Saturday, February 25, 2017

Angels at the Alex Just now I am at the Royal Alex Hospital. My mentally and physically challenged family member has just come out of eye surgery. I want to say that the staff have treated him with unbelievable care, understanding and compassion. We are truly blessed to have such wonderful human beings in these uncertain times. They are truly care angels. Edward S. Redshaw, Edmonton

Well deserved kudos to the RAH staff and not enough money for kids in schools because the school boards can't tax but are dependent on the government of Alberta for all monies. This is why the school board system isn't useful.
LikeShow more reactions
Comment

http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/letters/saturdays-letters-public-schools-serve-a-greater-good

Saturday's letters: Public schools serve a greater good
Published on: February 25, 2017 | Last Updated: February 25, 2017 6:00 AM MST
Joel French, executive director of Public Interest Alberta was joined by 13 other organizations urging the provincial government to phase out the public funding of private schools to strengthen public school systems across the province, in Edmonton, Thursday, February 23, 2017.
Joel French, executive director of Public Interest Alberta was joined by 13 other organizations urging the provincial government to phase out the public funding of private schools to strengthen public school systems across the province, in Edmonton, Thursday, February 23, 2017.ED KAISER / 20078862A
Although David Staples is correct in saying Alberta has a tremendous K-12 system, that is not because of competition from private schools.  The success of public education has to do with sustainable public funding, development of good curriculum, excellent preparation of and strong standards for teachers, and public trust such a system serves children well.
Public schools do not exist as expressions of private choice and interest, but serve a larger interest by providing equitable opportunities for children from all backgrounds, and the possibility to become citizens who can live with tolerance and understanding in a diverse society.
Another article in the Journal reports on some independent (private) schools refusing to implement the legal requirement to allow the establishment of gay-straight alliances. This article precisely shows a problem with public funding of private schools. Private schools may reflect specific cultural and religious beliefs that are part of the diverse makeup of society but they are not necessarily in the broader public interest — reflecting one of the reasons they should not be publicly funded.
Public education has a broader interest in building a safe, tolerant and enlightened society that is essential to a democratic society.
Hans Smits, Edmonton

Angels at the Alex

Just now I am at the Royal Alex Hospital. My mentally and physically challenged family member has just come out of eye surgery.
I want to say that the staff have treated him with unbelievable care, understanding and compassion. We are truly blessed to have such wonderful human beings in these uncertain times. They are truly care angels.
Edward S. Redshaw, Edmonton

Think before you write

Why do people like Harrison Ford get reported as having a “near miss?” A near miss is a hit. He either missed getting hit or he got hit.
Which brings up another point: Why do reporters talk about, “heading northbound,” and 9 a.m. in the morning? Heading and bound mean the same thing. And when else would 9 a.m. be — in the evening?
Oxymorons, redundancy, incorrect words and phrases and wrongly spelled words, not to mention malapropisms seem to be the writer’s stock in trade.
Why does no thought go into speech these days? Language is meant to be a means of communicating thoughts, not confusion. Am I the only one concerned about all those who pass on their ignorance to the uncritical?
Lynette Kent, Edmonton

Losing valley vista would be a shame

I travel on the bus past the Shaw Conference Centre four or more times a day. Today, after reading Harvey Voogd’s opinion piece, I realized that the view of the river valley from Jasper Avenue, just east of the conference centre is the best, unobstructed view from Jasper Avenue.
It would be a real shame to lose it. Also, I do not look forward to months, if not years, of construction.
Cecily Mills, Edmonton

Physician discipline is transparent

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta (CPSA) is very transparent about how we handle physician-related complaints — the entire process is outlined on our website. If a complaint goes to a disciplinary hearing, the hearing is open to the public and the hearing tribunal decision (which details the evidence presented) is posted at cpsa.ca. Tribunal decisions remain on the site for at least 5 years.
CPSA members are involved in disciplinary decisions. Every hearing tribunal consists of two physician members and one public member. Aided by legal counsel, they consider evidence and determine whether or not the physician is guilty of unprofessional conduct. The tribunal also determines penalty as specified in Alberta’a Health Professions Act.
As with the outcome of a court case, not everyone will agree with the decision, but the process could not be clearer. Details are available at cpsa.ca.
Dr. Trevor Theman, Registrar, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Alberta



Julie Ali ·
Re: Angels at the Alex

I have to agree with Dr. Redshaw about the angels at the RAH.
When my handicapped sister was very serious in 2013, the ICU at the RAH accepted her and did not follow the do not resuscitate order placed on her file by the Grey Nuns Hospital. They followed her personal directive that asked for full resuscitation.
I am very appreciative of the kindness of the doctors, nurses and respiratory staff at this facility.
LikeReplyJust now
Vernon Wise
"Public education has a broader interest in building a safe, tolerant and enlightened society that is essential to a democratic society."

I wish the ATA would quit arguing that having only public schools would be better for the children or society. The only reason the ATA wants private school funding stopped so the teachers union gets more money in their pockets. Unions hate anything privately run.
LikeReply23 hrs
Julie Ali ·
The main problem in the private versus public school debate is underfunding of education -especially special education. When the ability to tax was removed from school boards in Alberta by the PCs we had a vestigial political entity created that is basically only able to parrot what the government of Alberta says so that it can get some funding.

I don't know the particulars of the funding shortfalls right now but I do know when I looked at the budget for Grandvew Heights School when my son was attending--to determine what money was left for special education there was not much. This may be the reason why special education was not (in my opinion) being appropriately provided for and later on the school board made special education services a central administration matter.

In any case, there is not enough money. It has nothing to do with unions. It has everything to do with the way that government provides money for education. We don't need 61 school boards and 61 superintendents. We do need a single province wide school board system and fewer very expensive superintendent positions.
With the savings of such a move we would have better funding for education.

In BC I believe they had to go to court to get the right funding in place for kids. In Alberta there won't be any changes made in my opinion because government is not interested in kids or seniors.

This issue is about money plain and simple. And the money is there. It just is not there for our kids.
LikeReply2 mins

No comments:

Post a Comment