Thursday, February 16, 2017

The family of Olga Penner, who died in a Cold Lake hospital earlier this month, and the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees have raised concerns about the quality of care provided by the replacement workers. Penner, who was 85 and suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, was removed from Points West Living by her family and taken by ambulance to hospital just days before she died. Following Penner’s death and complaints from the family, AHS launched an investigation. Since then, all the residents have been given a full physical assessment by a registered nurse and nurses are currently at the facility reviewing the care residents are receiving. Members of AHS senior leadership have also visited the facility every day.------Julie Ali · University of Alberta This situation is very similar to what happened to my sister at another care facility--the Good Samaritan Extended Care at Millwoods in Edmonton. After a long delay and many complaints by families, there were three audits done (Quality Audit, Respiratory Review, Continuing Care Health Services Standards audit). We also had two validated Protection for Persons in Care abuse cases. These investigations showed that care standards were not being met. For example there were care plans that were missing or years out of date. Like this case, patients had to be reasssesed by AHS. Why? Frankly, monitoring and enforcement by Alberta Health is currently ineffectual, occurring, after the fact. Why is it that families have to be the watchdogs for the system? Why do families have to raise the alarm so that investigations are initiated? Why can't we have effective monitoring and enforcement instead of reactive governance? The government needs to do better and there needs to be real penalties for non-compliances. Rather than expressing condolences and having daily visits by AHS senior leadership- after deaths---why isn't the government dealing with the problems of the continuing care system proactively?


The problems in the continuing care system seen in my handicapped sister's case continue in this case at the Points West Living facility.

LikeShow more reactions
Comment
Comments

http://edmontonjournal.com/news/politics/ahs-investigates-cold-lake-seniors-care-facility-after-resident-dies-in-hospital

Cold Lake seniors care facility being investigated after resident dies in hospital

Published on: February 16, 2017 | Last Updated: February 16, 2017 4:35 PM MST
Alberta Health Services is reviewing an assisted living facility in Cold Lake after an elderly woman who was removed from the residence later died in hospital.
Any recommendations resulting from the review will be implemented, Timothy Wilson, a spokesman for Alberta Health, said in an emailed statement, which also expressed condolences to the woman’s family.
A labour dispute has left seniors’ care workers locked out of the facility since Dec. 16. The family of Olga Penner, who died in a Cold Lake hospital earlier this month, and the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees have raised concerns about the quality of care provided by the replacement workers.
Penner, who was 85 and suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, was removed from Points West Living by her family and taken by ambulance to hospital just days before she died.
Following Penner’s death and complaints from the family, AHS launched an investigation. Since then, all the residents have been given a full physical assessment by a registered nurse and nurses are currently at the facility reviewing the care residents are receiving. Members of AHS senior leadership have also visited the facility every day.
In the statement, Wilson said the government and AHS will act on the recommendations and “expects the facility to do the same.”
Penner originally moved to the facility in November, before the lockout, and her family said the care she received originally was “great.”
sxthomson@postmedia.com
twitter.com/stuartxthomson



Julie Ali · 
This situation is very similar to what happened to my sister at another care facility--the Good Samaritan Extended Care at Millwoods in Edmonton. After a long delay and many complaints by families, there were three audits done (Quality Audit, Respiratory Review, Continuing Care Health Services Standards audit). We also had two validated Protection for Persons in Care abuse cases.

These investigations showed that care standards were not being met. For example there were care plans that were missing or years out of date. Like this case, patients had to be reasssesed by AHS. Why? Frankly, monitoring and enforcement by Alberta Health is currently ineffectual, occurring, after the fact.

Why is it that families have to be the watchdogs for the system? Why do families have to raise the alarm so that investigations are initiated? Why can't we have effective monitoring and enforcement instead of reactive governance? The government needs to do better and there needs to be real penalties for non-compliances. Rather than expressing condolences and having daily visits by AHS senior leadership- after deaths---why isn't the government dealing with the problems of the continuing care system proactively?
LikeReply1Just nowEdited
Brenda Johnston
When is Alberta Health going to wake up and regulate these care facilities, penalize them for any infractions, and ensure that proper nursing care and staffing levels are provided?! Privatization of care of our vulnerable has resulted in a profit over people situation that lines the pockets of CEOs and shareholders like Points West Living. Hospital beds are full of residents who could be cared for in their own residence facility if these facilities were forced to comply to standards of care. Enough is enough!
LikeReply16 hrs
Toni Seerden
It sounds good in theory but Alzheimers opens up a whole new can of worms. Assistance and supervision are usually required to an escalating degree. It's very sad.
LikeReply5 hrs
Brenda Johnston
Toni Seerden to my knowledge there are designated dementia units which in my humble opinion should be staffed with nurses and care personnel trained specifically in dementia care. It's a complex and degenerative condition to be sure, and acute care is holding many of these patients awaiting the proper facilities. The placement process is slow and many of these patients wait for months in an acute care setting for an appropriate placement. The system is broken. For profit elder care is a big problem in care levels and staffing for the safety of patients. The placement process is overloaded and logjammed at a central placement office, delaying proper placement often so long that the patient condition deteriorates and must be reassessed for another level of care. Social supports for patients also many times must be accessed in order to afford the high costs of elder care, acute care facilities carry the burden of these wait times while the placement agencies cross their 'T's and dot their 'I's and many times encounter opposition from families who will not accept a placement option for their loved one. The hoarded are at the gate with our aging population, and we must perfect these processes now.
LikeReply24 hrs
Karen Olivier
hire a lawyer dear people. You will win.
UnlikeReply22 hrs

No comments:

Post a Comment