Tuesday, January 17, 2017

David Eby, executive director of the BC Civil Liberties Assocaition, said he's pleased that West Vancouver Police have elaborated on their decision, but the investigation's findings should still be eyed with skepticism. "There's a total lack of transparency," Eby said. "We'll never hear testimony from the officers first hand, we'll never see any of the witness statements first hand. All we have here is a summary from another police force." Only an independent agency that investigates police conduct, which British Columbia currently lacks, could be trusted to thoroughly probe use of force complaints, Eby said.-------------Officers coaxed the boy out onto a porch on the property once to retrieve some personal items, and he appeared a second time to post an illegible note on a wall. When he appeared a third time, holding what officers say appeared to be a knife, he was Tasered and physically restrained. Lepine said Mounties then seized "what turned out to be not a knife but a pen." The officers had determined their attempts to de-escalate the situation were failing, and were told by adult witnesses at the scene that the boy appeared to be growing increasingly irate. They had spent 40 minutes trying to gain control of the situation before deploying a Taser, Lepine said. "After reviewing all of the information… it was clear to me that the officers involved responded to a dynamic, and potentially deadly, incident in a measured, appropriate and professional manner," Lepine wrote.------The boy's mother said the stun gun could have killed her son because he has a heart condition known as cardiomyopathy.--------------Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP--------------Commission launches complaint into RCMP TASER use on 11-year-old in Prince George, BC Ottawa - 2011-04-14 Related Links News Release – Commission to Monitor RCMP Taser Incident April 11, 2011 Chair-Initiated Complaint April 14, 2011 Ian McPhail Q.C., Interim Chair of the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP (Commission), has initiated a complaint into the conduct of RCMP members involved in the tasering of an 11-year-old boy in Prince George, British Columbia, on April 7, 2011. The complaint also addresses the adequacy of the actions taken by the RCMP in response to the incident. This complaint has been launched with full appreciation that the West Vancouver Police Department is currently conducting a criminal investigation into the incident. The Chair-initiated complaint will look at RCMP member conduct related to this case and whether it complied with policies, procedures, training and statutory requirements related to the use of force. The Commission had been monitoring the case since the incident occurred and felt it necessary to initiate its own complaint at this time. The Commission has done extensive work on RCMP taser use over the past few years–including individual high-profile investigations and reviews of Force-wide use. Many of the Commission's recommendations have been adopted by the RCMP, culminating in a new RCMP taser use policy which was announced in April 2010. For more information, please contact: Jamie Robertson Communications 613-952-3738 jamie.robertson@cpc-cpp.gc.ca

For months I have been asking about the report on the kid who was tasered in BC. The complaint was by the Commission to Monitor the RCMP who initiated this complaint in 2011. It is now 2017. How long for goodness sake does it take the RCMP to interview police officers and say that the results?


https://www.crcc-ccetp.gc.ca/en/newsroom/commission-launches-complaint-rcmp-taser-use-11-year-old-prince-george-bc

Commission launches complaint into RCMP TASER use on 11-year-old in Prince George, BC

Ottawa - 2011-04-14
Ian McPhail Q.C., Interim Chair of the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP (Commission), has initiated a complaint into the conduct of RCMP members involved in the tasering of an 11-year-old boy in Prince George, British Columbia, on April 7, 2011. The complaint also addresses the adequacy of the actions taken by the RCMP in response to the incident.
This complaint has been launched with full appreciation that the West Vancouver Police Department is currently conducting a criminal investigation into the incident.
The Chair-initiated complaint will look at RCMP member conduct related to this case and whether it complied with policies, procedures, training and statutory requirements related to the use of force.
The Commission had been monitoring the case since the incident occurred and felt it necessary to initiate its own complaint at this time. The Commission has done extensive work on RCMP taser use over the past few years–including individual high-profile investigations and reviews of Force-wide use. Many of the Commission's recommendations have been adopted by the RCMP, culminating in a new RCMP taser use policy which was announced in April 2010.
For more information, please contact:
Jamie Robertson
Communications
613-952-3738
jamie.robertson@cpc-cpp.gc.ca

When I asked about this case, there followed this correspondence:


From: Julie Ali <
Date: Tue, Jan 17, 2017 at 2:01 PM
Subject: Re: FW: TASER Use on Child Chair-Initiated Complaint Prince George, B.C. April 7, 2011
To: Anna Van Dusen <Anna.VanDusen@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca>


Hi,
When will this report be released?
Sincerely,
Julie Ali

On Tue, Dec 20, 2016 at 1:51 PM, Anna Van Dusen <Anna.VanDusen@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca> wrote:
Hi Julie,

The report has not yet been posted.


Thank you,
Anna

From: Julie Ali [mailto:
Sent: Friday, December 16, 2016 11:16 PM
To: Anna Van Dusen
Subject: Re: FW: TASER Use on Child Chair-Initiated Complaint Prince George, B.C. April 7, 2011

Hi,
I could not find this report on the website.
Is it up?
Thanks, Julie.

On Fri, Nov 25, 2016 at 10:15 AM, Anna Van Dusen <Anna.VanDusen@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca> wrote:
Good afternoon,

The report in question has been completed and will be made available to the public on the Commission's website shortly.

Thank you,

Anna

Anna Van Dusen
Communication Strategist
The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP



---------------------

From: Julie Ali <
Date: Tue, Oct 11, 2016 at 2:38 PM
Subject: TASER Use on Child Chair-Initiated Complaint Prince George, B.C. April 7, 2011
To: Media@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca

Hi,
When will the report for this investigation on the child who was tasered be completed? 
Sincerely,
Julie Ali

TASER Use on Child

Chair-Initiated Complaint
Prince George, B.C.
April 7, 2011


Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Rogers network.



It's enough to make you wonder if all these reports are top secret and are only released after the deaths of all concerned.

I asked about the child who was tasered as well of the British Columbia's Representative for Children and Youth.


From: Julie Ali <
Date: Tue, Oct 11, 2016 at 2:28 PM
Subject: Re: Follow up
To: "Naughton, Bill RCY:EX" <Bill.Naughton@rcybc.ca>





Hi Mr. Naughton,



I usually don't call government bodies as I like to have a paper trail.



This is necessary as legal action sometimes accompanies the publication of blog posts.

Without a paper trail I don't have any protections.

One small example is my investigation of the respiratory care of my handicapped sister in long term care in Alberta that resulted in legal action by the organization. I am currently defending myself in court and I am only able to do this due to robust documentation (paper trail) of the failures of the continuing care industry, government and so called advocates in Alberta. I provide you with the statement of defence so you are clear on why I require a paper trail. As you can see from this statement of defence, telling the truth to the public results in retribution. Without a paper trail I would be folded into an origami shape and disposed of.

​​
It's productive to simply have the answers to questions so that if there are any inconsistencies in the blog posts I write, I simply refer to the paper trail for the proof.
In most cases, I simply write the blog posts without contacting the Advocate either in BC or in Alberta because I base my blog posts on what is in the reports, in the media reports and in fatality inquiries. I like to compare two systems-the one in BC and the one in Alberta and see where the problems are. The problems seem to be at every step of the system and really I am surprised that all these kids aren't dead. I review the fatality reports as well for full cycle reviews. I don't know where to get the fatality inquiry reports in BC so I am limited but I am getting the fatality inquiry reports here in Alberta.

In the case of the 11 year old boy who was Tasered, I want to tie in your report with the RCMP review that is still in process.  the information I want to get from you is the follow up to the report---I just want to know if there are still problems with the care of this child. I care about him.
The system is pretty mucked up everywhere and this kid somehow survived this mess. Chidren simply have to do the work of survival in the system by themselves I am afraid. I find it is usually only the most assertive children who survive the dumb system in place. The gentle nice kids die out as in the case of the poor baby in the report I am reading here: https://www.rcybc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/pdf/reports_publications/rcy_tragedyinwaiting_final.pdf

So far the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP hasn't published any news (see Commission information below) about the Taser event. It is taking them ages to get this investigation done. The folks locally seem to have said it is fine to Taser kids as noted below but reasons for this odd stance is not provided (see Global News article below).

I don't think it is acceptable to Taser children or for that matter adults but there you go. If the Advocate's office is in enough hot water with the BC government that it doesn't want to yap about further problems in this case, I understand. It's tough doing this work and for the most part the public doesn't care as these are all folks who are seen as disposable.

There is a great deal of interest in this Taser case for the reason that it's not the right thing to do. Your office should issue a follow up report on this case once the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP has made it's report. This would provide a complete cycle review of this case and also provide the public with assurance that this child is being taken care of appropriately even if this care doesn't completely meet his complex needs. I am afraid there is no complex care management anywhere I have looked and this is surprising because you would think government would be proactive in this matter.

Thanks for your help.
Sincerely,
Julie



September 15, 2011 11:48 am

No charges for using RCMP Taser on B.C. boy, but police refuse to explain why

By The Canadian Press
- A A +
PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. – The RCMP officers who stunned an 11-year-old boy with a Taser in northeastern British Columbia won’t face charges, but the outside police force that conducted the investigation won’t reveal the most basic details about what happened.
The child was shocked with the stun gun in April after several Mounties responded to a stabbing at a group home in Prince George.
The case renewed controversy about Taser use in B.C., which recently held an exhaustive public inquiry into the weapons, and raised questions about why trained police officers would need to use the weapon on a child. The boy is believed to be the youngest person ever to be stunned with a police Taser in Canada.
But an outside investigation by the West Vancouver Police Department has done little to address the controversy, other than to conclude the officers involved didn’t break the law.
“My team spent much of this spring and summer interviewing witnesses, collecting and analysing evidence and consulting with those in the legal profession as well as subject matter experts in topics like police use of force,” West Vancouver police Chief Peter Lepine wrote in a brief letter released Thursday.
“We have concluded that the actions of the officers involved did not violate the Criminal Code of Canada and we are not recommending charges.”
An RCMP officer with 18 months on the force was placed on administrative leave after the incident. No one from the RCMP was available Thursday to discuss the case or the status of that officer.
Few details about the confrontation have ever been released. Police have never said whether the boy was armed or if he was attacking or threatening the officers at the time.
West Vancouver police spokesman Insp. Fred Harding declined to fill in the blanks on Thursday. Harding noted the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP and B.C.’s children’s watchdog have launched their own reviews, and he said releasing more information could jeopardize those investigations.
Harding would only say that the investigation concluded the use of the Taser was appropriate “based on the totality of the circumstances,” while refusing to offer any details about what those circumstances were.
Still, Harding said the public can have confidence in the investigation’s findings.
“There’s got to be accountability on police, and there’s got to be accountability on the part of the officers that were there, and from everything that I understand about this investigation, they’ve addressed their accountability,” said Harding.
“The accountability to the public comes from the fact that West Vancouver Police Department has done a thorough investigation.”
A report released last year by the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP identified 194 cases between 2002 and 2009 in which the force deployed Tasers on subjects aged 13 to 17, including two 13-year-olds. None were as young as 11.
The same report said RCMP Taser deployments against youth were more common in B.C. than in any other province.
Micheal Vonn of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association said the case is a perfect example of why the police shouldn’t be investigating police.
“When we’re using Tasers on someone at this age, we have to ask ourselves a number of questions, including, what kind of extraordinary circumstances could justify such a thing?” Vonn said in an interview.
“That is very difficult to envision. I’m not saying it couldn’t happen, but we need the circumstances.”
The B.C. government is currently setting up an independent body to investigate serious allegations involving police, and the RCMP have said they will call in the provincial body in cases involving its officers. The Independent Investigations Office has been searching for its civilian director and the office is expected to be open by the end of the year.
Such an independent body was a key recommendation from the public inquiry into the death of Robert Dziekanski.
Dziekanski died in Vancouver’s airport in October 2007, when he was confronted by four RCMP officers and stunned multiple times with a Taser.
After a two-part public inquiry, commissioner Thomas Braidwood concluded Tasers can be fatal in rare circumstances, and he identified several factors that would increase that risk.
Among those most at risk, Braidwood wrote in one of his reports, were people with pre-existing heart conditions and children because of their smaller size.
The parents of the 11-year-boy stunned in Prince George have said he suffers from bipolar disorder and a heart condition.
B.C.’s children’s watchdog announced her own investigation, specifically looking at the boy’s care in the government-run group home.
Children’s representative Mary-Ellen Turpel Lafond has said her investigation will examine whether staff at the Prince George facility and other group homes are adequately trained and properly regulated.
Solicitor General Shirley Bond said she doesn’t know details of the investigation but has received assurances from West Vancouver police that it was thorough.
“I think everyone recognizes that this particular circumstance raised a great deal of concern, certainly there was a very strong reaction across the province,” she said.
“The process that’s in place today in British Columbia sees this as the investigative process, and the West Vancouver police department have done the job that was requested of them.”
– By James Keller in Vancouver


Commission launches complaint into RCMP TASER use on 11-year-old in Prince George, BC

Ottawa - 2011-04-14

Related Links

Ian McPhail Q.C., Interim Chair of the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP (Commission), has initiated a complaint into the conduct of RCMP members involved in the tasering of an 11-year-old boy in Prince George, British Columbia, onApril 7, 2011. The complaint also addresses the adequacy of the actions taken by the RCMP in response to the incident.
This complaint has been launched with full appreciation that the West Vancouver Police Department is currently conducting a criminal investigation into the incident.
The Chair-initiated complaint will look at RCMP member conduct related to this case and whether it complied with policies, procedures, training and statutory requirements related to the use of force.
The Commission had been monitoring the case since the incident occurred and felt it necessary to initiate its own complaint at this time. The Commission has done extensive work on RCMP taser use over the past few years–including individual high-profile investigations and reviews of Force-wide use. Many of the Commission's recommendations have been adopted by the RCMP, culminating in a new RCMP taser use policy which was announced in April 2010.
For more information, please contact:
Jamie Robertson
Communications

Ongoing Investigations

The Commission receives, on average, 2,000 public complaints per year. To respect the privacy of complainants, the Commission’s website only includes reports involving Chairperson-Initiated Complaints (where the Commission Chairperson is the complainant) and Public Interest Investigations about incidents that are already in the public domain.









2011

TASER Use on Child

Chair-Initiated Complaint
Prince George, B.C.
April 7, 2011
Chair-Initiated Complaint (April 14, 2011)


*****************************************
No follow up information.

What the heck is wrong with government and public bodies? Don't they know they have a duty to help the public with reference to information provision? Just telling us the kid is OK would be good and also to find out that they won't do the Taser route on kids again would be good.

In addition the folks in the RCMP may have been a tad over excitable since there are reports now the kid wasn't holding a weapon at all:




Tasered 11-year-old was holding pen, not knife

  • 0


Andrew Weichel, ctvbc.ca
Published Monday, October 17, 2011 5:41PM PDT
The 11-year-old stabbing suspect who was Tasered by Mounties in Prince George, B.C. earlier this year was holding a pen, not a knife, when he was shocked, according to the police force tasked with investigating the incident.

RELATED LINKS

PHOTOS

A residential neighbourhood in Prince George, B.C. is seen.
A residential neighbourhood in Prince George, B.C. is seen.
But the boy, who is hearing impaired and was not wearing his hearing aids during the encounter, was seen holding a knife and slashing at his own shirt prior to a Taser being deployed, said West Vancouver Police Chief Peter Lepine.
Lepine posted an open letter on his department's website Monday elaborating on his decision not to recommend charges against RCMP officers involved in the April 7 incident in Prince George.
The young suspect had also been seen running a blade on his hand and arms and gesturing at officers with his middle finger, Lepine wrote, adding that Mounties interpreted the action as "a demonstration of the boy's lack of respect for police."
The boy had already barricaded himself inside a local residence when police arrived to investigate a 911 call reporting a 37-year-old man had been stabbed.
The officers had received information that the child was prone to "extremely violent outbursts, during which he exhibited extraordinary strength for his age and size."
Officers coaxed the boy out onto a porch on the property once to retrieve some personal items, and he appeared a second time to post an illegible note on a wall.
When he appeared a third time, holding what officers say appeared to be a knife, he was Tasered and physically restrained. Lepine said Mounties then seized "what turned out to be not a knife but a pen."
The officers had determined their attempts to de-escalate the situation were failing, and were told by adult witnesses at the scene that the boy appeared to be growing increasingly irate.
They had spent 40 minutes trying to gain control of the situation before deploying a Taser, Lepine said.
"After reviewing all of the information… it was clear to me that the officers involved responded to a dynamic, and potentially deadly, incident in a measured, appropriate and professional manner," Lepine wrote.
West Vancouver investigators ultimately chose not to recommend charges after determining the Mounties' use of force did not violate the criminal code.
"The level of force they planned for, and ultimately used, was commensurate with the overall threat presented," said Lepine. "I not only deem the officers' actions to be appropriate to the situation, I deem them commendable."
West Vancouver investigators were put on the defensive early in the probe when it was revealed the Mounties involved had not been interviewed more than a week after the confrontation.
Lepine drew further criticism for his brief 400-word explanation of the Sept. 15 announcement that charges were not being recommended. His Oct. 17 update was more than 1,850 words long.
David Eby, executive director of the BC Civil Liberties Assocaition, said he's pleased that West Vancouver Police have elaborated on their decision, but the investigation's findings should still be eyed with skepticism.
"There's a total lack of transparency," Eby said. "We'll never hear testimony from the officers first hand, we'll never see any of the witness statements first hand. All we have here is a summary from another police force."
Only an independent agency that investigates police conduct, which British Columbia currently lacks, could be trusted to thoroughly probe use of force complaints, Eby said.
"Did West Vancouver police talk to all the witnesses, did they ask all the difficult questions?" Eby said. "In our experience with police investigating police, generally they do not."
The Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP and B.C.'s children's watchdog are also watching the case, but Eby said those investigations will be relying on the same primary investigation report prepared by West Vancouver Police.
"It certainly gives the appearance of separate investigations, but there's really only one and that's police investigating themselves."
An officer with just 18 months experience was placed on administrative leave following the incident.
The boy's mother said the stun gun could have killed her son because he has a heart condition known as cardiomyopathy.

*******************

This all seems bewildering to this mummy. Or is everyone in government inclined to just keep the lid on this case because it is embarrassing for all concerned in government and in the RCMP?
I mean I really think it is unlikely that the kid could have killed anyone with a pen. Even though the pen is mightier than the sword in terms of journalism I doubt that this 11 year old kid could have written a tome big enough to inflict damage on the officers. It's highly odd.

But there you go. Maybe the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP complaint report that took from 2011 to 2017 to write up is still going to be kept under wraps for another century because it confirms that the RCMP used a Taser on a kid because they were afraid of a pen.

It's ridiculous. Why can't the force be trained in the proper protocols in dealing with mentally ill and sick children?

I have to agree with the BC Civil Liberties Association that the chatter of the police can't be relied upon. Mr. Peter Lepine delayed responding to the case, the report he issued does not seem robust and we are still waiting for anyone to respond clearly to this case which appears to me to be a human rights infringement case.
Why wasn't a human rights complaint laid?
It's a good question.

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/tasered-11-year-old-was-holding-pen-not-knife-1.712666


West Vancouver investigators were put on the defensive early in the probe when it was revealed the Mounties involved had not been interviewed more than a week after the confrontation.
Lepine drew further criticism for his brief 400-word explanation of the Sept. 15 announcement that charges were not being recommended. His Oct. 17 update was more than 1,850 words long.
David Eby, executive director of the BC Civil Liberties Assocaition, said he's pleased that West Vancouver Police have elaborated on their decision, but the investigation's findings should still be eyed with skepticism.
"There's a total lack of transparency," Eby said. "We'll never hear testimony from the officers first hand, we'll never see any of the witness statements first hand. All we have here is a summary from another police force."
Only an independent agency that investigates police conduct, which British Columbia currently lacks, could be trusted to thoroughly probe use of force complaints, Eby said.



 The chatter of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP also seems to be rather tardy and whether the report it generates is equally non-transparent will be determined after the report is finally released if it ever is. Also the watch dog body is using the same information apparently as was generated by the RCMP in the first place. It's all very troubling to me.

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/tasered-11-year-old-was-holding-pen-not-knife-1.712666
The Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP and B.C.'s children's watchdog are also watching the case, but Eby said those investigations will be relying on the same primary investigation report prepared by West Vancouver Police.


Some one in the BC government needs to actually provide clarity in this case and explain to the public why a 11 year old mentally ill child who has been abused in the care of the government of BC faced further trauma as a consequence of a lack of appropriate care. This kid has been through hell. And we don't know if he is going through more hell.

But in an interesting twist on this case the government is suing itself to indicate that the child is being protected after the fact in terms of getting compensation for suffering abuse in the care of the government. So neat.

We pay for the child to get substandard care in the child welfare system.
We pay for the child to be Tasered by the police.
Now we pay for the child to be compensated.
It's all such a mess.

Meanwhile we have more money down the drain as government sues itself. Instead of making a complex care facility like Michener Centre these folks in BC are determined to show the world that even if they were negligent in the care of this kid, they will get compensation for the guardian of this kid. Which makes me wonder, where the heck was the Public Guardian when the kid was going through all  this abuse?
Why wasn't the Public Guardian also liable for this shocking situation?

Province Of B.C. Sued By Guardian Of Boy Tasered By Police

CP  |  By Vivian Luk, The Canadian Press
Posted: 02/18/2014 1:59 pm EST Updated: 04/20/2014 5:59 am EDT
Print
Jupiterimages via Getty Images
VANCOUVER - The guardian of a British Columbia boy who was jolted by a police Taser while in government care is suing the province for subjecting him to neglect and abuse that a court document says left him traumatized.
A civil claim filed in B.C. Supreme Court alleges the boy, who is now 14, endured years of emotional and physical trauma while living in numerous foster homes and group homes across the province.
The court document says the Public Guardian and Trustee of British Columbia is suing the Ministry of Children and Family Development for negligence and breach of fiduciary duty. It alleges the ministry consistently put the boy in homes where he suffered emotional and physical abuse.
"The ministry repeatedly failed to provide a safe, stable and nurturing home for the plaintiff," it says.
"Rather than providing supports for foster parents, or pursuing the option of adoption, the ministry moved the child into a series of group home settings that could not provide security, stability or a long-term sustaining relationship for the plaintiff."
The province's director of child welfare, the two owners of a Dawson Creek-area foster home, and a social worker are also listed as defendants in the case.
The document says the Taser incident happened in April 2011, when the boy was 11 years old. About a week after he moved into his sixth group home, he escaped into a nearby trailer and then stabbed the group home manager with a steak knife.
RCMP were called, and when the boy stepped outside the trailer, police zapped him with a Taser. The document alleges that happened because the government put the boy through living arrangements that "created a situation of isolation and anxiety."
The Children's Ministry refused to comment on the lawsuit, saying the case is before the courts. It has three weeks to file a response.
The boy's traumatic childhood was documented in a scathing report last year by the province's children's watchdog. Representative Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond said the teen's suffering could have been prevented if the government had invested in proper residential care.
Turpel-Lafond said Tuesday that she continues to follow the boy's progress, and she believes the lawsuit is a positive step.
"There's a lot of evidence (the boy) was harmed ... over the years," she said.
"Certainly, if there is a parent whose child went through this, I think they would be looking at the same issue. And when you have a vulnerable child, it's important we take very seriously that they have basic civil rights as does anyone else."
The court document says the boy, who now lives in an adolescent treatment centre, was born into an abusive and unsafe environment but that he was not removed from his parents' care until he was two years old.
After that, he was placed in foster care. At his second foster home, he endured three years of ill treatment.
The home, which is now closed, had a history of abuse, yet the government did not launch an investigation until 2004, when the boy was five years old, the court document alleges.
It says the child was put in cold showers for wetting his bed, fed hot sauce as punishment and shut in his room or the garage for long periods of time.
"The ministry failed to maintain meaningful contact with the child while he was in foster care and as a result, the ministry added to the plaintiff's trauma," the document says.
The boy was then placed in a variety of foster homes and care homes. With each placement, he became more aggressive and police had to be called at one point to take him to B.C. Children's Hospital in Vancouver, where he underwent a psychiatric assessment.
Even though a mental health specialist recommended a therapeutic family home setting for the boy, he was placed in a facility where he was confined in a so-called safe room whenever he was non-compliant, the court document says.
"The use of these rooms by the ministry, given the plaintiff's prior experience with being confined, has contributed further to his 're-traumatization,'" it said.
After Turpel-Lafond released her report, Children's Minister Stephanie Cadieux said she was "heartbroken that the system failed this child," and that her ministry would implement Turpel-Lafond's recommendations.
They included creating a residential service program for children with complex needs, implementing senior management oversight for cases involving children with complex needs, developing a ministry unit to provide training and clinical support to those dealing with complex-needs children and youth and immediately stopping the use of isolation rooms to manage behaviour in care homes.
Turpel-Lafond said her recommendations have not yet been implemented. Last year, Cadieux said the government is building a new six-bed facility for children with intensive needs, but the youth advocate said she is not satisfied with the facility's location and model of care.
"With respect to building the proper type of therapeutic support for children who have intensive needs, British Columbia has not made progress on that front in the past year since this report was released, so this remains outstanding," she said.
Follow @vivluk on Twitter

******
Maybe the Office of the Public Guardian is finally doing its job because of the media attention this case received. I get the feeling that this office isn't too robust in its oversight either if all this was going on and they were in la la land.

I am curious if the kid will get any of this money. Or will the Office of the Public Guardian get it all?

Meanwhile based on the last article looks like the BC Children's Minister cried the usual crocodile tears of the government employee and then didn't do anything:

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/02/18/province-bc-sued-boy-tasered-police_n_4809759.html
After Turpel-Lafond released her report, Children's Minister Stephanie Cadieux said she was "heartbroken that the system failed this child," and that her ministry would implement Turpel-Lafond's recommendations.
They included creating a residential service program for children with complex needs, implementing senior management oversight for cases involving children with complex needs, developing a ministry unit to provide training and clinical support to those dealing with complex-needs children and youth and immediately stopping the use of isolation rooms to manage behaviour in care homes.
Turpel-Lafond said her recommendations have not yet been implemented. Last year, Cadieux said the government is building a new six-bed facility for children with intensive needs, but the youth advocate said she is not satisfied with the facility's location and model of care.
********************************

You gotta admire politicians. So neat. Incompetence, open and shut case of negligence and further revelations of more incompetence. All such poor value for our public dollars.  In Alberta, I have yet to hear of the Public Guardian even doing this suing business. It usually has to be lawyers like Mr. Lee who do this junk and get delayed for years. I will provide his Youtube video so you get some understanding of the junk faced by lawyers who try to hold the GOA accountable:


I can't wait for the next instalment on this story to report to you what poor deliverables we have from our tax dollars.

Unfortunately Ms. Turpel-Lafond is no longer in office so we won't get the same quality of exposure of the incompetence of the BC Liberals any longer.

After the media feeding frenzy Ms. Turpel-Lafond did a good job exposing the failures of the government of BC in the care of kids with complex needs. But even with her hard work the kid is probably not going to get the complex care he needs or the integrated care plan that is essential. As far as I can determine there are no complex care teams anywhere in Canada capable of looking after the needs of our most vulnerable citizens simply because government doesn't want to pay for intelligence but would rather have kids and adults suffer in this unacceptable manner. Ultimately we pay for this poor service delivery and the costs of this poor service delivery would be equivalent to having a functional complex care facility like the Michener Centre funded and operational. But you know how it is in politics. Short term goals.  Have tons of media exposure for the next election. And make a dynasty. It's the Alberta way and it's the BC way. Dumb and dumber.



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http://bc.ctvnews.ca/tasered-boy-11-was-under-24-hour-solo-care-1.630723


Tasered boy, 11, was under 24-hour solo care

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The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, April 12, 2011 5:02PM PDT
An 11-year-old boy who was shocked by an RCMP Taser was the only child living in a British Columbia residential facility, with two staff members looking after him 24 hours a day.
Darren Harbord, a spokesman with the Ministry of Children and Families, said Tuesday that the child was not living in a group home outside Prince George, B.C., as originally believed.
"The ministry deals with some troubled and vulnerable children and youth and each child's placement is based on their individual needs," he said.

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"We can't get into specifics about this child. It depends on a child's needs, essentially, because a lot of children in care are very vulnerable, obviously, and some of them have very high needs."
The child was jolted by a Taser after Mounties responded to a 911 call about a 37-year-old staff member at the facility being stabbed last Thursday.
RCMP have said officers found the boy, the suspect in the stabbing, at a neighbouring property. The conducted energy weapon was deployed after he emerged, during his arrest.
The West Vancouver Police Department is investigating, and Sgt. Paul Skelton said two detectives who arrived in Prince George on Sunday are expected to complete the initial part of their probe there by Wednesday afternoon.
The Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP is closely monitoring the case, and Children's watchdog Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond has said she is leaning toward doing a probe of what she called a disturbing case.
Aboriginal leaders say they want an independent investigation into the incident because the boy was First Nations, and RCMP have a sometimes troubled relationship with the aboriginal community.
"Shock waves have reverberated through the aboriginal community," said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs.
"It's absolutely outrageous that the RCMP would Taser an 11-year-old child, no matter what the circumstance is," he said.
Chief Wayne Christian, co-chairman of the First Nations Child and Family Wellness Council in Prince George, said an independent body, not another police department, should be conducting the investigation into the circumstances that led a Mountie to deploy a Taser on the child.
Christian said the case is a test of Premier Christy Clark's "families first" agenda and that the government needs to adopt recommendations from a report by the province's independent children's advocate if she investigates the incident.
"I hope that when the premier talks about families first in British Columbia, it also includes our families," he said.
Doug Kinna, a spokesman for the B.C. Government and Service Employees' Union, said some group homes and facilities for vulnerable children are licensed while others are not.
"We're trying to figure out what happened with this home," he said of the facility where the boy was staying.
"I'm concerned that children could be placed in any setting that does not have the proper checks and balances -- from criminal record checks, to credentialing, to training and supervision," he said.
"Those are all things that are in place in licensed group homes," he said of the homes that hire either BCGEU or Hospital Employees Union workers.
A report released last year by the RCMP public complaints commission suggests that up to now, the youngest person to have been jolted by an RCMP Taser was 13 years old.
Skelton said police are mindful of public criticism.
Turpel-Lafond has said the boy was assessed in hospital and is back in government care.


http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/tasered-11-year-old-boy-failed-by-b-c-child-welfare-system-watchdog-1.1034448


Tasered 11-year-old boy failed by B.C. child welfare system: watchdog

CANADIAN PRESS / STAFF WRITER
FEBRUARY 7, 2013 01:00 AM
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 - Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, B.C. Representative for Children and Youth.
VICTORIA - Children's watchdog Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond says British Columbia's child welfare system failed an 11-year-old Prince George boy who was zapped by an RCMP Taser almost two years ago.
Turpel-Lafond says in a report released today that serious errors made by the Ministry for Children and Family Development left the boy open to abuse and neglect in his family home and in the homes he was placed in by the ministry.
Her report says the boy's case is one of the most difficult she's investigated, but it's not the only one where safe homes have not been available to children with complex needs.
The report says the April 2011 Taser incident and most of the 22 critical injuries reported about the child could have been prevented if the ministry had invested in proper residential care.
Turpel-Lafond's report says the boy has been placed in so-called safe rooms which isolated the child.
She calls on the ministry to immediately stop using isolation and restraint as a method to manage behaviour.
- See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/tasered-11-year-old-boy-failed-by-b-c-child-welfare-system-watchdog-1.1034448#sthash.mrAdh7DE.dpuf
https://www.rcybc.ca/reports-and-publications/reports/cid-reviews-and-investigations/who-protected-him-how-bcs-child


Who Protected Him? How B.C.'s Child Welfare System Failed One of Its Most Vulnerable Children



Child in a tunnel
FEBRUARY 7, 2013
The Representative's investigation examines the entire life and the full spectrum of services that this young boy and his family received and whether they were appropriate and responsive to his needs.
https://www.rcybc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/pdf/reports_publications/rcy_whocares-report_-_final.pdf


Who Cares? B.C. Children with Complex Medical, Psychological and Developmental Needs and their Families Deserve Better December 2014



If the RCMP are going to be Tasering 11 year old kids who carry a pen this does not bode well for any writer. I trust that there will be someone, somewhere explaining to mummies like myself why a mentally ill child who had received substandard care by the government of BC is further traumatized by police who are afraid of a pen.
It's not a good performance by all concerned. Meanwhile we don't have the report from the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP. It's been ongoing since 2011. Surely it doesn't take 6 years to tell the public that the police were afraid of a kid with a pen?

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