as they did.
Do you know anything about the hell experienced by the mentally ill and their families?If you don't then don't talk to us about the system and how to access help that is not there.
LikeReplyMar 4, 2017 3:32pmEdited
Chris Blair
Julie Ali Don't assume anything about my experience with mental illness, I have more experience than I ever wanted with the subject.
LikeReplyMar 4, 2017 4:56pmEdited
Julie Ali · 
Chris Blair If so you could be more understanding about this case. It's clear to me that when families reach a point of exhaustion, there will be situations where they have to leave care to others. This is not something they want to do; it is something that happens. We are not all of us able to do the work that is required to help our loved ones. Sometimes we have to give care to others. When others fail us -and it happens--then they need to be held to account. Denial of services for mentally ill patients is not acceptable nor is the placement of a do not resuscitate order on their files for no other reason than the system was fed up.
LikeReplyJust now
Jacquie Dziwenko
I was approached by Alberta Child Services to provide a place for the daughter/granddaughter of my closest friend in a "crisis" situation for a "short period of time" that they couldn't determine. This young lady (14 years old) had to be removed from her home due to severe psychiatric/psychological issues that made her a danger to herself and others as well as animals. I declined to take her because of the threat she posed to my animals as well as myself. She clearly belonged in the hospital. My converstion with ACS was over an hour long with me telling them that the place for someone that was not only suicidal but was also highly dangerous to animals and people was in the hospital and not removed from a "safe" environment and put into mine because they felt that because she liked and trusted me therefore I could help her and that she would stabilize. It could not be guaranteed (by the worker) that this girl would not harm me, my animals or another person that lived in the residence which was a male. The young lady had a history of accusing males with sexual abuse and rape. I mentioned a male lived in the residence and could she guarantee that he would not become involved in a situation with police regarding false accusations from an obviously mentally ill person, nor could she guarantee that she wouldn't attempt or succeed in taking her own life. Social worker said no, she couldn't. ??? What the hell is that? It was the weekend and the social worker from ACS was in a hurry to get out of the office (they closed at 4 and it was already 5:30 when she called). Without a doubt she belonged in a hospital, under very close supervision. I also let her know that it was her responsibility to find the proper care in this crisis situation and not hand off the responsibility of her job to me or anyone else especially when we would be put in a potentially dangerous or legal situation. I was told by ACS that the guardians could take her for an assessment at the U of A Psychiatric Centre the following week and that all should be fine because she trusted me. As difficult as it was to turn my friends' daughter/granddaughter away...I had no choice. She was left with other people that were obviously unaware of the potential danger to them. (This information was not forthcoming from the social worker...I asked the right questions because I knew what was going on with her...and it was terrible).

The family took her to the U of A Psychiatric Centre the next Monday where she was assessed and categorized as a "critical emergency" and was booked in for attention at that level. The appointment for that was 2 weeks down the road. "Critical emergency", danger to herself and others and they're told to bring her back in 2 weeks!! Well they did that...and nothing was done for this girl. She ended up living on the street, finding a boyfriend whose family took her in, getting pregnant, and delivering a 1.5 baby approx. a year later. The baby remained in NICU for 3 months in order to get her up to a weight safe enough to go home which thankfully, the baby made it. Hospital staff were not sure the little one would survive as her organs were'nt fully developed, etc. Thankfully, the baby was apprehended in the hospital at birth and eventually placed in the care of her grandmother.

I'm sorry, I know the story is long...my points are:

1. This young lady's family did EVERYTHING they could to get her into hospital; a safe environment where she would receive the care she needed. They could not. They called CWS themselves in order to get help...CWS passed her off to someone else that were not told of her behaviors and imbalance and the subsequent danger of her being in their home.
2. The U of A hospital did not do the right things, in my opinion, to ensure her safety or the safety of others even though she was assessed as "emergency critical". She never did get any hospitalized care but was referred to a "counsellor" if you can imagine.

This child was 14 years old. She was sick. No help whatsoever was given to her or her family. Both ACS and the hospital were highly negligent in following up and taking appropriate action in this situation. To this day, I believe that the young lady is living out on the street somewhere...still a threat to herself and others. This is not right for her, this is not right for the rest of society. Why is this kind of thing happening in Edmonton...in Alberta...or in Canada...we're a civilized society. It's absolutely heartbreaking. How many others are not being given the help they need?
UnlikeReply6Feb 27, 2016 10:37amEdited
Denial of services is unacceptable especially for mentally ill patients.
The failure to provide required services should not occur and Alberta Health needs to do its job to ensure provision of care for vulnerable citizens.
As well Alberta Health should safeguard these patients with additional restrictions on the issuing of Do Not Resuscitate Orders for this group of patients.
Or is Alberta Health not interested in the fate of mentally ill citizens in Alberta?
A mentally ill Edmonton woman's family is claiming she jumped to her death from the seventh floor of the Chateau Lacombe after being turned away at Alberta Hospital.
EDMONTONJOURNAL.COM
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