Monday, February 27, 2017

--“If government agents would have passed along information that was vital in this instance, my wife wouldn’t be dead,” Valerie’s husband, Craig Wolski, said.--------------Saddleback was found mentally unfit to stand trial after being charged with manslaughter. He has severe developmental disabilities and operates at the level of a toddler.--“His actions sometimes did not seem to be provoked by anything. He could be fine one moment and then would lunge,” she explained. “We had hundreds of incident reports across the years. Volatile and explosive at times. We couldn’t predict.-------In the fatality report, it was written that on Feb. 13, 2011 a co-worker found Wolski on the floor of the living room, where “it was apparent that she had been dead for some time.” Saddleback was reportedly asleep on a couch until he woke up when the co-worker screamed Wolski’s name. The co-worker grabbed Wolski’s cellphone and fled the home after Saddleback reportedly moved toward her--------------“We recognize that a number of changes were made as a result of this devastating tragedy, including changes to risk assessment for complex need individuals and information-sharing so that staff and Albertans are kept safe and individuals’ support needs are best met. However, we know we have more work to do.-----------Julie Ali Just now · Shared via AddThis · #GOASPIN-- it is clear to me that the concerns of families who have mentally ill family members who need proper care are not being addressed by the GOA and so we have these consequences. Why does the GOA not provide integrated care plans for mentally ill patients and residential facilities that have full complements of staff such as those provided at Red Deer's Michener Centre? Complex care patients need full supports and services. Community based care can only work when workers are able to handle these cases and are supported by the GOA. This fatality report like all the others before them will be ignored because it is cheaper and easier for the GOA to pay out victim families than to do the work of supporting mentally ill citizens in a proper fashion. Alberta needs to make the deal with the federal government, put the dedicated mental health money where it is needed and walk the talk. Otherwise so many citizens have died in vain. #GOASPIN, #FATALITYInquiryRecommendationsIgnored

Community based care of mentally ill patients can work but there needs to be full supports and services provided. The poor performance of the GOA in this case is unacceptable. I see no reason for this fatality to have occurred. Appropriate risk management would have ensured that this client be taken care of in a place with integrated care teams and full oversight. The Michener Centre in Red Deer could be repurposed for such complex care needs patients but there is no will in the GOA to look into such solutions. There is also no will to implement any of the recommendations of the fatality inquiries in Alberta because this would require government to do its job.
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http://www.newstalk770.com/2017/02/01/fatality-report-finds-errors-contributed-to-death-of-alberta-mental-health-worker/
Fatality report finds errors contributed to death of Alberta mental health worker
Calgary,Alberta / News Talk 770 (CHQR)
Slav Kornik
Posted: February 01, 2017 04:41 pm
 | Last Updated: February 01, 2017 04:50 pm
WATCH ABOVE: The findings of a fatality inquiry into the death of Camrose caregiver Valerie Wolski were released Wednesday. Wolski was killed in 2011 by the person she was caring for. Kendra Slugoski has more on the fatality report findings.
A fatality report has found there were failings that contributed to the death of Camrose mental health worker Valerie Wolski, who was killed in a client’s home in 2011.
Wolski, 41, was the lone person providing care to Terrence Wade Saddleback in February 2011 when she was strangled.
Saddleback was found mentally unfit to stand trial after being charged with manslaughter. He has severe developmental disabilities and operates at the level of a toddler.
The Honourable B.D. Rosborough provided seven recommendations in the fatality report to prevent similar deaths from happening.
The first recommendation is that Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PDD) work with an outside agency to review and assist with any changes to improve the way it generates, secures and disseminates information to caregivers regarding developmentally disabled clients.
Rosborough stated that he believes PDD didn’t fully provide information about the extent of Saddleback’s developmental disability to the organization Wolski was employed by.
“The full SIS report of April 30, 2010 and Risk Assessment Update Report prepared in August 2009 are but two examples of documents or information which would be critically important to a community based caregiver such as the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA),” Rosborough wrote.
CMHA staff testified that Saddleback would not have been taken on as a client had that information been made available to them.
If government agents would have passed along information that was vital in this instance, my wife wouldn’t be dead,” Valerie’s husband, Craig Wolski, said.
Rosborough also re-recommends that at no time should a careworker be assigned to the care of a resident the worker can’t physically manage. The same recommendation was made in another fatality report a couple years before Wolski’s death. Saddleback is 6’5″ and 300 lbs.
Additionally, Rosborough suggests that at no time should a female careworker be assigned exclusive care of a client who has previously expressed or demonstrated aggression toward females.
“While, at times, Saddleback demonstrated aggression toward males, he had a proclivity to attack females,” Rosborough wrote. “In particular, he would grab them by the hair.”
The report stated the recommendations were made to address the failings, rather than “findings of legal responsibility or what may amount to conclusions of law.”
Craig Wolski is not confident the recommendations will be acted upon.
“Recommendations of this kind have been made repeatedly and they fall on deaf ears,” he said.
Marilyn Conner, executive director of a Wetaskiwin-area community organization, was one of the people who testified during the fatality inquiry in June 2016.
Conner described hundreds of incidents involving Saddleback during the 19 years caring for him. She said Saddleback was aggressive, violent and pulled hair.
“His actions sometimes did not seem to be provoked by anything. He could be fine one moment and then would lunge,” she explained. “We had hundreds of incident reports across the years. Volatile and explosive at times. We couldn’t predict.
“I can tell you seeing what I saw, hearing what I heard, decades of aggressive behaviour. It was really scary just walking in. For me, I felt there was something else going on with him that was beyond our capacity.”
By 2009, Conner said all but two staff members refused to work with Saddleback. That’s when a serious incident happened. She explained in court that a staff member was working with a client when Saddleback said hi to her. He then proceeded to pick her up by the hair and throw her into a table.
The organization told the province it could no longer care for Saddleback because he was too dangerous and staff were afraid of him.
The last incident resulted in five RCMP officers pepper spraying and handcuffing Saddleback to diffuse the situation, Conner stated in the inquiry report.
In the fatality report, it was written that on Feb. 13, 2011 a co-worker found Wolski on the floor of the living room, where “it was apparent that she had been dead for some time.”
Saddleback was reportedly asleep on a couch until he woke up when the co-worker screamed Wolski’s name. The co-worker grabbed Wolski’s cellphone and fled the home after Saddleback reportedly moved toward her.
The co-worker called police from her car. Police took Saddleback into custody after arriving at the scene.
Minister of Community and Social Services Irfan Sabir issued a statement on the fatality report:
“Our thoughts are with those who loved Ms. Wolski, and all those affected by this tragedy. No one should have to go to work in an environment where their life is at risk. In the PDD program, safety has always been about promoting not only safe and inclusive lives for the Albertans we serve, but also, and of equal importance, ensuring the safety and wellbeing of front-line workers who devote their lives to protecting others.
“We recognize that a number of changes were made as a result of this devastating tragedy, including changes to risk assessment for complex need individuals and information-sharing so that staff and Albertans are kept safe and individuals’ support needs are best met. However, we know we have more work to do.
“Our government values Judge Rosborough’s recommendations and we are committed to taking action on the recommendations as they relate to Community and Social Services, and working with our service delivery partners and accrediting bodies to review existing policies and practices with a view to outlining options for specialized services to adults with complex service needs. It is a priority of our government, partners and contracted service providers to ensure the safety of caregivers and Albertans, and we will work collaboratively to conduct a cross-jurisdictional analysis to explore best practices to improve safety for all involved.
“We owe it to Ms. Wolski, and indeed to all Albertans, to learn from this heartbreaking incident and do everything we can to prevent similar tragedies.”
Fatality Report Wolski by slavkornik on Scribd

#GOASPIN-- it is clear to me that the concerns of families who have mentally ill family members who need proper care are not being addressed by the GOA and so we have these consequences.
Why does the GOA not provide integrated care plans for mentally ill patients and residential facilities that have full complements of staff such as those provided at Red Deer's Michener Centre?
Complex care patients need full supports and services.
Community based care can only work when workers are able to handle these cases and are supported by the GOA.
This fatality report like all the others before them will be ignored because it is cheaper and easier for the GOA to pay out victim families than to do the work of supporting mentally ill citizens in a proper fashion.
Alberta needs to make the deal with the federal government, put the dedicated mental health money where it is needed and walk the talk.
Otherwise so many citizens have died in vain.
#GOASPIN, #FATALITYInquiryRecommendationsIgnored

WATCH ABOVE: The findings of a fatality inquiry into the death of Camrose caregiver Valerie Wolski were releas...
NEWSTALK770.COM

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