Tuesday, February 21, 2017

--When asked if it hurt, Hall said, "Yes, it did. Darn right it did." Hall said she was neglected for hours and would appreciate an apology. "I would like to have an apology from the hospital. I sure would."-----------During the ordeal, he said Hall didn't understand what was happening. "For a senior citizen to come out of the Moncton Hospital, send her home with nothing on but a Johnny shirt when all the other stuff was with her, and leave that needle in her arm? Do you think that's right?" --Josephine Hall, 94, had a needle hanging out of her arm and blood pouring out around it when she arrived home from a stay in the hospital. (Matthew Bingley/CBC) "I said, 'Mom, where's the blood coming from?' And I looked and the blood was right straight from the front door, up the stairs, into the kitchen on the floor and it was pouring out of her arm," Tingley said. "So, I got the Johnny shirt open and the blood was all over it, all over the floor. I looked and the needle was halfway out of her arm that they used to take blood out of in the hospital. They never removed it … the blood was pouring right out around it."---------Julie Ali Just now · This is not as mind boggling as you would expect. I've taken family to hospital and have had doctors tell me that there is no beds available and to call the government of Alberta. Other times they have said -what should we do about resuscitation when the green sleeve has the personal directive indicating full resuscitation. I've looked at data now in my sister's file that shows the doctors discussing her health choice of no intubation as being reasonable when she had sky high CO2 levels. The only constant in this business is the most vulnerable defenceless seniors are at risk and need strong advocates. Good thing this senior has one because without such advocates, it's very difficult to access supports and services in a productive fashion.

Adverse events are part of the medical and mental health systems and our most defenceless seniors and handicapped citizens require strong advocates to be their voices in the mess. Such incidents as this one highlight the responsibility of families to their vulnerable senior members who are not able to access the help they need. Go public folks.

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Because some of us have no contact with the medical system we might find this story of a senior sent home with a leaking needle to be traumatic but I don't find it that odd. After trying to get help for my handicapped sister over decades I find the health care system to be rather impermeable to citizens and their problems.
Over the years in Alberta we have had many fine changes in the health care system but these changes have not translated into safer or better services for our most disadvantaged and defenceless seniors and handicapped citizens. I feel that if you are able to speak for yourself and eventually access media attention you might be fine in the chaotic medical system. It's another situation if you can't speak for yourself, if you don't have strong advocates and if you are stigmatized with the labels of being old, prone to memory/insight problems or frank mental illness.

The most vulnerable among us are the old and the mentally ill. Who speaks for them? Their families. Here is one man speaking for his mother who can't understand why she was sent home dripping blood. These sorts of adverse events happen and investigations occur but in the end if there are no "learnings" to be gained from such adverse events in the system, they repeat. I guess they will continue to repeat until enough families go public with such poor outcomes for their old and frail family members. In this case, poor quality control led to this case of a senior being traumatised. It's the sort of situation no family member should endure and yet even worse things happen to folks and we don't hear about them. Maybe the silence should end and we should all do as Morris Tingley is doing here--which is going public. This is the sort of event that ensures that folks in health authorities ensure that adverse events don't repeat and that our most defenceless seniors and handicapped citizens get the care they need.


http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/new-brunswick/94-year-old-hospital-gown-needle-1.3990549

Moncton man says mother sent home from hospital in only a gown, needle in arm

Horizon Health says it will launch an investigation

Sarah Betts · CBC NewsFebruary 19, 2017
Morris Tingley
Morris Tingley, 69, said his elderly, sick mother was sent home from the Moncton Hospital wearing nothing but a hospital gown. She also still had a needle stuck in her arm. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)
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A New Brunswick man is demanding answers after he says his 94-year old mother was sent home in an ambulance from the Moncton Hospital wearing only a hospital gown and a needle stuck in her arm.
Morris Tingley, 69, sent his mother Josephine Hall to the hospital on Tuesday in an ambulance. He had packed her a night dress, a house coat, socks and boots for when it was time to leave.
On Wednesday, Hall was dropped off at home around 1:30 a.m.
"All she had on was a Johnny shirt and one of those flannelette sheets over her," Tingley said.
He was handed a bag by one of the paramedics driving the ambulance that escorted her home. In the bag were the clothes Tingley had sent with her.
After getting his mother inside, he noticed a trail of blood following them.
Needle
Josephine Hall, 94, had a needle hanging out of her arm and blood pouring out around it when she arrived home from a stay in the hospital. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)
"I said, 'Mom, where's the blood coming from?' And I looked and the blood was right straight from the front door, up the stairs, into the kitchen on the floor and it was pouring out of her arm," Tingley said.
"So, I got the Johnny shirt open and the blood was all over it, all over the floor. I looked and the needle was halfway out of her arm that they used to take blood out of in the hospital. They never removed it … the blood was pouring right out around it."
Josephine Hall
Hall holds out the arm the needle had been left in on her ride home in an ambulance. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)
Tingley said he spent more than an hour trying to stop the bleeding, finally covering it with a Band-Aid.
He said his mother has to be on an oxygen tank constantly, which is why she had to be transported home by an ambulance. Tingley is her sole caregiver, and she cannot be left alone. The only chance he gets to run errands is when a nurse comes by three times a week.
During the ordeal, he said Hall didn't understand what was happening.
"For a senior citizen to come out of the Moncton Hospital, send her home with nothing on but a Johnny shirt when all the other stuff was with her, and leave that needle in her arm? Do you think that's right?"
Gown and blanket
Tingley said his cleaning lady washed the blood out of the hospital gown and the sheet Hall came home in. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)
Tingley said he phoned the head nurse at the hospital, but no one has phoned him back to offer an explanation.
CBC spoke to Sandy Vigneau, environmental services manager at the hospital, and the on-call spokesperson for Horizon Health. Vigneau said she had no knowledge of the matter. She could not comment on the case, but said she would launch an investigation into the matter.
When asked if it hurt, Hall said, "Yes, it did. Darn right it did."
Hall said she was neglected for hours and would appreciate an apology.
"I would like to have an apology from the hospital. I sure would."
With files from Matthew BingleyReport Typo

Julie Ali
Just now
This is not as mind boggling as you would expect. I've taken family to hospital and have had doctors tell me that there is no beds available and to call the government of Alberta. Other times they have said -what should we do about resuscitation when the green sleeve has the personal directive indicating full resuscitation. I've looked at data now in my sister's file that shows the doctors discussing her health choice of no intubation as being reasonable when she had sky high CO2 levels. The only constant in this business is the most vulnerable defenceless seniors are at risk and need strong advocates. Good thing this senior has one because without such advocates, it's very difficult to access supports and services in a productive fashion.

A Moncton man says his 94-year old mother was sent home from the hospital in an ambulance at 1:30 a.m., with nothing on but a hospital gown and a needle stuck in…
CBC.CA

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