Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Julie Ali 1 min · Although I feel sorry for this man I can't agree with his position with reference to providing the death by doctor option to the mentally ill. We already have expansion of this junk to now have death by nurse probationer in Alberta. Soon we will have the same junk that goes on in Europe with kids with disabilities being done away with. The mentally ill are especially vulnerable as they may lack insight and not understand what they are agreeing to when this option is provided to them. I believe that death by doctor for the mentally ill is not acceptable. We already have doctors at the Grey Nuns Hospital in Edmonton imposing "Do Not Resuscitate" orders on mentally ill patients against the requirements of their Personal Directive for no other reason than they lacked the professionalism to do full work ups and reviews of the case. Why would we countenance legalized "Do not resuscitate" orders of the legal sort as provided by the Death by Doctor legislation? No, no and no. Windsor assisted dying advocate says his condition is getting worse Windsor man who has been fighting to get Ottawa to include mentally ill people in its assisted dying bill says his condition is getting worse. CBC.CA LikeShow more reactionsCommentShare

Julie Ali

4 mins
 Although I feel sorry for this man I can't agree with his position with reference to providing the death by doctor option to the mentally ill. We already have expansion of this junk to now have death by nurse probationer in Alberta.
Soon we will have the same junk that goes on in Europe with kids with disabilities being done away with.
The mentally ill are especially vulnerable as they may lack insight and not understand what they are agreeing to when this option is provided to them. I believe that death by doctor for the mentally ill is not acceptable. We already have doctors at the Grey Nuns Hospital in Edmonton imposing "Do Not Resuscitate" orders on mentally ill patients against the requirements of their Personal Directive for no other reason than they lacked the professionalism to do full work ups and reviews of the case. Why would we countenance legalized "Do not resuscitate" orders of the legal sort as provided by the Death by Doctor legislation? No, no and no..
Windsor man who has been fighting to get Ottawa to include mentally ill people in its assisted dying bill says his condition is getting worse.
CBC.CA
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http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/windsor/adam-maier-clayton-assisted-dying-windsor-1.3919212


Windsor assisted dying advocate says his condition is getting worse

Adam Maier-Clayton has tried cannabis oil and is being tested for Lyme disease

January 3, 2017
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Adam Maier-Clayton discusses his mental health issues 0:42
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A Windsor man who has been fighting to get the federal government to include mentally ill people in its assisted dying bill says his own condition is getting worse.
Adam Maier-Clayton has battled anxiety, mood disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder since he was a child.
"The pain levels are increasing," he said. "I time myself when speaking to people day to day. I only give people a certain amount of time, and then I'll just state I can't talk anymore because I know what will follow if I continue to talk."
Maier-Clayton describes his debilitating pain as feeling as though parts of his body are being burned with acid, but so far doctors have been unable to find a physical cause.
After graduating with honours in business from Algonquin College in Ottawa, Ont., the young man moved home to Windsor to live with his dad because the pain was just too much and he needed help.
Graham Clayton said he and his son will often use hand signals to communicate just to reduce the amount of time they have to spend talking as any cognitive activity can be difficult for the 27-year-old.

Not hopeful change will happen in his lifetime

Since CBC News first told the 27-year-old's story last fall he's tried cannabis oil and is waiting for the results of a Lyme disease test, but so far he has been unable to find relief from his agony.
"It's an exhausting ordeal to go through where you're trying all of these treatments and you desperately want to get better, because I obviously just want to go back to work and work 60-80 hour work weeks, but that's not happening," he said.
Maier-Clayton considers himself an advocate for assisted dying for the mentally ill and pushes for change through a YouTube channel and on social media, but said he's not hopeful the law will change in his lifetime.



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