Friday, February 24, 2017

--Eight underpasses in Edmonton have flooded 17 times during intense rainstorms since 2004, including two on Whitemud Drive in July 2016. The underpasses are designed to flood when storms are severe. But with intense storms happening more frequently, city officials are trying to find a way to keep the public safe. Last time, firefighters were called to rescue drivers.--------Julie Ali · University of Alberta My dad lost one of his cars on Whitemud Drive because he drove into a flooded section. There was no warning. I don't know why this problem occurs. You would think that there would be preventative steps taken by the city when they build these structures. How is it possible for water to collect, and not be seen by a driver until it is too late and the car is sinking into the flood? I believe the city of Edmonton has liability issues with this problem. I don't think folks like my dad should have to pay for the loss of a car. Like · Reply · Just now · Edited

Why does the city of Edmonton have problems with flooding in the first place on city streets? I mean don't the pumps drain out the water on say the Whitemud freeway? So then why did my dad drive into a flooded area and lose his car?
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Councillors want appeal to 'common sense' on flooded underpasses

Published on: February 24, 2017 | Last Updated: February 24, 2017 6:09 PM MST
Shawna Serniak and her son Trylan, 19, were caught in a flooded underpass on the Whitemud during a torrential rainstorm in 2016. This picture was taken from Serniak's Facebook page, and shows the flood, taken from inside the family's Dodge Journey.
Shawna Serniak and her son Trylan, 19, were caught in a flooded underpass on the Whitemud during a torrential rainstorm in 2016. This picture was taken from Serniak's Facebook page, and shows the flood, taken from inside the family's Dodge Journey. SHAWNA SERNIAK / FACEBOOK
City officials are hoping to install warning signs and depth indicators at four Edmonton underpasses this spring to protect motorist against future floods.
“The real issue here is to get people fair warning,” said Coun. Ben Henderson, urging city officials Friday to get people accurate information quickly when freeway underpasses start to become dangerous and let each motorist make the call.
“To a certain extent, we need to depend on people’s common sense.”
Henderson was speaking at council’s utility committee at City Hall.
Eight underpasses in Edmonton have flooded 17 times during intense rainstorms since 2004, including two on Whitemud Drive in July 2016. The underpasses are designed to flood when storms are severe. But with intense storms happening more frequently, city officials are trying to find a way to keep the public safe.
Last time, firefighters were called to rescue drivers.

Pilot project

As a pilot project this summer, city officials intend to place temporary digital road signs beside up to four underpasses — two on Whitemud Drive at 111 Street and 106 Street, and likely two on Yellowhead Trail at 50 Street and 82 Street.
“Next time, it could be the north side that gets it,” warned Coun. Michael Walters.
All four of those intersections have sensors in the drains beneath, which turn on pumps as water levels increase. This spring, drainage operations will create an alert system so those sensors will also trigger an alarm at their headquarters, which is monitored 24 hours a day, said utility branch manager Chris Ward.
Staff will check the road cameras, and if the water is rising, they’ll turn on the emergency signs telling motorists to use caution and take an off ramp instead.

RELATED

Ward said they’ll also launch a general education campaign this spring to caution people against taking shelter under the overpasses during a hail storm or heavy rain.
Coun. Moe Banga said city officials should consider fixing the issue on Yellowhead Trail while construction is ongoing.
“We’ll take a look at that,” said Ward, promising to return with more information on the cost of infrastructure solutions in June. Other councillors were keen to try the lower cost options first.
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Julie Ali · 
My dad lost one of his cars on Whitemud Drive because he drove into a flooded section. There was no warning.

I don't know why this problem occurs. You would think that there would be preventative steps taken by the city when they build these structures. How is it possible for water to collect, and not be seen by a driver until it is too late and the car is sinking into the flood?

I believe the city of Edmonton has liability issues with this problem. I don't think folks like my dad should have to pay for the loss of a car.

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