Saturday, February 18, 2017

-The increase in the annual health care transfer was to fall this year from six per cent to three per cent, or the rate of annual GDP growth. The deal boosted B.C.’s federal health care transfers by 4.4 per cent annually, including $786 million for home care services (which Ottawa had previously promised) and $655 million to support mental health initiatives. The funding is over 10 years.---------Julie Ali · University of Alberta It was a smart move by the BC government to settle with the federal government especially during an election year. Money is now available that can be dedicated to mental health services provision which is always in disarray because no one in government cares about the most disadvantaged citizens. The mentally ill lack a voice in our society and without effective advocates, cannot access services and supports to ensure survival. In Alberta, we have the government playing politics while the mental health system is in crisis. We have no sort of integrated complex care planning for the mentally ill who are treated like junk. The requirement for accommodations is ignored. A recent case of a mentally ill woman being denied help three times in a row has occurred in Edmonton. This woman committed suicide when she should have been hospitalized; this case of refusal of services has now resulted in a lawsuit which in my opinion, is completely warranted.. The mentally ill have a right to health services and refusal to provide services should result in legal challenges of this sort. http://www.edmontonsun.com/.../family-of-suicide-victim... Family of suicide victim sues Alberta Hospital for alleged non-admittance *** This sort of junk happens because the mentally ill cannot advocate for themselves; their families are burnt out and we have crisis situations where no one has the intelligence to put the patients first. It is all about the money in Alberta. Rather than provide mental health services that is the right of these citizens we have doctors who tell families that there is no room at the hospitals. My feeling is that the government of Alberta needs to find the room for these citizens as lawsuits of this sort will prove to be costly for the public purse. There is absolutely no need to deny services and yet we have such failures. We even have mentally ill citizens who are given do not resuscitate orders because they are not compliant with pre-emergency care but no one seems to consider that there needs to be a compliance program provided to such citizens in the first place. The fact of the matter is that the mentally ill citizen is considered to be a throwaway citizen and without strong advocates, will not be able to navigate the system or access the help required to stay alive. Based on the current messes in Alberta, I think the government of BC has done a sensible thing in at least getting dedicated money into the system. This dedicated money at least may fund the system so that help may trickle down to the least among us. It's time for all provinces, including Alberta to provide the services and supports to disabled citizens -especially to the most defenceless citizens with mental health conditions. #MakeTheDealABHealth #MentalHealthCrisis

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http://www.theprovince.com/news/politics/gets+money+addictions+mental+health+federal+deal/12931749/story.html



B.C. gets money for addictions and mental health in federal deal

ROB SHAW(Vancouver Sun)
Published: February 16, 2017
Updated: February 17, 2017 8:04 PM
Filed Under:
The Province > Health > Local Health
Jane Philpott Terry Lake
Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott (right) and her B.C. counterpart Terry Lake announce their governments have reached an agreement on health care funding at a news conference in Richmond on Friday.DARRYL DYCK / VANCOUVER SUN
Jane Philpott Terry Lake
Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott listens as her B.C. counterpart Terry Lake speaks at a Friday news conference in Richmond on their governments’ agreement on health care funding.DARRYL DYCK / VANCOUVER SUN
Terry Lake, Jane Philpott
Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott (right) and her B.C. counterpart Terry Lake announce their governments have reached an agreement on health care funding at a news conference in Richmond on Friday.DARRYL DYCK / VANCOUVER SUN
012017-BC_Drug_Overdoses_20160609-0121_lake_overdose-W.jpg
B.C. Health Minister Terry Lake, front right, and Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe, from left to right, Dr. Mark Tyndall, Executive Director of the B.C. Centre for Disease Control, and Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall listen during a news conference after a meeting about the drug overdose emergency situation in the province, in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday June 9, 2016.DARRYL DYCK / VANCOUVER SUN
VICTORIA — After decrying Ottawa’s “divide and conquer” approach on health care agreements, British Columbia signed its own side deal on Friday to get extra cash for its ongoing drug-overdose crisis.
B.C. had been one of the most vocal critics of Ottawa’s strategy to pick off provinces one by one with special agreements, rather than negotiate across-the-board health transfers with all the provinces. Health Minister Terry Lake had described the federal offers as “take it or leave it,” shockingly low and an attempt to “divide and conquer” the provinces.
But B.C. officials said Friday they eventually decided to settle the feud, because they wanted to present a united Canadian front to the new U.S. administration of President Donald Trump in the softwood lumber trade dispute.
Lake and his federal counterpart, Health Minister Jane Philpott, announced the funding in Richmond.
“Ottawa has been a very tough negotiator,” said Lake. “I would be lying if we didn’t say we were hoping for more. But now we have this agreement and it’s time to get to work.”
Lake also added that he “doesn’t make these decisions in isolation,” and mentioned Premier Christy Clark and Finance Minister Mike de Jong as being involved in deciding “we needed to move on and get busy with the work ahead of us.”
The increase in the annual health care transfer was to fall this year from six per cent to three per cent, or the rate of annual GDP growth.
The deal boosted B.C.’s federal health care transfers by 4.4 per cent annually, including $786 million for home care services (which Ottawa had previously promised) and $655 million to support mental health initiatives. The funding is over 10 years.
“We know this kind of agreement and support will assist the Government of British Columbia as they work to reduce wait times for mental health care and services especially children and youth,” said Philpott, who added the money will also help seniors stay in their homes for care rather than in hospitals.
The deal also includes $10 million to help fight the overdose crisis. Lake said B.C.’s budget, to be unveiled Tuesday, will add $5 million to the opioid task force.
B.C.’s coroner announced Friday that 116 people died from overdoses, down from 142 in December but “still far too high,” said Lake.
There were 914 deaths from overdoses in B.C. in 2016, which is a more than 80 per cent increase from 2015.
“I’d just like to note none of those deaths occurred at a supervised consumption site or an overdose prevention site,” said Lake.
He said the new federal funding “could do things like broaden the availability of Suboxone so that people have faster access to treatment” across B.C.
B.C. Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe announced Friday she was backing a proposal from chief medical health officer Perry Kendall to offer clean medical-grade heroin to those people suffering from addictions for whom oral-based treatment like Suboxone and methadone is ineffective.
That idea needs to be studied further because the public may not be ready to support free heroin, Lake has said.
On Friday, Philpott said Ottawa is still not interested in legalizing illicit drugs in order to reduce the stigma and remove the drugs from the black market and into clean settings. “There’s no discussion here about legalizing all drugs,” she said.
The last-minute deal will affect B.C.’s provincial budget, set to be tabled Tuesday. Finance officials said it’s too late to change the budget figures, and so the document will still contain old pre-deal health funding projections.
In its most recent quarterly financial update, B.C. said it was set to lose $142 million in federal health funding in 2017-18 and $285 million in 2018-19. That was the equivalent of 5,170 complex hip replacements or 1,023 lung transplants annually, according to government financial figures.
The federal health transfers are significant because health care spending is the single largest expense in B.C.’s budget, eating up almost 41 per cent of the total $48-billion annual budget. Federal health transfers are worth almost $5 billion, and B.C. relies upon the money to help fund around half of the increase to health spending each year.
The new funding for home care services will add additional direct care hours in care homes and additional home care visits for people, said Daniel Fontaine, CEO of the B.C. Care Providers Association.
“I think when you combine it with what I’m hoping will come out of the provincial budget next week … I think it will have a significant impact,” he said. His organization has called for B.C. to begin shifting money from the acute care hospital budgets into services that treat people (mainly seniors) in their homes where possible, which is cheaper and provides better service than a hospital.
A recent association report called for $330 million per year over the next five years to help build new care homes, increase direct care hours and increase minimum home care visit times. Fontaine said he hopes to see that money in Tuesday’s budget.
There are still four provinces that have not signed federal health deals: Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and Manitoba.
Lake said he spoke to many of the politicians in those provinces and “they understand” B.C.’s decision.
rshaw@postmedia.com
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Julie Ali · 

It was a smart move by the BC government to settle with the federal government especially during an election year. Money is now available that can be dedicated to mental health services provision which is always in disarray because no one in government cares about the most disadvantaged citizens. The mentally ill lack a voice in our society and without effective advocates, cannot access services and supports to ensure survival.

In Alberta, we have the government playing politics while the mental health system is in crisis. We have no sort of integrated complex care planning for the mentally ill who are treated like junk. The requirement for accommodations is ignored. A recent case of a mentally ill woman being denied help three times in a row has occurred in Edmonton. This woman committed suicide when she should have been hospitalized; this case of refusal of services has now resulted in a lawsuit which in my opinion, is completely warranted.. The mentally ill have a right to health services and refusal to provide services should result in legal challenges of this sort.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/.../family-of-suicide-victim...
Family of suicide victim sues Alberta Hospital for alleged non-admittance

***
This sort of junk happens because the mentally ill cannot advocate for themselves; their families are burnt out and we have crisis situations where no one has the intelligence to put the patients first. It is all about the money in Alberta. Rather than provide mental health services that is the right of these citizens we have doctors who tell families that there is no room at the hospitals. My feeling is that the government of Alberta needs to find the room for these citizens as lawsuits of this sort will prove to be costly for the public purse. There is absolutely no need to deny services and yet we have such failures.

We even have mentally ill citizens who are given do not resuscitate orders because they are not compliant with pre-emergency care but no one seems to consider that there needs to be a compliance program provided to such citizens in the first place.

The fact of the matter is that the mentally ill citizen is considered to be a throwaway citizen and without strong advocates, will not be able to navigate the system or access the help required to stay alive.

Based on the current messes in Alberta, I think the government of BC has done a sensible thing in at least getting dedicated money into the system. This dedicated money at least may fund the system so that help may trickle down to the least among us. It's time for all provinces, including Alberta to provide the services and supports to disabled citizens -especially to the most defenceless citizens with mental health conditions. #MakeTheDealABHealth#MentalHealthCrisis

http://www.edmontonsun.com/2016/02/26/family-of-suicide-victim-sues-alberta-hospital-for-alleged-non-admittance

Family of suicide victim sues Alberta Hospital for alleged non-admittance



FIRST POSTED: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2016 03:52 PM MST | UPDATED: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2016 06:47 PM MST
Edmonton Law Courts
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EDMONTON - A mentally ill Edmonton woman's family is claiming she jumped to her death from the seventh floor of the Chateau Lacombe after being turned away at Alberta Hospital.
And the family says in a recent $753,000 lawsuit against the province that it was the third time she was refused admittance at a psychiatric facility — despite her clear need for treatment — and sent away in a taxi.
In a statement of claim filed in court on Feb. 19, the daughter, parents and brother of Janette Peterson allege she was a diagnosed psychiatric patient who had been hospitalized for suicidal tendencies a number of times.
The family claims she took "definite and extreme steps" to attempt suicide in February 2014 -- including renting a hotel room and hiring strangers to harm her -- and say that and all of her treatment records were fully available on the net care system for medical professionals to review.
The family alleges that Peterson, who is diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder, had twice tried to commit herself to the Royal Alexandra Hospital's psychiatric unit for her own personal safety and she was denied admittance, provided with cab fare and told to go home.
According to the statement of claim, Peterson posed a clear and imminent threat to herself on Feb. 22, 2014, and her daughter and a friend took her to Alberta Hospital.
The family alleges Peterson clearly presented as suicidal and likely non-compliant with her medications and the admitting nurse assured them that she would be assessed.
However, instead of assessing or admitting Peterson, the family alleges that the hospital turned her away and called her a cab.
According to the statement of claim, Peterson checked herself in at the downtown Chateau Lacombe and jumped to her death from the seventh floor on Feb. 23, 2014.
The family alleges the death was the result of negligence by the doctors and staff at the two hospitals for failing to admit her, failing to properly monitor her and for failing to notify the family that she had been denied admission.
They claim the defendants, which include Alberta Health Services, Alberta Hospital, Royal Alexandra Hospital, the admitting nurse and several doctors and staff members, have a duty to both Peterson and the general public to admit those who are suffering from mental disorders and are likely to cause harm to themselves or others.
The statement of claim also alleges that the defendants have a duty to ensure that "bed pressure" does not result in patients in demonstrable need being turned away.
Statements of defence have not yet been filed.
Statements of claim and statements of defence contain allegations which have not been proven.

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