Saturday, February 25, 2017

if you wish for entertainment-----------4 pillars of performance measures The key 4 pillars – health status, patient experience, care outcomes and value for money – are the guiding priorities for the development of measures. The Framework identifies measures for both the population outcome and the system outcomes, which are grouped under 3 domains: health status, health system performance, and health care outcomes. PMIS uses Alberta’s Health System Measurement Classification Approach to put measures into the 4 performance domains: population health, health services delivery, governance and community engagement, and health system sustainability.---According to the statement of claim, Peterson checked herself in at the downtown Chateau Lacombe and jumped to her death from the seventh floor on Feb. 23, 2014. The family alleges the death was the result of negligence by the doctors and staff at the two hospitals for failing to admit her, failing to properly monitor her and for failing to notify the family that she had been denied admission. They claim the defendants, which include Alberta Health Services, Alberta Hospital, Royal Alexandra Hospital, the admitting nurse and several doctors and staff members, have a duty to both Peterson and the general public to admit those who are suffering from mental disorders and are likely to cause harm to themselves or others. The statement of claim also alleges that the defendants have a duty to ensure that "bed pressure" does not result in patients in demonstrable need being turned away.-

There was no reason for Janette Peterson to be denied service but it does happen. If you don't have strong advocates who are with you this sort of denial of service occurs and if you don't have a safe place to stay -well the worst possible outcome happens. If we cannot trust our medical system to keep psychiatric patients safe what are families to do? I'd say we go public with our stories so that we change the system that is currently not helping psychiatric patients as they need to be helped. Dedicated funds should be provided as per the health accord that Alberta still has not signed. #MakeTheDealAbHealth

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although the past has happened
and should be put away
the lessons contained in errors
are not meant for disarray

the learnings of the errors
can be put to further use
and the failures in the system
can the leaders disabuse

of their pleadings of good performance
the reality's not the same
as their spin on world wide media
the results are really tame

I wish you could see the data
that indicates to me
that handicapped citizens
have no security

but of course you'll trust the system
that system that families know
is full of gaps and chasms
that only victims show

if you wish for entertainment
go to the government site
that preaches of good performance
when the reality is rather blight

http://www.edmontonsun.com/2016/02/26/family-of-suicide-victim-sues-alberta-hospital-for-alleged-non-admittance


Family of suicide victim sues Alberta Hospital for alleged non-admittance



FIRST POSTED: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2016 03:52 PM MST | UPDATED: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2016 06:47 PM MST
Edmonton Law CourtsEdmonton Law Courts
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EDMONTON - A mentally ill Edmonton woman's family is claiming she jumped to her death from the seventh floor of the Chateau Lacombe after being turned away at Alberta Hospital.
And the family says in a recent $753,000 lawsuit against the province that it was the third time she was refused admittance at a psychiatric facility — despite her clear need for treatment — and sent away in a taxi.
In a statement of claim filed in court on Feb. 19, the daughter, parents and brother of Janette Peterson allege she was a diagnosed psychiatric patient who had been hospitalized for suicidal tendencies a number of times.
The family claims she took "definite and extreme steps" to attempt suicide in February 2014 -- including renting a hotel room and hiring strangers to harm her -- and say that and all of her treatment records were fully available on the net care system for medical professionals to review.
The family alleges that Peterson, who is diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder, had twice tried to commit herself to the Royal Alexandra Hospital's psychiatric unit for her own personal safety and she was denied admittance, provided with cab fare and told to go home.
According to the statement of claim, Peterson posed a clear and imminent threat to herself on Feb. 22, 2014, and her daughter and a friend took her to Alberta Hospital.
The family alleges Peterson clearly presented as suicidal and likely non-compliant with her medications and the admitting nurse assured them that she would be assessed.
However, instead of assessing or admitting Peterson, the family alleges that the hospital turned her away and called her a cab.
According to the statement of claim, Peterson checked herself in at the downtown Chateau Lacombe and jumped to her death from the seventh floor on Feb. 23, 2014.
The family alleges the death was the result of negligence by the doctors and staff at the two hospitals for failing to admit her, failing to properly monitor her and for failing to notify the family that she had been denied admission.
They claim the defendants, which include Alberta Health Services, Alberta Hospital, Royal Alexandra Hospital, the admitting nurse and several doctors and staff members, have a duty to both Peterson and the general public to admit those who are suffering from mental disorders and are likely to cause harm to themselves or others.
The statement of claim also alleges that the defendants have a duty to ensure that "bed pressure" does not result in patients in demonstrable need being turned away.
Statements of defence have not yet been filed.

Statements of claim and statements of defence contain allegations which have not been proven.


http://www.health.alberta.ca/newsroom/PMIS.html


Performance Measures Information System

The Performance Measures Information System (PMIS) provides information on Alberta’s health system performance measures. PMIS is used to classify Alberta’s health system performance measures into domains and dimensions, identifies measurement gaps, and promotes a common understanding and use of measures across our health system.
PMIS helps to ensure consistency of definitions and eliminates problems associated with the recording and storing of performance measure information in multiple formats and locations.

Health System Outcomes and Measurement Framework

The Health System Outcomes and Measurement Framework PDF icon (the Framework) was identified as a ministry priority and the purpose of the Framework is to provide a clear vision of health system success by identifying the outcomes Alberta’s health system is expected to achieve, as well as the logic model to achieve those outcomes and some of the measures that might be used to monitor performance.

4 pillars of performance measures

The key 4 pillars – health status, patient experience, care outcomes and value for money – are the guiding priorities for the development of measures. The Framework identifies measures for both the population outcome and the system outcomes, which are grouped under 3 domains: health status, health system performance, and health care outcomes.
PMIS uses Alberta’s Health System Measurement Classification Approach to put measures into the 4 performance domains: population health, health services delivery, governance and community engagement, and health system sustainability.

Performance measure categories and description

Under each of these performance domains, measures are categorized along dimensions of performance. The performance measures are also grouped under 5 categories: health system outcomes, strategic, emerging strategic, tactical, and transactional.
Category  Function  Comments
Health System OutcomesCombined, these constitute a balanced suite of measures used to assess health system performance from an outcomes perspective. • Measures overall health system performance outcomes.
• Enables system-level monitoring of health system performance. 
• May encompass and depend on multiple measures working in concert to affect health system outcomes.
• Used to report publicly on health system performance.
StrategicMeasures performance of key priority areas requiring improvement so as to close the gap between current and targeted performance. • Reflects government’s health care vision, agenda, priorities.
• Actionable, with targets, and clear lines of accountability to affect change within AHS, Alberta Health or partnering agencies. 
• Used to publicly report health system performance.
Emerging StrategicMeasures performance in a priority area of rising importance, but requires further development, understanding and use before being approved as a strategic measure.• Reflects emerging or existing strategic health system priorities.
• Actionable, with clear accountability; targets preferred, but discretionary during measure development.
• May not be publicly reported while under development.
TacticalInforms on the performance of an operational area; or reflects the performance of key drivers of a strategic measure. • Contributes to balanced performance monitoring and reporting within a performance domain at a tactical or operational level.
• Provides a link between strategic and transactional measures.
• Generally used for internal performance monitoring and reporting, but may be selected for public reporting.
TransactionalMeasures program, practice, or organizational service delivery performance priorities at the site, clinical, or administrative level.• Useful in setting performance expectations and monitoring performance at a local program, work unit or individual level.
• Provides a site, clinical, or administrative link to related strategic and tactical measures.
• More detailed extension of strategic and tactical measures.
Effective December 2011

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