Tuesday, February 14, 2017

The night the police were called, Harris said, Hanson showed up and created “a ruckus.” “He may be 90, but he’s got a lot of fight in him,” Harris said. Hanson and his friends got “boisterous,” so the police were called.-----------Probably the only thing close to criminal he’s ever done is to lie about his age to sign up with the navy at 17 to serve in the war. He was a gunner on the destroyer HMCS Restigouche (nicknamed Rusty Guts) out of Halifax and made several treacherous trips in the North Sea.-----But last November, Hanson was banned for 180 days — a long time when you’re 90 — from the Legion’s Victory branch 317 in London for breaking its rules.--------------The branch president, Nellie Stevens, said Hanson has been “creating a problem” and they have “quite a file on him.”

I finally made it through ten million pieces of laundry and I will be done tomorrow.
I hope to bring Rebecca home for a visit as it is nice outside.
The lawsuit prep is going well. I believe this is good practice for the working group to have this sort of experience for future retribution issues.

Since we have so much data to go through I am simply doing what I can and then taking a break to surf the web. There is no point getting your knickers in a twist.  In general the truth is not defamation. But of course proving the truth takes energy and time.  I have the energy and the time.

My older brother called today and we had a nice chat.  Older boy called to find out the status of the family and I told him the lawsuit was progressing. He's interested in how it will turn out. Younger boy is oblivious to the lawsuit and simply works like a small moth about the lit screen of his computer.

Valentine's Day was nice and we have finished a delicious supper that was not cooked by me.  I will spend five seconds reviewing the news before having my nap.  As I said, when you are being sued by the Good Samaritan Society it is best not to get your knickers in a twist and have naps as needed.

I was reading the news and discovered that the Trespass to Premises legislation is used all over the place for dumb reasons.
Not only do the continuing care providers get rid of advocates and family members from their premises but other organisations do the same sort of junk. Here is a case of banning of an elder for no good reason that I can determine; in any case I wonder how a 90 year old man could cause major problems for the Canadian Legion. It seems odd to me. Then after banning him he was told to beat it as he would be trespassing. And as we all know there is no appeal process in the Trespass to Premises legislation because we live in Russia in Alberta and maybe Russia all over Canada.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/national/canadian+legion+bans+year+veteran+promoting+music/12910738/story.html

The branch president, Nellie Stevens, said Hanson has been “creating a problem” and they have “quite a file on him.”


http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/national/canadian+legion+bans+year+veteran+promoting+music/12910738/story.html

Then it got worse. After he was banned for band promotion, and lost an appeal, Hanson headed down to the legion on a Saturday night, the usual country music night, wanting to talk to one of the legion’s executive.
Instead, the bar steward said he was trespassing and called the police. Everyone saw it. Even the police officer, Hanson said, “was disgusted.”

And so, the recently widowed veteran of the Royal Canadian Navy was unceremoniously escorted home in a cop car to his senior’s apartment.
*******
Of course anyone can use the Trespass to Premises legislation but sometimes you must understand that the use of legislation against essentially harmless folks is so punitive as to be egregious and does nothing to raise the profile of organizations such as the Canadian Legion. In my opinion, this sort of action is rather over the top. It's hurt this man's feelings and really isn't there a better way to deal with any problems such as resolution and not retribution?

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/national/canadian+legion+bans+year+veteran+promoting+music/12910738/story.html

Probably the only thing close to criminal he’s ever done is to lie about his age to sign up with the navy at 17 to serve in the war. He was a gunner on the destroyer HMCS Restigouche (nicknamed Rusty Guts) out of Halifax and made several treacherous trips in the North Sea.
#Resolution Not Retribution--the Trespass to Premises legislation is used by many organisations for no good reason and usually does not enhance the reputation of the organisation using the hammer. The legislation does not have an appeal process and this senior was basically taken by the police from the Canadian Legion property because he was creating a "ruckus". Hmm... I kind of wonder what sort of commotion a 90 year old senior would cause but there you go. We live in Russia in Alberta and Russia all over Canada.
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http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/national/canadian+legion+bans+year+veteran+promoting+music/12910738/story.html

Canadian Legion bans 90-year-old veteran for promoting music nights at another club

JANE SIMS, THE LONDON FREE PRESS, POSTMEDIA NEWS  02.14.2017
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Second World War veteran Bob Hanson was kicked out of a legion in London, Ont.: "I didn't think I was doing anything wrong.”
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Second World War veteran Bob Hanson, 90, shows his medals.
LONDON, Ont. — It was a long, humiliating ride home in a London police cruiser for Second World War veteran Bob Hanson.
For 70 of the sailor’s 90 years, he’s been heading off to local Royal Canadian Legion branches to meet up with his buddies, swap war stories, listen to music and dance.
But last November, Hanson was banned for 180 days — a long time when you’re 90 — from the Legion’s Victory branch 317 in London for breaking its rules.
His infraction? Handing out business card-sized flyers of a country music band schedule he’d set up at another London club.
The events were scheduled at the same time the legion had its own music nights. Apparently, that was serious enough to ban a man who faced down the enemy in the North Atlantic and helped secure the freedoms Canadians have today.
Then it got worse. After he was banned for band promotion, and lost an appeal, Hanson headed down to the legion on a Saturday night, the usual country music night, wanting to talk to one of the legion’s executive.
Instead, the bar steward said he was trespassing and called the police. Everyone saw it. Even the police officer, Hanson said, “was disgusted.”
“I was exercising my rights. I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong,” he said in an interview.
“I’m not looking for sympathy. They just ruined my reputation,” he said.
And so, the recently widowed veteran of the Royal Canadian Navy was unceremoniously escorted home in a cop car to his senior’s apartment.
“The situation as to why he was banned had to do with clubhouse rules and conduct,” said Brian Harris, the executive member who handled the discipline. “And being a military man, I would have thought Bob would understand that.” But there’s more to the tale than just rule-breaking.
It’s about a fading older generation, entrenched in tradition and community work, at odds with new-fangled ideas.
And you have to know a little bit more about Hanson. Some would call him spunky; others, feisty. Everyone would say he holds strong opinions.
There are things about the way the legion is run that he doesn’t like. In protest, he stopped paying a membership.
Probably the only thing close to criminal he’s ever done is to lie about his age to sign up with the navy at 17 to serve in the war. He was a gunner on the destroyer HMCS Restigouche (nicknamed Rusty Guts) out of Halifax and made several treacherous trips in the North Sea.
In 1946, he and a buddy went to the Palais Royale in Toronto for “dime-a-dance” night where he met his wife, Lorraine. He can tell you what she wore. Their first dance was to the song Near You.
“She was a fabulous dancer,” he said.
Hanson was no slouch either, picking up prizes over the years at jitterbug competitions. He was also a reigning limbo champ.
He worked for Bell Telephone and took university courses to become a communications engineer in Toronto. After he retired, he and Lorraine moved to London in 1999 to be closer to some family. They moved to a seniors’ apartment building a year ago.
Lorraine died last May after an illness. Hanson’s eyes well up just mentioning her name.
He may be 90, but he’s got a lot of fight in him.
Music always played in the background of their lives. He and Lorraine went out dancing practically every week. Their favourite was old country music, not the modern-day rock-and-roll stuff, but “the kind you can dance to.” Even Elvis is a little too racy for Hanson.
On Saturday nights, they’d go to the Victory branch for the weekly country dance. They got to know the bands and would follow them to other venues like Purple Hill, east of the city.
Hanson got in trouble with the executive some time ago when he put up Purple Hill’s schedule on the legion’s bulletin board. He said he agreed he did wrong and took it down.
But, when word came last summer that the country music night format was being changed to tribute bands and modern music, Hanson decided he’d help the bands he and his friends loved find a new place to play. And he insists he was transparent with the legion bar steward about what he was up to.
“The gang that loved the old classic country were getting disappointed and they wouldn’t come out,” he said.
Hanson secured a spot at the Marconi Club in London. He drew up some small flyers to hand out to his friends. He told them to put them in their pockets and not to leave them out at the legion.
The bar steward, Hanson said, found a couple left on the tables. Hanson was reported to the executive, then told not to come back for six months.
So, Hanson wrote a letter to the legion’s Ontario Command and to the newspaper.
The legion’s executive insists this isn’t Hanson’s first trip to the brig, and that he’s run afoul of other veterans’ organizations (something Hanson denies). The branch president, Nellie Stevens, said Hanson has been “creating a problem” and they have “quite a file on him.”
Harris said Hanson has been given “several warnings and interviews and letters and what-not” over the years. This time, Harris asked for an apology. Hanson refused.
They’ve told Hanson if he needs help with pensions and benefits, “we’ll be there in a second.”
But the house rules are posted and must be followed, Harris said. Promoting other events that run at the same time as legion affairs cuts into their business and their mission to help seniors and youth.
“He broke the rules,” Harris said. “It’s the same whether you’re 90 or a 24-year-old veteran. There are certain things you can’t do.”
The night the police were called, Harris said, Hanson showed up and created “a ruckus.”
“He may be 90, but he’s got a lot of fight in him,” Harris said.
Hanson and his friends got “boisterous,” so the police were called.
Hanson likes to “stir the pot,” Harris said. “Everybody at his table is just like Bob and they get fired up.”
But Harris said he’s willing to extend an olive branch. “I’m not retreating, I’m going to have a talk with Bob and see what we can do, see if we can put all the bygones in the past.”
Hanson isn’t buying it. “I don’t understand what he’s trying to do,” he said.
The old vet wants an apology “and my dignity back.”
Most of all, he wants to hang out with his pals. “I miss those guys,” he said.

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